Talk:Mantra

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Priority * -- 21:59, 2 June 2014 (UTC)
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pronunciation guide[edit]

I was just reading various ones of these and I couldn't find the pronunciation guide to the historical Buddha's mantra. Why not just put in a pronunciation guide or a link and a section on pronunciation.--tumaru 18:27, 8 May 2011 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Tumaru (talkcontribs)

Probably because the historical Buddha doesn't have a mantra - he was against the use of mantras as is evidenced in many Pāli texts. You may be thinking of the Śākyamuṇi mantra? Śākyamuni is a retrospective name for the nirmāṇakāya Buddha, but it would be a mistake to equate historical with nirmāṇakāya. Wikipedia's way of dividing up the world means that pronouncing Sanskrit occurs only on the [Sanskrit] page; or on the [Śākyamuṇi] page. mahaabaala (talk) 20:04, 17 October 2011 (UTC)

"While Hindu tantra eventually came to see the letters as well as the sounds as representatives of the divine, the shift toward writing occurred when Buddhism traveled to China. Although China lacked a unifying, ecclesiastic language like Sanskrit, China achieved its cultural unity through a written language with characters that were flexible in pronunciation but more precise in meaning. The Chinese prized written language much more highly than did the Indian Buddhist missionaries, and the writing of mantras became a spiritual practice in its own right. So that whereas Brahmins had been very strict on correct pronunciation, the Chinese, and indeed other Far-Eastern Buddhists were less concerned with this than correctly writing something down. The practice of writing mantras, and copying texts as a spiritual practice, became very refined in Japan, and the writing in the Siddham script in which the Sanskrit of many Buddhist Sutras were written is only really seen in Japan nowadays. However, written mantra-repetition in Hindu practices, with Sanskrit in any number of scripts, is well-known to many sects in India as well."

Sounds like speculative bullshit to me. Indians are practically obsessed with the forms of letters, and seems to have been from the first. Eg. "Evam" in the Buddhist formula "Evam maya srutam" was written in a pre-Devanagaric Brahmi script as two triangles, one with a corner facing up, one down, symbolizing the union of the male and female, (Source: http://www.scribd.com/doc/19919454/the-concealed-essence-of-the-hevajra-tantra-farrow-menon ) etc etc etc... By the time Devanagari evolved, the shapes had become very holy indeed. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 59.93.247.188 (talk) 16:25, 4 December 2011 (UTC)

opening[edit]

"While Hindu tantra eventually came to see the letters as well as the sounds as representatives of the divine, the shift toward writing occurred when Buddhism traveled to China. Although China lacked a unifying, ecclesiastic language like Sanskrit, China achieved its cultural unity through a written language with characters that were flexible in pronunciation but more precise in meaning. The Chinese prized written language much more highly than did the Indian Buddhist missionaries, and the writing of mantras became a spiritual practice in its own right. So that whereas Brahmins had been very strict on correct pronunciation, the Chinese, and indeed other Far-Eastern Buddhists were less concerned with this than correctly writing something down. The practice of writing mantras, and copying texts as a spiritual practice, became very refined in Japan, and the writing in the Siddham script in which the Sanskrit of many Buddhist Sutras were written is only really seen in Japan nowadays. However, written mantra-repetition in Hindu practices, with Sanskrit in any number of scripts, is well-known to many sects in India as well."

Sounds like speculative bullshit to me. Indians are practically obsessed with the forms of letters, and seems to have been from the first. Eg. "Evam" in the Buddhist formula "Evam maya srutam" was written in a pre-Devanagaric Brahmi script as two triangles, one with a corner facing up, one down, symbolizing the union of the male and female, (or so it was interpreted by Vajrayana mystics; source: http://www.scribd.com/doc/19919454/the-concealed-essence-of-the-hevajra-tantra-farrow-menon ) etc etc etc... By the time Devanagari evolved, the shapes had become very holy indeed. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 59.93.247.188 (talk) 16:27, 4 December 2011 (UTC)

sprituality[edit]

it helps lead a peaceful life — Preceding unsigned comment added by 59.95.131.49 (talk) 08:19, 18 April 2012 (UTC)

need for clearer writing and more accurate info[edit]

This article seems pretty scattered and inconsistent. It is also not totally accurate. For example, many Mahayana schools of Buddhism use mantra without the requirement that there be any kind of initiation, including Zen schools. These include mantras associated with specific bodhisattvas, such as Avalokiteshvara and Jizo, and mantras which are associated with nirvana and emptiness such as the one that closes the Prajnaparamita Heart Sutra. Did I miss it or does this article not even mention Amita Buddha and the whole Pure Land school who makes a big deal out of their mantra? Also Nichiren Buddhism. This makes clear the claim that Sikhs are unique in teaching mantra to people without initiation is false. In addition, I'd like to see a comparison between mantra and gatha in Buddhism, and between mantra and other forms of repetition such as the Jesus prayer or Sufi Zikr. It would also be good to note the popular english usage of the term mantra to refer to often repeated slogans. Hope to do more than complain at some point, but thought these comments might be a small contribution I could do now. Thanks hard working and curious peoples! 2602:306:3BA3:5750:280F:1F00:B24F:2842 (talk) 03:01, 21 January 2014 (UTC)

move note to body text[edit]

Towards the end of the Hinduism section there is a simple sentence that declares that there are other important Hindu mantras. This line has a citation that links to a paragraph-long footnote that contains so much useful info that I think it should be moved up to the body text. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.212.212.83 (talk) 00:06, 18 February 2014 (UTC)