Talk:Luciferians

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Luciferians is a term applied to two separate groups in opposition to the Roman Catholic Church

Historically this may have been correct, but there are still people who call themselves "Luciferians" that have nothing to do with Roman Catholicism per se.

The first was a schismatic group named after Lucifer, Bishop of Calaris (Cagliari in Sardinia) in the late 4th century. It is linked to the complex political machinations involving the emperor Constantius and Pope Liberius. Lucifer also had links with the Arian heresy. The movement died out early in the following century. For Orthdoxus's Dialogue against the Luciferians from circa the year 376 see http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3005.htm

Referring to Arians as a "heresy" is not a very NPOV. It was only heretical to people who disagreed with their theology, or Christology. The main "heretical" aspect of Arian doctrine (named after Arius) was that they were (literally) unitarians, ie. they denied the doctrine of the Trinity.

Various gnostic Luciferian sects have also been associated with the image of Lucifer, in the root sense of the bringer of light. The orthodox view is to associate Lucifer with "Satan before the fall".

"Orthodox" according to whom? This interpretation would have been considered spurious and very unorthodox prior to the Jerome translation that put Lucifer into Isaiah in the first place.

Others link Lucifer with Prometheus who stole light (wisdom?) from the gods to bring to man. These sects have had persistent groups of followers since the middle ages.

Prometheus is generally said to have stolen fire, not light. Light would be only one of the benefits of fire.

Since mentioning Gnosticism and Lucifer, the author could have also tied in the Ophites, who viewed the Serpent in the Garden of Eden as a liberator of mankind; and both the serpent and fire are said to have been dominant symbols in their rites. see http://www.themystica.com/mystica/articles/o/ophites.html

RL Barrett 18:26 May 6, 2003 (UTC)