Talk:LinkedIn

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LinkedIn Groups – Update and Additional Information[edit]

Groups are the real meeting and networking places on LinkedIn and I’d like to suggest adding additional and updated information on the Groups.

I will just include the information here for the editors here to consider for incorporation.


As of Tuesday, February 25th, 2012, there were 1,212,244 Groups on LinkedIn. Peter Lee, the CEO of WireWalkersVA, created the largest Group (Job Openings, Job Leads and Job Connections!) on Memorial Day – May 25th, 2009 - and currently has 700,003 Members.Italic text


Links: - WireWalkersVA - links to http://wirewalkersva.com/ - Job Openings, Job Leads and Job Connections! - Links to http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Job-Openings-Job-Leads-Job-1976445?home=&gid=1976445&trk=anet_ug_hm&goback=%2Emyg

Verification of information: - Number of Groups; largest Group; # of members on largest Group; date of start of the largest Group and Owner/Manager of the largest Group can be verified via the LinkedIn interface.

I am Peter Lee (the individual who created the LinkedIn Group described above) and I can assist in any verification of the above. Feel free to email me at pleehome@hotmail.com


--Plee888 (talk) 01:08, 26 February 2012 (UTC)

Sources[edit]

WhisperToMe (talk) 01:08, 8 June 2012 (UTC)

Advertising[edit]

The main ways in which LinkedIn makes money are through various types of ad opportunities and through levels of service. I think this should be added into the text somewhere.

This article talks about advertising and how it works: [1] FactZebra (talk) 13:21, 31 January 2013 (UTC)

I think that a significant amount of their revenue comes from services to recruiters which have been gaining in popularity. I need to find some supporting material before adding that, though. --User:Ceyockey (talk to me) 22:49, 1 August 2013 (UTC)

Security and Privacy Totally Nullified by Sign-Up Design, Only the Dumbest Should Apply.[edit]

As per sign up process for a newcomer, it is required to give full email address and its corresponding passwords. This allows LinkedIn to assess the account's address book directly to "suggest" people on the list to be invited to join the network. Needless to say, this level of authority is no different than the account's owner's, thus LinkedIn can log in, read, write, or change whatever with the email account. Only the dumbest of the dumb allows strangers to have the keys to his house, but this is how LinkedIn forces the signer to set up such! Use it at your expense!124.168.65.95 (talk) 22:35, 1 August 2013 (UTC)

This is not a requirement, but a tricky misconception of the interface which I've seen among many people over the past few months. --User:Ceyockey (talk to me) 22:48, 1 August 2013 (UTC)
In my case it was a requirement, definitely not a misconception. It wanted my email password, not any other so I did not proceed with that registration. For those who have several email accounts, one for private and one of those freebie ones that you only use for these networks it's probably alright, but keeping things separate can sometimes be confusing and a pain in the whatshisname. 144.136.192.10 (talk) 07:08, 12 September 2013 (UTC)
There should be a section in the article on privacy. This is definitely an area of concern with Linked-In. I don't have my -mail linked to them (they don't have my password), but if you do, it searches your contacts and e-mails, and any matches will show up in your list of recommended contacts, and apparently you will show up in those contacts' list of recommendations as well. Not good if that person is on less-than-amicable terms with you. Nerfer (talk) 16:26, 4 April 2014 (UTC)
Nerfer, I completely agree, which is why I thanked you for your comment in this section via WP:Echo much earlier today (April 13, 2014; non-Wikipedia time). Given the various complaints about LinkedIn's security when it comes to emails, as seen here and here on their own site, and the WP:Reliable sources out there that have reported on it, something about this should definitely be in the LinkedIn Wikipedia article. Flyer22 (talk) 00:51, 14 April 2014 (UTC)

Membership section[edit]

I'm not a Wikipedia member, so I'm not completely au fait with the editting policy.

The section states that there are 11 million members in Europe, with the Netherlands growing at the fastest rate (outside the US). The UK is quoted as having 4million members, but then later the figure is quoted as 11 million.

Could someone pick this up, and at least tidy the section so it isn't directly contradictory. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 77.86.70.217 (talk) 19:49, 20 August 2013 (UTC)

The lower figures were older; I deleted them in favor of the 2013 stats. -- Beland (talk) 19:59, 4 November 2013 (UTC)

Criticisms and controversies[edit]

LinkedIn's Wiki needs a "Criticisms and controversies" section (similar to Facebook's Wikipedia page [Wiki]), because currently this Wiki appears to have been written with bias, seeming like a LinkedIn representative wrote most of it.

The main topics to cover would be:

  • LinkedIn's use of email address mining. LinkedIn has been sued for accessing users' email addresses by requesting their email passwords, then using those passwords to access their email contact lists and sending join requests to those contacts [2].
  • LinkedIn's use of Site Wide Auto-Moderation (SWAM). This LinkedIn policy automatically blacklists users from LinkedIn groups and offers limited recourse for appeals when a user is wrongly blacklisted [3].
  • LinkedIn's use of “People You May Know” email solicitation. LinkedIn generates lists of people that non-users may know based on email addresses that they have mined and then creates join requests which appear to be from those people, even though those people may not even be LinkedIn users [4].


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