Talk:Lewisian complex

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Lewisian Gneiss. Is it billions of years old?[edit]

How can we be certain that the Lewisian Gneiss is 3 billion years old? What rock layer it is in tells us nothing, except it is in that layer.

The dating methods used to date the rocks and fossils are a joke. 50% of the dates are thrown out. Any dates that don't fit with the evolution theory are the ones thrown out. How, then, can we trust the accepted dates? Radiometric dating is accurate, but the assumptions that are made while dating the rocks/fossils are wrong, leading to wrong dates.[1][2] Their dates are inconsistent, today the earth is 4.54 billions of years old [3], but in the 1890's it was believed to be inbetween 40 and 20 million years old [4]. The dates have changed a lot since.

The atmosphere shows signs that it is only thousands of years old. I refer to the equilibrium of the atmosphere, it has not yet full of carbon 14. If the earth was billions of years old, the earth's atmosphere would be filled with carbon 14, but it has not even reached equilibrium. When it does, the earth would be about 15,000 years old.

One form of dating scientists use are fossils, they date the rocks by the fossils yet they date the fossils by the rocks. They assume that different layers mean thousands or millions of years old, but when Mt. Saint Helens erupted the debris left behind multiple strata. Also, the lava and water carved a canyon within hours if not then minutes. Scientists say a canyon of Mars, that is much more larger than the grand canyon of earth, formed very rapidly. If this is true, then why can't the grand canyon have been carved very rapidly, too? Punk4orchrist (talk) 18:05, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

The simple answer is yes. The scientific evidence for this is overwhelming. Your comment betrays a fundamental misunderstanding of how rocks are dated - read radiometric dating with an open mind. Provide a reliable source that the Lewisian complex is anything other than billions of years old. Mikenorton (talk) 21:53, 7 January 2015 (UTC)