Talk:Liquid-crystal laser

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new sources[edit]

I found some new sources, but I am not sure they could be used in this article, so instead of adding the info directly to the article, I'd better post it here:

--Mbz1 (talk) 04:02, 27 April 2011 (UTC)

Questions[edit]

The questions below are copied from the talk page. I believe they should be here too:

--Mbz1 (talk) 16:32, 28 April 2011 (UTC)

--Mbz1 (talk) 16:46, 28 April 2011 (UTC)


Materialscientist (talk) 08:06, 26 April 2011 (UTC)

  • Present wording left me wondering if this is something that has been built or just a concept. Should be explicit. LeadSongDog come howl! 06:57, 29 April 2011 (UTC)

Fixed

"Electrical pumping" just means using an electric field to achieve population inversion instead of exciting the electrons with light. It is common in excimer lasers (strip away an electron from argon, and it becomes willing to bind metastably with fluorine, for instance), though I am not sure how much it is used for other types. Clearly this should be clarified. - 2/0 (cont.) 13:23, 29 April 2011 (UTC)
You need significant electron conductivity so that electrons can be accelerated by the field and transfer energy to the active medium. This is easy in gases and crystals. I was wondering how is it possible in liquid crystals (which are poor conductors). Materialscientist (talk) 13:30, 29 April 2011 (UTC)
"Self organization" is in contrast to building a layered metamaterial (added to lead now, but could probably stand to be clarified) - the liquid crystal is chosen with a structure corresponding to the desired wavelength.
They have been built, but so far as I know not on an industrial scale. The Mechanism section (better fit with the material than Theory, thanks; I started writing that as a real theory section, but found myself digressing too much into stuff that belongs at Photonic crystal) should present it as well-established, but the Applications section should be all speculative. - 2/0 (cont.) 13:23, 29 April 2011 (UTC)
  • If I understand correctly, an LCL is any laser using fluorescent loaded LC as the lasing medium. Hence the article could encompass not just one but a whole class of constructions with different cavities, tuning mechanisms, modulation schemes, gating, and so forth. LeadSongDog come howl! 13:38, 29 April 2011 (UTC)