Talk:Lawrencium

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2005 comment[edit]

Article changed over to new Wikipedia:WikiProject Elements format by maveric149. Elementbox converted 10:14, 15 July 2005 by Femto (previous revision was that of 04:47, 23 June 2005).

Information Sources[edit]

Some of the text in this entry was rewritten from Los Alamos National Laboratory - Lawrencium. Additional text was taken directly from the Elements database 20001107 (via dict.org), and WordNet (r) 1.7 (via dict.org). Data for the table were obtained from the sources listed on the subject page and Wikipedia:WikiProject Elements but were reformatted and converted into SI units.


Talk[edit]


Why did the symbol change from Lw to Lr in '63?

and was is in 1963 or 1997 ? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 194.250.184.205 (talk) 08:44, 28 June 2012 (UTC)

Electron configuration typo?[edit]

Shouldn't the electron configuration for Lawrencium be [Rn]5f14 6d1 7s2? I'm not a chemist (just studying it en route to an engineering degree), but that is how it is shown on other chemistry sites.--H-ko 04:55, 3 September 2006 (UTC)

Reference is electron configurations of the elements (data page). They're all more or less educated guesses, I guess. NIST's data seems the most recent and reliable. Femto 10:50, 3 September 2006 (UTC)
Thanks for the information; I suppose the differences are due to the uncertainty.--H-ko 09:36, 4 September 2006 (UTC)
I agree with the first comment : Lr has an electronic configuration 7s2 5f14 6d1, according to Klechkowsky rule, and not 6p1. I think there is a mistake in electron configurations of the elements (data page). Darrigan
There is no mistake: the electron configuration is the one reported in Phys. Rev. A 52, 291-296 (1995) and comes from relativistic ab initio calculations. The Klechkowsky rule is empirical and has exceptions. Real electron configurations normally come from spectroscopic observations, but in this case the best we have, as far as I know, are these ab initio calculations. --Itub 17:26, 3 December 2007 (UTC)

Decay of 262-Lr[edit]

I removed the statement that 262Lr decays to 256No. Perhaps it should be 258Md (alpha decay) but in any case emission of significant/majority amounts of 6H in spontaneous fissions seems very improbable. Dajwilkinson 01:50, 18 August 2007 (UTC)

speculative chemical/physical properties[edit]

I've deleted the following text:

(in elementbox) appearance: unknown, probably silvery
white or metallic gray
(in elementbox) phase: presumably a solid
(under Notable characteristics, appearance is), however it is most likely silvery-white or gray and metallic

Since ability to produce more than a few atoms is so limited, these are mostly untestable assertions (and furthermore, there is no citation even for the speculations).Kingdon 21:44, 11 February 2007 (UTC)

i dont know how to change but should be[edit]

in the box of the element it should be 5d subscript 1 not p i dont know how to change that but it has the actual right fact farther down page —Preceding unsigned comment added by 172.165.129.182 (talk) 08:41, 4 December 2008 (UTC)

Correct no. of electrons per shell?[edit]

Is it: a) 2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 8, 3 as in the infobox, or b) 2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 9, 2 as in the Bohr model given in the text? If it is (a) that would make Lawrencium the only element with a valence number of 3 that is not in the boron group.Titus III (talk) 10:16, 15 February 2009 (UTC)

Why change from Lw to Lr?[edit]

So why was the symbol changed from Lw to Lr? - David Gerard (talk) 23:08, 5 August 2009 (UTC)

Whenever possible, the symbol for a new element is chosen to have the first letters of the first two syllables. If it is not possible, there is free choice, as long as the symbol doesn't clash with that of any other element. There have been some exceptions (Rf and Db are the only ones that are superheavy elements, when I think IUPAC came up with this guideline), but the newest elements all conform to this rule. Md and Lr were changed from Mv and Lw, likely because of this. Double sharp (talk) 13:11, 1 October 2013 (UTC)

Nuclear structure[edit]

The atom of 103Lr Lawrencium may be characterized as having a structure consisting of an accumulation of 103 deuterons plus a variable number of excess neutrons. Its longest halflife isotope is reported to be OE103Lr262 with 56 extra neutrons and a halflife of 3.6 hours (= 10E^4.116 log seconds). Its maximum isotope stability line characteristic is A = 3Z - 47. Its direction of decay is toward either EE102Nb262 Nobelium with 58 extra neutrons and A = 3Z - 44 (ec or B+ emission), or else backward by alpha emission to OE101Md258 with likewise 56 extra neutrons and an A = 3Z - 45 stability characteristic. The OE101Md258 isotope is noted to have the longer halflife.WFPM (talk) 20:41, 20 May 2012 (UTC)

We can also note that 103Lr Lawrencium is the first element of the 2 + 4 + 4 = 10 transition element series after the actinide series, which ends with element 112.WFPM (talk) 15:17, 21 May 2012 (UTC)

Nucleosynthesis[edit]

Huge parts of the "Nucleosynthesis" and "Isotopes" paragraph are available at Isotopes of lawrencium as well. I'd suggest to remove redundant parts from the Lawrencium article and simply keep the link to the isotopes. Soulblydd (talk) 15:15, 7 May 2014 (UTC)