Talk:Lignite

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Ash content[edit]

The ash content for the lignite is way lower than the lignite used for power production in Eastern Europe and other places. Lignite with up to 40% ash content (when dry) is used and there is bibliography and links about this. However, I don't know if the figures given in the wikipedia page are ash content for water-free lignite or for lignite as is (with 40-60% water) so I don't edit it. Please be more specific. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Apavlides24 (talkcontribs) 12:48, 15 February 2013 (UTC)

brown coal[edit]

Lignite. See Brown coal.

Types of Lignite The three "types" of Lignite listed under the header Types of Lignite all have links referring to the paragraph they are contained in.

"xyloid lignite or fossil wood and the second form is the compact lignite or perfect lignite." I have removed the links. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ptrask (talkcontribs) 14:40, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

Germany[edit]

According to a report from Federal Ministry for the Environment,Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (In Germany) the contribuition from Lignite in power production was a lot higher. 151.1 TWh in 2006 (23.7%), 155.1 TWh in 2007 (24.4) and 150.8 TWh in 2008 (23.7%). Where does the numner 11% come from I wonder? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ki98mama (talkcontribs) 09:38, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Chemistry[edit]

Hmm, I was hoping for a bit more of chemistry and scientific facts, such as the chemical composition, distribution on carbon and other elements, perhaps an illustration showing what the composistion looks like on atomic scale - if that is possible? Is there an expert on the subject who can provide some of that? :-) Medico80 08:56, 30 June 2007 (UTC)

coking[edit]

Can't you coke the stuff? 132.205.44.5 (talk) 04:47, 11 February 2008 (UTC)


image[edit]

I try to insert a second picture, but i failed. I like this

[1]

or this most impressive panorama [2] --Entrophie (talk) 20:01, 5 March 2008 (UTC)


Close up Image[edit]

I am going to try and find an image that is close-up of this Mineraloid

Denton22 (talk) 17:49, 13 March 2008 (UTC)

Hazelwood Power Station[edit]

I do not know enough if adding Australia to the end of Hazelwood Power Station, Victoria will break the link, but it does need to be done, as it is quite confusing on first read as to where the powerstation is located. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.117.251.4 (talk) 16:20, 18 October 2010 (UTC)

Technological advance[edit]

Yesterday, Australian miner T. Forrest announced in the World Economic Forum in Davos that he will be initiating to turn lignite into Diesel in Pakistan. This is extremely significant if this will reduce pollution which is extremely high when burning lignite/brown coal. I had thought 'they' had given up on turning brown coal into diesel. Research was stopped at one point some years ago.

Environmentalists and others had hoped that the heavily polluting Hazelwood Power Station in Victoria could be closed down through the carbon tax, carbon trading (or something), but this has not happened, because of costs, jobs, and of course the financial loss of the nearby brown coal mining operations. If there now exists a process that the mining can continue and the power can be generated through diesel, that is a game changer for Australia, and the rest of the world. 121.209.53.9 (talk) 02:55, 24 January 2014 (UTC)