Talk:Magnitogorsk

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comment[edit]

I seem to recall Magnitogorsk being used in economics textbooks as an example of central planning. Apparently, in capitalist countries, large smelting complexes have always been located near rivers, as the water is used in the steel production process and barges are an economical way to move out the steel. Magnitogorsk lacks a river and has always been an extremely expensive place to produce steel as a result. Supposedly, production there entails massive waste of resources that would never have been tolerated in a capitalist country. I have no source on this, so I am not putting it in the text of the entry. Can anybody verify? Uucp 14:15, 15 August 2005 (UTC)

Sounds likely, as a vast water supply is a pretty key ingredient in steelmaking, but would you want to be the one who says "no, that won't work" to Stalin? (See Hotel Moskva (Moscow)...)
I mentioned in the article that Pittsburg was used as a benchmark/inspiration when building the city, as it was the most advanced steel production center in the world at the time. This is not something that you will find mentioned in the propaganda of the time, but I can grab a textbook citation or two if needed.  ProhibitOnions  (T) 16:11, 22 July 2006 (UTC)
Please do reference it. FWIW the Pandora's Box - Ep 1 - The Engineer's Plot says it was based on Gary, Indiana.WolfKeeper (talk) 06:15, 22 November 2007 (UTC)

Question?[edit]

Magnitogorsk belongs to which continent, Europe or Asia? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 206.224.28.70 (talk) 14:16, 9 May 2007 (UTC).

As it is located to the east of the Urals, it is considered to be in Asia.—Ëzhiki (Igels Hérissonovich Ïzhakoff-Amursky) • (yo?); 14:40, 9 May 2007 (UTC)

Magnitogorsk is the largest city in Russia which does not serve as an administrative center of either a federal subject or an administrative division. Incorrect. The largest city of this kind is Tol'yatti (Togliatti) in Samara region, with population of 700000. Magnitogorsk is only the second largest one.

Inland steel[edit]

Yes. I can only think of one other moderately large 20th century steel town without water transport, which was in central Utah. It was one of the first victims of cheap steel from waterside smelters in Asia in the 1960s. The ingredients need heavy transport, and the main reason to pay the high price of land transport is war. Peace is deadly to landlocked steel. Jim.henderson 06:00, 9 July 2007 (UTC)

Wartime output[edit]

(Moving this discussion out of the article. Relaxing 12:01, 12 July 2007 (UTC) )

(Half of all Soviet tanks and a third of all projectiles were made there.)(Looks like a confusion with Chelyabinsk. --Viacheslav Kulikov 22:43, 8 July 2007 (UTC))

Urban Myth[edit]

I've heard it said that the original metal mountain attracted a disproportionate amount of lightning strikes. Is ther any validity in this or is it urban myth —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ihavesevenkids (talkcontribs) 14:33, 3 September 2008 (UTC)

Magnitogorsk had water source[edit]

Peharps little better look in the map. River Ural flows just in the middle of Magnitogorsk. The river divides the town in European and Asian halves. The population lives mainly on the European side of the town and huge plants are located in Asian side. Peharps the only town in the world which have an electric tramway system running in two continents. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.115.117.60 (talk) 10:04, 10 February 2009 (UTC)

filmmaker[edit]

what was the name of the Dutch filmmaker that made a film in the 1930s about the construction of a second blast furnace supervised by the Komsomol? 81.68.255.36 (talk) 17:24, 10 May 2010 (UTC)

Nevermind, Joris Ivens 81.68.255.36 (talk) 18:01, 11 May 2010 (UTC)