Talk:Life skills

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Merge suggestion[edit]

I don't think that life skills in Canada are that much different from life skills in, say, Norway. Muslim lo Juheu (talk) 23:30, 24 March 2011 (UTC)

Life skills actually are culture-bound. What is considered a life skill in the developed world may not have much applicability in a rural developing world community. Also, there are different national programs, curricula and even laws regarding education of life skills. I am doing some investigation now, but, for example, in the United States, looking up "life skills curricula" may come up with a great deal of emphasis on special education and Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), whereas other cultures may focus more on general population education. There are also different age-level life skills differences. What you teach a K-6 child about the world and life skills will be different than the financial literacy you teach a high schooler or adult. Petercorless (talk) 15:51, 29 April 2011 (UTC)


Life Skills In Canada is actually referring to a particular school or type of program called Life Skills Canada (I believe). It is taught in social and community organizations and is supported somehow by the Y.W.C.A. of Metropolitan Toronto. to be certified as a life skills 'coach' you must have graduated from three life skill 'modules' that are specific to becoming a 'coach'. Life Skill Coach Classes can be attended at George Brown College in Toronto. (there will be errors here please check, as i dont care) DO NOT MERGE

I agree Life Skills may have cultural differences, but I suspect we're more same than different. If this article IS referring to a particular school, might it not be wise to explain that? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Melissa Peace Seeker (talkcontribs) 19:59, 3 March 2013 (UTC)

This page should not have been merged with Life Skills. The page "Life Skills in Canada" describes the Saskatchewan NewStart model of Life Skills, which, while developed with federal and provincial money in Saskatchewan 40-some years ago, is now taught across Canada and occasionally internationally [1]. The page "Life Skills" is not about Saskatchewan NewStart Life Skills at all. It is instead a generic round up like that of Petercorless, above. Perhaps the original "Life Skills in Canada" page should be renamed "Saskatchewan NewStart Life Skills" and have the redirect go to that.Rod Paynter (talk) 16:08, 20 July 2013 (UTC)

Writing[edit]

This article needs some serious cleaning up. There are spelling errors (I've already fixed a few), and the flow is choppy.

Sentences like this are problematic:

Based upon their research The Family and Youth Services Bureau, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services advocates the theory of Positive Youth Development[8] as a replacement for the less effective prevention programs.


IndianaBooth (talk) 20:08, 1 March 2012 (UTC)

  1. ^ http://calsca.com