Talk:List of Sega arcade system boards

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Incomplete[edit]

We need to finish this list. There's still some boards missing. Red Phoenix (Talk) 20:12, 27 March 2008 (UTC)

Yeah...I see that Sega's Aurora board isn't on the list, and that one is relatively the same age as Lindberg. Also...would Sammy's Atomiswave count? I mean, Sega did merge with Sammy, the board was released after the merger, and it is based on Dreamcast hardware (which itself was based on NAOMI hardware). Therealspiffyone (talk) 18:09, 11 April 2008 (UTC)
Additionally, each board should have a list of games that used it. Kouban (talk) 03:05, 8 November 2008 (UTC)

Europa-R CPU[edit]

Well, we all know there is no Pentium Dual-Core with 3.4 GHz, so does anyone have reliable information what CPU it really is? I guess it would be either a Pentium D (although that would be a dumb choice) or a Core 2 Duo. -- Darklock (talk) 11:38, 28 July 2008 (UTC)

  • I'd suggest it was Pentium D 945, which was going very cheap around its EOL (under $100, which was considerably cheaper than Core Duo); besides, Pentiums D were popularily referred to as "dual-core Pentium" long before Intel intoduced that nameplate, and that's probably the source of confusion. I've changed the specifications. --83.167.100.36 (talk) 19:00, 29 September 2009 (UTC)

Categories[edit]

I was just reading the Namco system board page and noticed it had some categories so I've added something similar here. I hope I did it right?WorkingBeaver (talk) 10:55, 26 August 2008 (UTC)

Sega Model 2 section[edit]

It says:

This, combined with the fact that some games were available for both 2A-CRX and 2B-CRX, led to the reverse engineering of the Model 2 and Model 2A-CRX DSPs.

Is there a source for this claim? WorkingBeaver (talk) 12:38, 13 September 2008 (UTC)

Triforce?[edit]

Apologies if I missed conseus, but why is Triforce redirected here? It's processor is based on the GameCube, a Nintendo system, with some based on Sega, but why here? Only some of the games for it are even from Sega. Magiciandude (talk) 07:25, 3 January 2009 (UTC)

Agreed, it should be placed in the Nintendo GameCube article. - The New Age Retro Hippie used Ruler! Now, he can figure out the length of things easily. 00:03, 7 February 2009 (UTC)

Model 3 = last Sega custom board?[edit]

Can the Model 3 is also last Sega board to use custom design rather than a PC/console derivative?Junk Police (talk) 13:13, 28 January 2009 (UTC)

Ring Edge / Ring Wide[edit]

Here [1] are the specs of Sega's new boards. If you can read Japanese, please translate the information and add it to the article. -- Stormwatch (talk) 12:20, 22 February 2009 (UTC)

Sega System 8?[edit]

Doing my research on what the name of the arcade board Wonder Boy in Monster Land ran on, I keep seeing "Sega System 8" on sites like KLOV and Classics Arcade Database. I'm guessing this board has a relation to the System 2 board (which I see Wonder Boy in Monster Land and similar games also listed under such as here, here, and even here) or if this is a matter of different nomenclature for the same board. Obviously, the specs are nearly identical to that of the System 1 and 2 boards. Can anyone clarify on this? –MuZemike 20:29, 17 August 2010 (UTC)

NEC V60 is not a RISC[edit]

Wikipedia`s own page on the V60 identifies it as a CISC. Looking at the V60 user`s manual I think it is pretty clear that it is not RISC. 74.65.127.127 (talk) 22:34, 15 January 2011 (UTC)

Suicide Battery?[edit]

The system 18 entry mentions a suicide battery and refers readers to system 16. Neither entry explains what the suicide battery is. 209.40.220.251 (talk) 02:43, 17 November 2011 (UTC)

Jaybee77 (talk) 22:51, 30 November 2011 (UTC) Lindbergh last game Jaybee77 (talk) 22:51, 30 November 2011 (UTC) Text in article: The last game to run on Lindbergh was MJ4 Evolution.[31] The last game on Lindbergh was Answer X Answer Live on Lindbergh Red in 2010 [1]

To clarify, "suicide battery" generally refers to an arrangement by which encryption keys or other vital data are stored in SRAM powered by a battery. When the battery dies, the PCB is rendered permanently inoperable, in the sense that there is no way to reprogram the RAM from within the PCB itself — hence the term "suicide."
Actually clarifying the technical details in the article remains TODO. SoledadKabocha (talk) 05:09, 29 September 2012 (UTC)

System 24 CD-ROMs?[edit]

I think the alleged CD-ROM capability of System 24 may be a myth. At least, none of the System 24 games known to the MAME project use CD storage. Does anyone know of evidence that there were System 24 PCBs officially released with CD-ROMs? SoledadKabocha (talk) 05:09, 29 September 2012 (UTC)

This appears to have been resolved by this edit, which removed the mention of CDs. --SoledadKabocha (talk) 17:47, 24 September 2013 (UTC)

Chihiro Upgradeable RAM[edit]

The RAM has been proven to be 128MB, twice that of the Xbox but in no way upgradeable. All the upgrade options simply refer to the GD-ROM DIMM Board which can go up to 1GB on the Chihiro. --86.169.168.185 (talk) 18:26, 20 January 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ Reference: http://am-show.sega.jp/aou11/lineup/ananl/index.html