Talk:Louis Comfort Tiffany

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Bing Request[edit]

can someone add coverage of Tiffany's relationship with Bing? It seems pretty important to his introduction.

ref: http://19thc-artworldwide.org/summer_05/articles/eide.html
ref: http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0PAL/is_516_161/ai_n13628908
Jeffme 05:20, 12 November 2006 (UTC)

Family[edit]

l.c. tiffany was my grandfather i miss him! im 94 years old! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.160.145.90 (talkcontribs)

Corporate Successors[edit]

Does anyone know the difference between Tiffany & Co. and the Louis C. Tiffany Studios. I think some mention should be made of the studios in the article. --evrik 14:52, 18 May 2006 (UTC)

  • Tiffany & Company was founded by the father of Louis Comfort Tiffany, and continues operation in the famous Fifth Avenue (New York City) store, commonly known as Tiffany's, as in "Breakfast at Tiffany's". Protzy 23:55, 21 August 2006 (UTC)

Louis Comfort Tiffany, II[edit]

I don't think that Louis Comfort Tiffany, II, son of Louis Comfort Tiffany existed. The child, twin of Julia De Forest Tiffany, b. Sep 24, 1877 was Louise Comfort Tiffany, a daughter. Here is more information -

1421w.xxxxx.x5. (daughter) Louise Comfort TIFFANY, b. Sep 24, 1887, NYC, NY; d. 1974; m. 1911, Rodman Drake DeKay Gilder (b. 1877; d. 1953), son of Richard Watson Gilder and Helena De Kay. Author. Scribner’s Monthly. 1881, Editor, Century Illustrated Monthly

1421w.xxxxx.x5x. (g-son) Richard Watson GILDER, b. m. Anne Spring Denny Alsop.

1421w.xxxxx.x5xx. (gg-son)George Franklin GILDER, b. 1939. Supply side Economist. Author. “Wealth and Poverty”. NOTABLE*. The Gilder Technology Report.

1421w.xxxxx.x5y. (g-dau)Helena DeKay GILDER, b. 1814 (c); d. Apr 6, 2001, age 87, at her home, Mitchell, MD, memorial service, Jun 22, 2001, Tyringham Union Church, Tyringham, MA; m. Alfred Amasa Miller, Jr. She became an MD. Lived Upper Montclair, NJ and Tyringham, MA.

(gg-s)son MILLER, III, m. _____ Augusto.

(gg-s) Rodman Gilder MILLER. Glass Artist. Seattle. Owner of Rodman Gilder Miller Glass Studio and Neon by Neuron, since 1989.

2929 Mayfair Avenue North • Seattle WA 98109 • (206) 283-3164 • rodman@rodmanstudio.com Protzy 00:02, 22 August 2006 (UTC)

An IP editor changed two pieces of information in the above. I reverted, but I note the changes here in case my reversion was incorrect (changes are bolded and italicized):

1421w.xxxxx.x5y. (g-dau)Helena DeKay GILDER, b. 1913 (c); d. Apr 6, 2001, age 87, at her home, Mitchell, MD, memorial service, Jun 22, 2001, Tyringham Union Church, Tyringham, MA; m. Alfred Amasa Miller, Jr. She became an MD. Lived Upper Montclair, NJ and Tyringham, MA.

1421w.xxxxx.x5y. (g-dau)Helena DeKay GILDER, b. 1814 (c); d. Apr 6, 2001, age 87, at her home, Mitchell, MD, memorial service, Jun 22, 2001, Tyringham Union Church, Tyringham, MA; m. Alfred Amasa Miller, Jr. She became an MD. Lived Upper Montclair, NJ and Tyringham, MA.

(gg-s) Amasa MILLER, III, m. Mirella Augusto.

Beyond My Ken (talk) 03:05, 3 May 2011 (UTC)

Inaccuracies[edit]

"Tiffany used opalescent glass in a variety of colors and textures to create a unique style of stained glass. This can be contrasted with the method of painting in glass paint or enamels on colorless glass that had been the dominant method of creating stained glass for several hundred years in Europe. Use of the colored glass itself to create stained glass pictures was motivated by the ideals of the Arts and Crafts movement and its leader William Morris in England."

I don't know where this misinformation came from, but it needs correcting!

  • Yes, painting on glass was common in the 17th and 18th centuries. But this article ignores the fact that there had been a revival in the art of stained glass manufacture in England, France, Germany and the Netherlands, prompted by Gothic Revival movement, which began sometime in the late 1700s. By 1850 There were literally dozens of stained glass designers and manufacturers in England alone.
  • William Morris did not revive the making of stained glass, and he was certainly not the first to start hand-crafted glass manufacture. Neither was Tiffany, regardless of the implication of the paragraph above. One of the earliest makers of "Medieval" type hand-made glass for window production was James Powell of Whitefriars, at 15 years before Tiffany came on the scene and more than twenty years before Tiffany started manufacture.
  • The stained glass manufactures of England, Wailes, Hardman, Clayton and Bell, Lavers Barraud and Westlake, and several others had great expertise in utilising coloured glass for effect. And were doing so in the 1840s, 1850s and 1860s. The did paint the features on the faces, and they did paint folds in robes, annd the certainly painted medieval-style borders, canopies etc. But the did not paint colour onto glass, except "silver stain" which is very effective at giving a bright yellow colour and hhad been so used ever since the 13th century.
  • And if you look at Tiffany's figurative works, of course you will see that he also painted the details of the faces.
  • Tiffany was inded an innovator. But what Tiffany achieved needs to be put in context.

