Talk:Mange

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Cats mange[edit]

do cats get mange?

  • Apparently so. I just went to askjeeves.com and typed "do cats get mange?" and a bunch of pages popped up talking about mange in cats. Elf | Talk 04:21, 30 September 2005 (UTC)
Yes they do. I added some cat material under Demodex. --Caroldermoid (talkcontribs) 00:26, 18 November 2006 (UTC)
  • Cats do indeed get mange, and sometimes cause themselves fatal damage/infection from scratching. Some very sad cat pictures here:

http://mangecure.info/Mange/mansym_MangeSymptoms.html Detailed information on using oral Ivermectin in adult cats here: http://mangecure.info/Mange/manovr_DoingItOverAgain.html Full disclosure - mangecure.info is my site, completely free. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.125.169.194 (talk) 00:11, 30 March 2011 (UTC)

1.87% horse ivermectin paste (the stuff described above) can also be used topically (directly on the skin) of cats, if you dilute it 1:187 in mineral oil (which dissolves the paste and the ivermectin). Even better is 1:100 dilution of the 1% ivermectin (IVOMEC) sold in feed stores to ranchers as an injectable for cattle and swine. Either of these products diluted with mineral oil produces 0.01% ivermectin (1 part in 10,000) in mineral oil, basically a generic for the otic product for ear mites in cats (Acarexx). Then apply the stuff to the skin of the cat everywhere there are scabs/crusts on the ears, head, inside the ears, and the back of the neck. Usually it's not necessary to apply anywhere else, but you can if you stay below a 4 mL dose on skin/coat that the cat can lick. I have yet to see toxicity. This stuff can be used on any cat with ear-problems (just squirt into the ear and massage the liquid down into the ear canal) and on any cat with crusted lesions that are suspected of being mange or even ringworm (a lot of "ringworm" in cats is actually mange, which is much easier to treat). The oily stuff makes the hair of the animal look pretty matted for a few days but doesn't hurt it, and it eventually is washed/licked off. You can reapply in a couple of weeks after existing crusts/scabs have had a chance to come off and heal. It might take 2 or 3 applications for a bad case, but it beats anything else for cat mange and mites, and is almost without expense. WARNING: I am not a vet. Such suggestions for cheap do-it yourself topical animal care won't cause your pet have seizures, but may cause your vet to have seizures. SBHarris 01:11, 30 March 2011 (UTC)

does mange kill?[edit]

Will Mange cause a dog to bleed out of it's backside and kill it?

Wikipedia is not a discussion forum. ask your vet. Skiendog (talk) 04:53, 4 September 2009 (UTC)
true but maybe these questions should be answered in the article? Killemall22 (talk) 22:36, 11 November 2011 (UTC)
No. --Joelmills 02:02, 24 July 2006 (UTC)
Kill? yes, but not from bleeding. The animal sometimes can scratch until a open sores occur. Infection is what really kills. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.131.3.177 (talk) 04:34, 13 February 2011 (UTC)
Mange can kill. If the local shelter picks up a mangy animal, they'll kill it even faster. SBHarris 00:22, 12 November 2011 (UTC)

Addition of a treatment section[edit]

It seems like it would be appropriate to add a treatment section including how mange can be treated. Such a section should include any dips that are appropriate, and also the common use of ivermectin. Any veterinarians willing to do this? -EvanGrim

Agreed. I added treatment sections. --Caroldermoid (talkcontribs) 00:26, 18 November 2006 (UTC)


If a human were to contract this itchy mite from a cat or dog how would it be treated?

See scabies. Demodex is not contagious to humans. --Joelmills 23:51, 2 December 2006 (UTC)

What about including some info on methods of prevention, such as diet, etc.? 24.19.61.116 04:58, 22 December 2006 (UTC) just a dog guy

Hi Is there a permanent cure for mange, amd what are the chances of another adult dog contracting it from a younger dog? Visninvrse 17:08, 15 August 2007 (UTC)

Which type of mange are you asking about, demodectic or sarcoptic? --Joelmills 03:25, 16 August 2007 (UTC)
i think we hould include an answer for both Killemall22 (talk) 22:41, 11 November 2011 (UTC)
Also i feel like the treatment section is too short. they don't really speak on what happens to the skin after treatment. with the fur grow back, how long does it generally take etc. is any one able to speak to these subjects? Killemall22 (talk) 22:41, 11 November 2011 (UTC)

