Talk:Marc Andreessen

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Reference 13 is dead[edit]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwbkdENhcIk&list=PL766BB6D876F3FFE8 ^Could be a reasonable replacement. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.190.238.68 (talk) 02:34, 1 July 2013 (UTC)


Cedar Falls Connection?[edit]

Why is Marc Andreessen listed as a "notable native" of Cedar Falls? There is nothing in the article that demonstrates a link.

Tsaman 05:33, 12 November 2006 (UTC)

Andreessen bashing[edit]

Interesting link : http://it.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=05/07/14/1343256&from=rss

Interesting comment :

Yeah, this Fortune article is definitely revisionist history, drawn up by some of the people that capitalized on a lot of hard work by others. I know, I was there. I spent a LOT of time in late '91 and most of 1992 corresponding with Robert Cailliau, who was responsible for much of the work on the CERN server/browser combo that predated anything done at NCSA. We at Univ. of Texas were interested in getting scientific papers on-line and had found Gopher to be a train wreck when it came to managing scientific notations, footnotes, and bibliographic references. The guys at CERN had solved the problem for text with the work Tim Berners-Lee had done with HTML and the networking code others at CERN had created for HTTP.
I originally contacted Robert and TB-L about writing a browser for the Mac. They said they'd rather see a server, which is how MacHTTP was born. Once the Mac server was running, I started working with Aleks Totic at NCSA to get the early versions of Mosaic on the Mac to work with the same server. Another prominent figure at NCSA at the time was Tom Redman, who if I recall correctly, was leading the Mosaic effort. At the time, Andressen was just another programmer on the Mosaic effort who had some glory because he hacked up the first working image tag in HTML. Until that time, everything had been text and hyperlinks
Long story short, everyone knew that Andressen snuck out of town with the Mosaic source code, and a few weeks later lured several of the developers like Aleks to go with him. There was a lot of ill-will engendered by that move and it wasn't all sweetness and light as the Fortune article would have you believe.
I remember speaking to the NCSA team (and then the SpyGlass team) many times afterwards, and no one ever really got over the fact that a junior programmer walked out the door with the IP created by dozens of other people and got filthy rich out of it while many of the people who built the original World Wide Web labored on in obscurity. At the time, the Internet culture wasn't about getting rich. It was about creating cool technology and sharing it with others, and almost all of the innovative stuff was still coming out of academia.
If anything, Netscape was the prototypical example of how to swipe someone elses' good ideas, rebrand them, and get rich. That was the company's real legacy to the Internet and the subsequent DotCom lunacy.
Imposter Boy, by Alan Deutschman, Gentleman's Quarterly, January 1997
The media and Wall Street believed Marc Andreessen was "the next Bill Gates" -- the singular genius behind the big high-tech breakthrough of the '90s. But his tale really was too good to be true.

Regarding the above comment culled from Slashdot. According to the Slashdot log, it was written by Chuck Shotton. Here's what Newsweek had to say about Chuck Shotton in their 12/25/95 article "The Net 50: 50 People Who Matter Most on the Internet":

 Chuck Shotton MAC PROGRAMMER
 Shotton is the Macintosh version of Marc Andreessen, without the personal fortune. He 
 makes an Internet browser for the Mac and writes Macintosh Web server software, 
 making him a hero in the Mac community.

So, I'm sure that his opinions on Marc are very objective. (I'm being sarcastic here, in case you can't tell.) Slashdot allows anyone with a keyboard & an opinion to pipe up, and shouldn't be used as a source of trusted information. [The foregoing comment was unsigned and undated. It was edited to indent the quotation. This is the end of that comment.]

Another poster responded to that comment:
You have no clue what you are talking about (Score:2)
by montulli (658308) on Thursday July 14 2005, @10:32PM (#13069422) Homepage
I'm not a huge fan of Marc, having worked with him for four years, but I do know he made attremendous contribution to Mosaic. So much so that I doubt that it would have ever existed had he chosen not to work on it. He and Bina were the only significant contributors at NCSA to Mosaic before it became "popular" and the management at NCSA decided it had been their idea all along.
If you still think that Netscape "walked away with others ideas", just look at who made up the founding team. Virtually every Mosaic contributer, Marc A, Eric Bina, Aleks Totic, Jon Mittlehouser and Mike McCool who wrote the NCSA httpd and invented CGI, Ari Lutonen from CERN and myself who wrote Lynx. We also extended invitations to other significant members of the Web community, including Tim Berners-Lee, to join us when we started. Together the founding team had more programing hours invested in the Web than everyone else combined, by a very large margin.
Judging by the name and the content, the author was Lou Montulli. From his WP article:
He was also responsible for several browser innovations, such as HTTP cookies, the blink tag, server push and client pull, HTTP proxying, and encouraging the implementation of animated GIFs into the browser. While at Netscape, he also was a founding member of the HTML working group at the W3C and was a contributing author of the HTML 3.2 specification. He is one of only five (or six) inductees in the World Wide Web Hall of Fame announced at the first international conference on the World Wide Web in 1994.
So I think he may know what he is talking about better than Chuck Shotton. Enon (talk) 04:51, 28 May 2012 (UTC)

Ning[edit]

It looks from http://www.boingboing.net/2005/10/04/ning_roll_your_own_f.html that Ning is no longer just a "social/tagging site", but I'm not sure what to call it for an edit... -- Melissa Della 09:50, 4 October 2005 (UTC)

That mess on the bottom of the page[edit]

I don't really do much but fix small spelling errors on wikipedia, and don't really want to fuss around with this page at the moment, but all that stuff at the bottom of the page should be deleted... I'm not sure what needs to stay (for the appearance of the page) or not, so I'm afraid to touch it.

Date of birth[edit]

The article lists Marc's birthday as July 9, 1971. However on the web there are also several pages which list April 26, 1971 as his date of birth. Which one is right? --Arun 17:38, 26 April 2007 (UTC)

Yes, when? For instance, both http://www.brainyhistory.com/events/1971/april_26_1971_393792.html and http://www.nndb.com/people/442/000022376/ tell on April 26, 1971 Pcworld 12:24, 19 October 2007 (UTC)

There are some websites that even list his date of birth as occurring in 1972, but none with a birthdate in January. It would be nice if someone could clear this up.

Surname pronunciation[edit]

For an authoritative source on the pronunciation of Andreessen, see his interview with Charlie Rose, at 20:00. — Walloon (talk) 03:56, 24 November 2008 (UTC)

He pronounces it ann-DREES-sen himself at the end of his interview with Charlie Rose on February 19, 2009. You can watch/listen here: http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/10093

Mismatch in the DOB[edit]

In the same article, his DOB is marked as 01-Jan-1971 in the begginning of the article and -09-July-1971 right below the picture...Which one is correct? — User:Krishna Mohan Reddy —Preceding unsigned comment added by 192.76.80.75 (talk) 15:13, 19 February 2009 (UTC) His DOB is quoted on Wolfram Alpha as 26-Apr-1971. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.171.60.153 (talk) 08:21, 2 November 2010 (UTC)

Skype Acquisition[edit]

Nothing is mentioned about the recent Skype buyout. slashdot.org computerworld.com Kharri1073 (talk) 16:00, 1 September 2009 (UTC)

I just added it, why didn't you?--87.162.32.242 (talk) 01:17, 2 September 2009 (UTC)