Talk:Lewis chessmen

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The berzerk rook[edit]

As the photo I added doesn't show a berzerk rook (just the usual anxious-looking ones) here's a link to a photo in the British Museum's collection, showing him (he's the toothy guy on the right) [1]. Hmm, we curously don't seem to have an article either on berzerk (not the video game) or berzerker. -- Finlay McWalter | Talk 16:15, 26 Jun 2004 (UTC)

We have an article on berserker (Viking), though. Marnanel 14:19, 30 Jul 2004 (UTC)

"So-called ..."[edit]

Reverted to original version. Anyone who reads the article past the first sentence will see why they received the designation "Lewis Chessmen'. The article goes on to describe where they were found. The added text was moreover inserted at the wrong place in the first sentence, almost making it sound as if all the surviving sets were found on the Isle of Lewis! Eilthireach 18:20, 28 Mar 2005 (UTC)

That's true, but... many people don't really want to read past the first paragraph. Although not perfectly worded, the edit was well founded in suggesting that the lead paragraph could be better in summarising the key points of the article. See for example Wikipedia:Guide_to_writing_better_articles#Lead_section. -- Solipsist 19:16, 28 Mar 2005 (UTC)
Have inserted slight explication -- will be interested to see how long it lasts until reversion by the cabal -- Simon Cursitor 08:38, 20 February 2006 (UTC)

reproduction[edit]

Should it be mentioned that reproductions of these pieces are available, or not, since that is a commercial site? Bubba73 (talk), 16:34, 25 November 2006 (UTC)

inconsistencies[edit]

In the third paragraph, it states that "The 93 pieces form parts of..." and then states how many of each type but they don't add up to 93. In addition, 19 pawns is not enough for two complete sets: each side has 8 pawns initially in the modern game.

Agreed. The numbers seem to be simply copied from http://history.chess.free.fr/lewis.htm with no regard to their accuracy, nor a citation. The "93" number comes from including the checker/disc pieces and the belt buckle mentioned on that site: "They are 93 pieces forming parts of four or five sets, two complete. 82 are in the British Museum in London and 11 are in the National Museums of Scotland in Edinburgh. They are 8 Kings, 8 Queens, 16 Bishops, 15 Knights, 12 Warders (Rooks) and 19 Pawns. In addition, they are 14 plain disks for Tabula game (Backgammon ancestor) and 1 belt-buckle." If someone has an authoritative source for these it should be updated. Tofof 11:45, 14 June 2007 (UTC)

I fixed this. Ecphora (talk) 06:56, 28 January 2009 (UTC)

Chessmaster[edit]

I deleted this sentence:

A 3D computer simulation of chess with the Isle of Lewis chessmen can be played in the 10th edition of the chess software Chessmaster.

And replaced it with this:

The Isle of Lewis chessmen are one of the optional themed chess piece designs available for use in the more recent editions of the computer chess series Chessmaster.

The reason for this is that I own Chessmaster 9000, which also features the Lewis chessmen, so I know they were available before 10th Edition. I wrote "the more recent editions" instead of saying they became available starting with 9000, though, because 9000 is the first Chessmaster I've owned and I have no idea when the series began using the Lewis chessmen.

Numbers[edit]

The numbers for the different types of pieces add up to 78, i think it was, but anyway not 93. Johnbod (talk) 13:41, 23 November 2008 (UTC)

I fixed this.Ecphora (talk) 06:56, 28 January 2009 (UTC)
Under "Controversy" is still written "while the other 82 remain in the British Museum in London". But the total number is 78 isn't it? --Thomas Wozniak (talk) 13:25, 23 April 2013 (UTC)
That includes the 14 tablemen and apparently the belt buckle; I have clarified it. Ecphora (talk) 14:01, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

Edit needs checking[edit]

This anon edit needs to be checked. 24.177.121.141 (talk) 07:57, 24 May 2009 (UTC)

reverted. Rod is right. Johnbod (talk) 21:02, 24 May 2009 (UTC)

"Chess" pieces?[edit]

Since these pieces predate the modern rules of chess, would they be more accurately described as "shatranj" pieces? --GCarty (talk) 22:28, 1 August 2010 (UTC)

If there is no chessboard associated with the discovery, could the items actually be fortune telling devices or talismans? Dexter Nextnumber (talk) 21:35, 10 April 2013 (UTC)
That is a possibility. But several books with chess history think that they are chess pieces. Also they seem to correspond to chess pieces, both in type and relative number. Bubba73 You talkin' to me? 22:56, 10 April 2013 (UTC)

Medieval chess boards?[edit]

Are there also any know medieval chess boards that have survived? If so, and if there are Wikipedia articles on one or more of them, it might make sense to link them from this article. Thank you. -- 217.190.216.15 (talk) 13:46, 16 September 2010 (UTC)

Cloisters Exhibition[edit]

They're currently in NYC (well, a selection of them is) and the curatorship and display cases are magnificent. I'm wondering if some reference to their travels is appropriate.96.237.240.126 (talk) 12:02, 6 January 2012 (UTC)

Yes, add a couple of lines to the end of the lead, with dates. After the close it should go down to a lower section. Johnbod (talk) 13:17, 6 January 2012 (UTC)

a complete set? 2 sets? no complete sets?[edit]

The lede says "they may constitute some of the few complete, surviving medieval chess sets, although it is not clear if a set as originally made can be assembled from the pieces." I guess to me that would read more clearly as something like "They may constitute some of the few ... sets, although this is not clear". And then the talk page in the 'inconsistencies' section has a citation which says they form 2 complete sets. --Richardson mcphillips (talk) 22:32, 21 January 2014 (UTC)

does this relate?[edit]

Uig and the Chess Piece - geograph.org.uk - 588474.jpg

regards gangLeri ‫·‏לערי ריינהארט‏·‏T‏·‏m‏:‏Th‏·‏T‏·‏email me‏·‏‬ 10:43, 8 April 2014 (UTC)

how many pieces?[edit]

the current page says there are 67+11 pieces [11 in Edinburgh], but the British Museum website says there are 82+11 pieces. One of the earlier posts on the talk page refers to 93 pieces, so I guess somebody has changed the numbers. Does the British Museum actually lie? [1] 163.1.88.5 (talk) 07:29, 11 June 2014 (UTC) don knuth [stanford], typing this from borrowed computer while in the UK 163.1.88.5 (talk) 07:29, 11 June 2014 (UTC)

The difference lies in the 14 non-chess gaming pieces, plus a "buckle" for the bag seems to be counted in. so 67+14+1 = 82 in BM, + 11 in MoS = 93. Amended the article. Johnbod (talk) 01:11, 12 June 2014 (UTC)