Talk:Margaret the Virgin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Biography (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Biography, a collaborative effort to create, develop and organize Wikipedia's articles about people. All interested editors are invited to join the project and contribute to the discussion. For instructions on how to use this banner, please refer to the documentation.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 
WikiProject Syria (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Syria, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Syria on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Saints (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Saints, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Saints and other individuals commemorated in Christian liturgical calendars on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

Needs to be merged into article.[edit]

Saint Margarita, virgin and martyr, is celebrated by the Church of Rome on July 20, but her feast formerly fell on the 13th, and her story is almost identical, even in the proper names, with that of the Greek St. Marina (July 17). She was of Antioch (in the Greek story, Antioch of Pisidia), daughter of a priest Aedesius. She lived in the country with a foster mother, scorned by her father for her Christian faith, and keeping sheep. Olybrius the "praeses Orientis" sees her, and offers her his hand as the price of renunciation of Christianity. Her refusal leads to her being cruelly tortured, and after various miraculous incidents, in which a heavenly dove plays a prominent part, she is put to death.

Women prayed to St. Margarita for easy deliverance. It has been shown by H. Usener (Legenden der heiligen Pelagia, Bonn, 1879) that this legend belongs to a group of various narratives which all have their root in a transition of the Semitic Aphrodite into a Christian penitent or saint. Of these legends that of St. Pelagi is perhaps the most important. Marina is a translation of Pelagia, and both are epithets of Aphrodite as she was worshipped on the coasts of the Levant. Pelagia in the legend has Margarita as her second name. The association of the marine goddess with the pearl is obvious, and the images of Aphrodite were decked with these jewels.


From the 9th edition (1883) of an unnamed encyclopedia.

See also: Saint Margaret the Virgin

Olybrius[edit]

The article links to Olybrius, who was Emperor for 3 months before dying in 472. Whereas, it also says, Margaret died in 304. Both can't be "right"; we should get the legend straight. Johnbod 16:11, 9 June 2007 (UTC)

The python stuff[edit]

I recommend deleting it. Pythons make sure their prey is dead before they start swallowing. That's what all the strangling is for. David Marjanović (talk) 00:59, 22 November 2007 (UTC)

Maybe you're right. I enjoyed it as a splendid rearguard action, but ... Johnbod (talk) 01:06, 22 November 2007 (UTC)

Preserved for posterity: "If Margaret has been a historical person, an explanation for the dragon could be a rock python (Python sebae), which can grow to length of up to 6 m (20 ft). It was known to Romans, and often seen in circuses. Rock pythons are known to have attacked and even swallowed humans, and if Margaret had been of smallish stature, the snake could well have devoured her and later vomited."

It's the "could well" I like! Johnbod (talk) 01:08, 22 November 2007 (UTC)

The Word Cult[edit]

I do believe using the word cult to describe groups that took to Saint Margaret of Antioch is unnecessary. The word cult carries negative connotations that this article does not need. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Jewellertman (talkcontribs) 08:12, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

The word cult has a specific meaning in religious studies that is different than it's contemporary meaning. Its usage is correct here. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Leprendun (talkcontribs) 13:57, 10 September 2009 (UTC)


I agree, in fact, none of the Saints were apart of any cult. Cult people are cultists and Saints are saints. Some people hate the saints so much that they will purposely call them everything else but a Saint. :( —Preceding unsigned comment added by DanaelC (talkcontribs) 14:37, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Leprendun is quite correct, as you will see from the article Cult (religious practice). Ian Spackman (talk) 19:36, 30 October 2009 (UTC)