Both types of mange are caused by mites, and the treatments for both are the same, and vary only due to the toxicity of a few things on some host animals, but not others. There is no permanent cure (see scabies) since animals (and people) can always be reinfected. Anything topically that kills mites will work. Sulfur cremes are available on the internet, and can be used on any pet. Lime sulfur solution/dip must be used diluted from the concentrate 1:16 or it harms the skin (even then it stinks) but also can be used on any pet. Most things must be used every week for a while until all mites are dead (pets that have been in direct contact with yours must sometimes be treated also, since mite infections can be asymptomatic). The lesions take much longer to heal than it takes to kill the mites, since you're seeing an allergic reaction plus local bacterial infection (use Neosporin ointment after the first week). Ivermectin paste from horse and agricultural (farmer's) stores can be diluted 200 to 1 in mineral oil and used freely on the skin in cats, and probably most dogs (collies and other herding dogs are theoretically more sensitive to ivermectin if they have the wrong genetics-- you can read about that under ivermectin). Oral forms of ivermectin work, but should be left to your vet. Nix and Lyclear permethrin creams intended for human head-lice use, can also be used on mite-mange in dogs (but do NOT ever use them on cats, as they are toxic to cats). SBHarris 00:39, 12 November 2011 (UTC)

Animals with mange in current news[edit]

This looks to me like a coyote with severe sarcoptic mange: [1] Sort of like the one I uploaded today. [[2]] Does anyone want to tackle the so-called chupacabra silliness? It may have a place in this article.Bugguyak 18:08, 2 September 2007 (UTC)

Link added to the wikipedia pages with relevant info. 68.186.246.165 (talk) 06:17, 13 April 2009 (UTC)

I agree, it would be a public service to mention that coyotes and racoons are getting mange and being called chupacabra. Also, is there any particular reason that this is happening more now? Why are there more animals with such severe mange in North America?86.129.175.167 (talk) 09:22, 5 April 2014 (UTC)

Mange-affected species[edit]

The article says that several different "species" can get mange, but doesn't say which ones. How many kinds of mammals get mange; does it affect only a few families, or are the majority of mammals susceptible to it? Can other kinds of animals get mange, or is it restricted to mammals? 75.210.190.247 (talk) 07:42, 10 June 2008 (UTC)

I don't see any citation about turtles getting mange or losing their shells.


Mange-affected species[edit]

The article says that several different "species" can get mange, but doesn't say which ones. How many kinds of mammals get mange; does it affect only a few families, or are the majority of mammals susceptible to it? Can other kinds of animals get mange, or is it restricted to mammals? 75.210.190.247 (talk) 07:42, 10 June 2008 (UTC)

I don't see any citation about turtles getting mange or losing their shells.
Turtles do get mange (mite infection) and it causes hemorrhages and blisters on shells [3] Other reptiles can also get mite infections, as can insects and birds. Not all these are referred to as "mange" but they are the same infection. Even plants can be infected with mites. Mites are everywhere (of course, many different specialized species), and they also live freely as non-parasites in the wild. Don't confuse spiderlike mites (which are not insects) with lice, which are insects (six legs) with a much more limited range, needing birds or mammals with hair (except bats) and not able to live anywhere else.SBHarris 18:23, 12 November 2011 (UTC)

Sulfurated lime[edit]

I just added linking brackets in the Treatment paragraph to the phrase, Sulfurated lime. The page for that does not mention use of this preparation for mange. Perhaps somebody with veterinary credentials can make the appropriate edit to that page. Karl Hahn (T) (C) 14:37, 13 July 2009 (UTC)

Agreed. A neighborhood stray has mange and is hanging around. I have a bottle of sulferated lime, but do not know what ratio to dilute it. I'm not paying for a Vet, so it's either this or nothing. A short statement of a typical dosage/dilution and application method would be useful.Jonny Quick (talk) 13:38, 30 October 2011 (UTC)

The page does mention the dilution now: Lime sulfur diluted 1:16 or 1:32. Perhaps err on the high side. More than one application is probably needed. Typically scabies need weeks to months for the lesions to clear up, mostly because it takes that long for the allergy and secondary infections to subside. After a few treatments, topical application of Neosporin to help kill the secondary infections may help a lot. SBHarris 00:02, 12 November 2011 (UTC)

Commonly known as a Chupacapbra???[edit]

The picture of the coyote with mange has a caption saying, "...Commonly known as a chupacabra". That must be a joke. im removing it. Skiendog (talk) 04:55, 4 September 2009 (UTC)