Talk:List of Major League Baseball players who played in four decades

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Elmer Valo[edit]

There should be a footnote and/or cross-reference to the Elmer Valo article. Officially his debut was in 1940, but there is some speculation that he made a 1939 appearance that slipped through the statistical cracks.

An alternate, widely-accepred definition of "decade" reconginzes a zero-year as the ending rather than the starting point: i.e., the "sixties" were 1961-70 and not 1960-69. Valo (1940-61) qualifies under this viewpoint, as do a few others. Also, the players who retired in a "zero" year drop off the alternate list.

Of course, you can argue that 1963-1972 (for example) quite reasonably constitutes a decade, so that if you play fast and loose with the boundaries, anybody who plays slightly more than 20 years automatically touches four decades. WHPratt (talk) 14:03, 29 June 2013 (UTC)

--Zero Year Fallacy--

The widely-accepred (sic) zero year fallacy regularly pops up as a topic of heated debate whenever a century changes. Logic dictates that the zero year concludes the group of ten, rather than commences that group. Otherwise why do most people commence counting to ten with 1? If the widely-accepred (sic) method of counting is correct, then the entire population of earth has the wrong understanding of how to count to ten. Because the common calendar starts with year 1, its first full decade is the years 1 to 10, the second decade from 11 to 20, and so on.[5] So although the "1960s" comprises the years 1960 to 1969, the "197th decade" spans 1961 to 1970. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decade) Note the following;

--Nick Altrock-- -- played in five decades (to date -- the only man to do so)

--Mickey Vernon-- -- played for 22 years across parts of three decades (the 30s, 40s, and 50s). He finished his career in 1960 -- the last year of the 50th decade of the 20th Century

--Ted Williams-- -- played for 22 years across parts of three decades (the 30s, 40s, and 50s). He finished his career in 1960 -- the last year of the 50th decade of the 20th Century

--Minnie Miñoso-- -- is touted as having played in five decades, but his career spanned 32 years across four decades (40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s)

--Tim McCarver-- -- played for 22 years across parts of three decades (the 50s, 60s, and 70s). He finished his career in 1980 -- the last year of the 70th decade of the 20th Century

--Willie McCovey-- -- played for 22 years across parts of three decades (the 50s, 60s, and 70s). He finished his career in 1980 -- the last year of the 70th decade of the 20th Century

--Bill Buckner-- -- played for 22 years across parts of three decades (the 60s, 70s, and 80s). He finished his career in 1990 -- the last year of the 80th decade of the 20th Century

--Jerry Reuss-- -- played for 22 years across parts of three decades (the 60s, 70s, and 80s). He finished his career in 1990 -- the last year of the 80th decade of the 20th Century

--Ken Griffey, Jr.-- -- played for 22 years across parts of three decades (the 80s, 90s, and 00s). He finished his career in 2010 -- the last year of the first decade of the 21st Century

This is baseball. Getting the stats correct is part of the game. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 110.74.195.250 (talk) 00:33, 3 March 2015 (UTC)