Talk:List of academic ranks

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Section for Russia[edit]

The section for Russia is a complete non-sense. E.g., there is not such a thing at all as assistant professor. Also it is not clear what is what, as there is no standard translation. It should refer to Russian names of positions. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.96.104.206 (talk) 18:10, 2 May 2011 (UTC)

Subdivision of undergraduates[edit]

I wonder, should one include the US terms for undergraduate students: freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior? Or would that be irrelevant, plain wrong, or going too far (down the ranks)? In Norway, btw, we just call those people Nth year students. --Wernher 22:53, 10 Jun 2004 (UTC)

And in Britain, although first years are informally referred to as "freshers". -- Necrothesp 20:48, 31 Mar 2005 (UTC)
The word "freshman" originated in England, and I think may have died out there while continuing in use in America. If they're now using the word "fresher" in that way, I wonder if in the last few decades they re-imported "freshman" from America and then corrupted it into "fresher"? Michael Hardy 21:13, 31 Mar 2005 (UTC)
I don't think so. It's not a new thing. British universities have used the term "fresher" since at least the late 19th century. -- Necrothesp 01:34, 1 Apr 2005 (UTC)
This page is about accademic rank: only a senior (final year) doing his thesis/dissertation, industrial placement student (UK) or summerjob/parttime job students work in labs not all students, in particular freshmin (most researcher would not trust a freshmin to get coffee or pizza). --Squidonius (talk) 12:59, 6 May 2008 (UTC)

Department Head vs Department Chair in the US[edit]

I was not aware of the distinction suggested by the article between "Department Head" as an elected position and "Department Chair" as an appointed one. Is there any reference to back the article's claim ? 200.177.29.149 23:49, 26 July 2007 (UTC)

Suggest removal of "frosh" from Canada section[edit]

I've been a student at Canadian universities for longer than I like to think about, and I've never, ever, heard the term "frosh" used for first-year students, casually or formally. We don't tend to use "freshman," "sophomore," etc., either, but "frosh" in particular strikes me as a strong Americanism. Never been to school back east, but I know many people who have, and they don't use the term either.142.36.71.172 22:32, 8 August 2007 (UTC)

I am inclined to agree with the above statement. I have never heard the term "frosh" used to describe first-year students in Canada. In fact, to the best of my knowledge, "frosh" is only used to describe a combination freshman-sophomore athletic program in the U.S. Toropop (talk) 02:47, 25 June 2010 (UTC)

Article title[edit]

Wouldn't List of academic ranks be a more appropriate page title given it is just a list? Wongm (talk) 16:08, 20 June 2008 (UTC)

Possible reference[edit]

I notice that this page doesn't have much in the way of supporting references. Here's a possible source if anyone wants it: http://www.iue.it/MaxWeberProgramme/AcademicCareers/AcademicCareers.shtml —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.83.222.100 (talk) 16:22, 12 February 2009 (UTC)

PhD required?[edit]

Could you people help in clarifying which of these ranks requires a PhD? For a few of the countries listed, this is stated, but not all. And to my best understanding, not all the titles listed in this article do require a doctoral degree. AmirOnWiki (talk) 17:31, 4 September 2010 (UTC)

Capitalization of foreign job titles[edit]

Various capitalization styles were in place in this article so I made a pass to bring all the English titles into line with our manual of style as it pertains to titles. Basically, Wikipedia views titles as common nouns unless they precede a person's name where they are seen as part of the name and thus become proper names. I didn't change the orthography of any foreign terms (e.g. Rektor, Profesora) since I'm not sure how we should deal with them. For example, the Egypt section use all upper case for the local terms. I lean towards treating anything written in a Roman alphabet the same as we do in English and leaving everything else (e.g. Cyrillic, Kanji, Chinese) as is. I'd appreciate input on that. Jojalozzo 00:16, 10 August 2012 (UTC)

Is format standardization desirable?[edit]

Some sections have the local title first followed by the English translation and notes. Some have the English term followed by the local term followed by notes. Some just have the English term without a local term. Various punctuation styles are used also (colons, commas, dashes) to separate the components of each entry. Would it improve the article if there were more consistency from section to section? If so, is there a section we can use as a model and can we extract a set of simple guidelines to help new editors work here without making more work for others? Jojalozzo 00:16, 10 August 2012 (UTC)