Talk:Luyten's Star

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Coordinates[edit]

The majority of websites say Luyten's Star is in Monoceros, while some, such as the one linked at the bottom, say Canis Minor, which appears to be correct. The coordinates listed in all major sources, which are 07h 27m 25s, +05° 13′ 33″, are clearly within Canis Minor in the Cambridge Star Atlas, on Wikipedia maps or other sources. These coordinates place the star almost due west of Procyon and due south of Beta Canis Minoris, forming a triangle clearly within Canis Minor. If the declination was actually -05° instead of +05° it would be in Monoceros, but all major references say +05°.

Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope website: [1]

Lyuten catalog designation?[edit]

I'm really surprised that a star named "Luyten's Star" doesn't have a Luyten catalog designation, like Luyten 726-8 does. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rogermw (talkcontribs) 20:35, 19 August 2009 (UTC)

Those designations are now obsolete and replaced by LHS, LFT and LTT. --Yigor (talk) 00:42, 22 April 2010 (UTC)

Apparent magnitude of Procyon from Luyten's Star.[edit]

By my arithmetic Procyon's apparent magnitude as seen from Luyten's star would be about -4.5.

If the difference in magnitudes from the absolute magnitude is n, then for a position 1.2 light years away,

n*log(100^0.2)=log((1.2/32)^2) which gives n as -7.12 magnitudes from the absolute magnitude (at 10 parsecs, about 32 light years distant). Wikipedia gives Procyon's absolute magnitude as 2.65, so the apparent magnitude of Procyon from Luyten's star would be 2.65+(-7.12) = -4.47. Still impressively bright.

I suspect the author forgot to take Procyon's absolute magnitude into account.

132.3.33.68 (talk) 20:46, 12 January 2011 (UTC) Steven K. Smith