Talk:Malkuth

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Sorry but this article is way off. What happened to Malchus as the leadership of G-d over our world, of 'eyn melech blo am', of malchus is memalei kol almin... —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.247.46.144 (talk) 16:53, 2 October 2009 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the proposal was no consensus. --BDD (talk) 19:17, 8 January 2014 (UTC)

MalkuthMalchut – Recasting this from an uncontested to a contested move. Musashiaharon was the original proposer. Relisted. BDD (talk) 19:32, 17 December 2013 (UTC) Herostratus (talk) 07:39, 4 December 2013 (UTC)

  • Support as proposer. I have never seen this pronounced as "Malkuth". I can admit the "th" phoneme at the end, but not the hard "k". When written in vowellized Hebrew or Aramaic, it is invariably with a soft "ch"/"kh". For example, see Patach Eliyahu from Tikkunei Zohar as printed in Siddurim Al Pi Nusach HaArizal and Sefardi Siddurim where it is מלכות with no dagesh in the כ. Also, in Psalms 118:25, מלכות appears without a dagesh. Musashiaharon (talk) 23:18, 27 November 2012 (UTC)
  • Question, if that's true then why does Google Ngram give "Malkuth" as being far more common, at all times? (see here.) Unless there's another meaning for "Malkuth" I'd not be able to support the move, absent some other good reason to do so.
Google gives examples of both spellings. "Malchut" outnumbers "Malkut" 131,000 to 85,000, although Google numbers are said to not mean much. Britannica spells it "Malkut", describing it as an Aramaic term. I wonder if that's where the discrepancy arises, that we're actually using an Aramaic term and not a direct transliteration from the Hebrew? Above my pay grade though.
Google Books also gives many examples of each. To my completely untrained eye, neither the books using "Malkuth" nor those using "Malchut" seem way more scholarly than the other. I guess I'd have to go with the Ngram results. Herostratus (talk) 07:48, 4 December 2013 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.