Talk:Load management

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Proposed Improvements[edit]

  • I think an improvement would be to have a "jargon" dictionary. If you see an industry jargon word, perhaps you can add it to my list below:

-- Dispatchable Load

--68.89.149.2 20:34, 30 August 2007 (UTC)

Good point. My impression is that it is like 'delta VA' or the amount of 'capacity' that a systems operator has control over or can vary at any one time. I don't know about today, but many years ago electric clocks could have lost as much as a second or more towards the end of the days period of maximum demand, and then slowly catch up again during the periods of low demand.
This is also why, I suppose, heavy users had to have a car-sized capacitor on there main step-down transformer so as to reduce the tendency of hundreds of rotating motors running in factories, from slowing down the speed of the big rotors in the power stations (a phenomenon called 'phase lag' I seem to recall).
Factories kept their mechanical 'clocking in' clocks until 'standard time' referenced synchronised electric 'clocking in clock' systems were developed.
In some countries, the load control is so bad that voltage regulators are needed if you wish to watch television; and even then the picture goes smaller and larger all the time. The regulators are sometimes just simple solenoids moving a contact arm along a rheostat. In north America one needs UPS's on PC's so that the spiky mains does not keep crashing them. In Europe however, the PC's power supplies own smoothing capacitors are sufficient for their already smooth and well regulated supplies.
Inserting some explanations along these lines might help in getting across why it is important in a 'non technical' way.
If someone can remember how, starting with a singe rely, all of New York got blacked out a few decades ago, that too, would show the dangers of a poorly built system. --Aspro 13:56, 31 August 2007 (UTC)

load control in fridges and dishwashers[edit]

these may be worth mentioning....at http://www.claverton-energy.com/energy-experts-library/downloads/energy

 rltec-load-management-demand-control-by-frequency2.pdf» 1.5 MiB -  Part2 - A system to be fitted to domestic appliances - fridges - dishwashers etc to allow the automatic switching off of devices when the frequency of the grid drops. Estimated to be 500 MW available of such load response in the UK. Effectively such an automatic load control system behaves as energy storage. Detailed description of various grid related issues. load curves etc.
 rltec-load-management-demand-control-by-frequency1a.pdf» 1.9 MiB -

Part1 - A system to be fitted to domestic appliances - fridges - dishwashers etc to allow the automatic switching off of devices when the frequency of the grid drops. Estimated to be 500 MW available of such load response in the UK. Effectively such an automatic load control system behaves as energy storage. Detailed description of various grid related issues. load curves etc. Engineman (talk) 13:09, 11 December 2008 (UTC)

Whilst interesting, I think this falls into Wikipedia:What_Wikipedia_is_not#Wikipedia_is_not_a_crystal_ball and therefor not really suitable for inclusion in the article. --Aspro (talk) 18:16, 11 December 2008 (UTC)
On the contrary, the technique described in these pdfs is already covered in WP: Dynamic demand (electric power). Bad use of the crystal ball principle. This is existing technology that is forming a major portion of government policy proposals regarding Smart grids in the US and the EU. -J JMesserly (talk) 23:48, 24 December 2008 (UTC)

Cleaned up the UK scheme section[edit]

It originally started with "In the UK night storage heaters, a crude, much despised heating device..." which may have been vandalism and the rest of the section didn't make much sense either.

The bit that says "night storage heaters are used to increase the load by about 5 GW to accommodate the nuclear programme" is not mentioned in the reference so this part may need to be removed. It also states "These can also be remotely switched using BBC Radio 4 Longwave Radio teleswitch." I am not sure if this was referring to the diesel generators or the night store heaters. --Jwntr (talk) 10:07, 25 January 2010 (UTC)

Merger proposal[edit]

I propose that Load control be merged into Load management. Right now they're both basically talking about the same thing, even through load control is really just about methods to accomplish load management. The article on load control mentions a little more about the technology and load management a little more about the history and examples, but I don't see any huge differences.

Originally I proposed a merger in the opposite direction, but now think this is the best way to go.

-nstannik (talk) 08:40, 22 June 2011 (UTC)