Talk:Late Middle Japanese

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Final -t & -m[edit]

"Traditionally syllables were of (C)V structure. As such, there was no need to distinguish between syllables and morae. However, Chinese loanwords introduced a new type of sound that could end in -m, -n, or -t. This structure is (C)V(C) and is a syllable. The mora is based on the traditional (C)V structure."

How were the -t and -m written in kana? 67.39.200.112 (talk) 17:05, 3 May 2009 (UTC)

Please refer to the cited references for more details. Bendono (talk) 01:29, 4 May 2009 (UTC)
I've looked for those cited references on Google Scholar, and haven't found anything. Did syllable-final consonants ever truly exist in Japanese (except -n), i.e. preserved in Chinese loanwords, or were they just rendered to fit Japanese's (C)V structure?. Sjiveru (talk) 01:33, 14 June 2010 (UTC)
No offense, but if you really did read the cited references, then there would be no need for your comment. Having just reviewed the citations now, they are quite detailed on matter. Also, I suggest an actual library. Regards, Bendono (talk) 13:50, 16 June 2010 (UTC)

Early Modern Japanese and Middle Japanese Coexisted?[edit]

The letter f is pronounced in various regions of Japan as it is in Latin. In others it is pronounced as if it were an imperfect h. For both pronunciations the lips and the mouth should be nearly, but not completely, closed.

When there are two tt, xx, zz, qq, cq, ij, or pp[47] it is important to persist in order to obtain perfect pronunciation and the exact value of the word; for mizu means 'honey' and mizzu means 'water.' Therefore, if the words are said with the same strength or the same gentleness they can mean either 'water' or 'honey.'

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21197/21197-h/21197-h.htm

On basing on the text by Diego Collado it seems that Early Modern Japanese already existed or Proto Modern Japanese on the same time as Middle Japanese.--Kasumi-genx (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 14:00, 3 October 2009 (UTC).