By the time Tiffany comenced work, he had seen Hardman. He had seen Clayton and Bell. The tradition that Tiffany broke away from was not "painting in glass paint or enamels on colorless glass that had been the dominant method of creating stained glass for several hundred years in Europe" as it says in this article.

The tradition from which Tiffany departed was the Gothic Revival movement, spurred on in England by the presence of about 60 mighty Medieval Cathedrals and Abbeys, and countless medieval churches, every single one of which required restoration. The US lacked this tradition. They did not need 100 stained glass firms each capable of reproducing medieval windows. Tiffany could take whatever direction he chose, with very little constraint.

See also:

--Amandajm 10:00, 19 January 2007 (UTC)

White House renovation[edit]

Something needs to be said about Tiffany's renovation of the White House in 1882. He put Tiffany glass in the windows and generally plastered Gilded Age ornamentation all over the mansion. It was all removed by Charles McKim's Georgian restoration for TR in 1902. If nothing else, this will serve as a reminder to add it myself when I have a chance. --Tysto 14:03, 28 August 2007 (UTC)

Tiffany's art elsewhere. Apart from Paris, there is also a beautiful stained glass window in the little church of Kimbleton, near Cambridge, UK.

[edit]

One the New York Yankees Web Site, there is a story that Tiffany designed the interlocking NY logo used today by the New York Yankees. Originally, I edited this biography to mention that, but upon further research, I became convinced that the Yankees account of this is mostly inaccurate. It is true that the Tiffany company did design the first known interlocking NY logo for a police medal awarded in 1877. The Yankee web site is also wrong on that account too, since it says that that officer was the first NYPD officer shot in the line of duty, but he was not. The Tiffany company did indeed design the medal, but Tiffany himself most likely did not design it himself. Furthermore, interlocking letters were common in baseball logos in the early twentieth century, and there is no material evidence that the Police medal itself was the influence behind the Yankees moving to an interlocking NY. Indeed many other teams at that time were experimenting with interlocking letters on the uniforms, and the Yankees and the New York Giants had been experimenting them like other clubs.[1] —Preceding unsigned comment added by Kops2222 (talkcontribs) 14:11, 20 June 2010 (UTC)

[edit]

I've removed the information on the Yankee logo from the article, since, after some pretty extensive research, it's not at all clear to me that "Louis B. Tiffany", who is credited with creating the interlocking NY for an award given to the first NYPD officer shot in the line of duty, is the same person as "Louis Comfort Tiffany", the famous jewelry and glass designer. The strongest evidence that they are not the same is that at the time given for the creation of the logo, 1877, Louis Comfort Tiffany was 29 years old and still in the process of learning his trade as a glassmaker; there's no indication that he had a reputation at the time. The similarity of names is not unusual: large familieis at this time frequently re-used names a lot, and the fact that Louis Comfort Tiffany is generally referred to in that way, i.e. Louis Comfort Tiffany, is a pretty good indication that he needed to differentiate himself from another "Louis Tiffany." Tiffany & Co. was a going concern at that time, and it's not unlikely that Louis B. Tiffany was a relative of Charles Lewis Tiffany, possibly one that worked for the family company.

In any case, there's no evidence whatsoever that I can find that Louis Comfort Tiffany designed the logo, which in all references I can find is credited to Louis B. Tiffany. Absent something that shows these are the same person, the information should not be re-added to the article. Beyond My Ken (talk) 14:58, 2 July 2010 (UTC)

I failed to note the comment above, which undermines the logo info from another direction. Beyond My Ken (talk) 14:59, 2 July 2010 (UTC)

Image addition[edit]

Brooklyn Museum - Duane Street, New York - Louis Comfort Tiffany - overall

An editor has been attempting to add the image on the right to the article. I've left a comment on their talk page [1] explaining that we don't need to add every image we have on a subject to the subject's article, and that images should be evaluated for their quality and what they add to the article, but the editor has reverted my removal and restored the image.

There are a number of problems with this image. First, it needs to be clean up for visibility, but that is relatively easy to do; second, it would need to be displayed at a relatively large size in order to be visually accessible by the reader, which would make it out of scale with the rest of the images; and last, and most important, I do not see that it adds anything particualarly interesting to the article, since we already have one painting by Tiffany, and Tiffany was not at all notable as a painter. For these reasons I oppose the addition of this image to the article. Beyond My Ken (talk) 19:37, 31 May 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ http://baseballresearcher.blogspot.com/2010/03/that-famous-yankees-logo.html