Talk:Marina Abramović

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[Untitled][edit]

Solo performances in the early 1970's "Rhythms"

Shout until she was completely hoarse.

Dance until she collapsed.

Buffeted by a wind machine until she passed out.

Rhythm 5 (1974)

She lay down in the center of a fire until she passed out from lack of oxygen and had to be rescued.

Rhythm 0 (1974 )

Stood in the space of the Studio Mona Gallery in Naples next to a table holding 72 objects. Tools, scissors, a loaded gun.

Performance had to stop because after the visitors had cut off all her clothing, she was also required to place the barrel of the gun into her open mouth.

Visitors were invited to use them and her as they saw fit.

Seven Easy Pieces[edit]

I've begun editing the article, adding new text and information, and, most importantly, providing references and citations throughout. It seems clear to me that the Ayers review from Total Theatre magazine that comprises almost all of the final section will have to be entirely removed, and the information compressed and paraphrased.--Galliaz 01:54, 14 March 2006 (UTC)

I totally excised the text of Ayer's Total Theatre review (it had been jammed into the entry en toto.) There are clear copyright issues with it being present in the entry, and, stylistically, it was a nightmare. I plan to add a brief section on the critical response to the recent Guggenheim performances soon.

I went ahead and gave the Seven Easy Pieces their own page, because I think it's time that a number of important performances (such as that one, for instance) get their own articles. I'll be getting to the originals of the ones she performed in a bit. --AlbertHerring 22:57, 8 October 2006 (UTC)

Teaching practice[edit]

Mention should be made of Abramovic's teaching practice. She has produced a book about it called Student Body. Unfortuntely I do not have access to a copy, but I was once fortunate enough to see a showcase of her students' work from when she was teaching at HBK Braunschweig. The students' clarity of vision was quite remarkable, way beyond what you would typically expect at undergraduate level. Ireneshusband 11:02, 5 November 2006 (UTC)

Citation for birth certificate comment?[edit]

"(born 30 November 1946,

In 1976, after moving to Amsterdam, Abramović met the West German performance artist Uwe Laysiepen, who went by the single name Ulay. They had both been born on the same day, though in completely different regimes: her birth certificate was marked by a five-rayed star, while his had a swastika."

Is there a source for that seems a bit odd since by the end of 1946 denazification should have been very intense. Or is it supposed to be metaphorical mispresented as fact.

Yeah, I get your point, the swastika certainly wouldn't have been on a document issued in 1946. I'm working to track down that source (which I don't own). However, here's info on the actual date from an interview in Artist Body (Charta, 1998): MA: So I met Ulay and it was the day I was born, my birthday, and his birthday. Interviewer: November 30? MA: November 30... —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Galliaz (talkcontribs) 15:35, 15 February 2007 (UTC).
Ulay was born on the same day, but in 1943, not 1946, so his birth certificate may well have spotted a swastika. -- megA (talk) 16:31, 31 October 2011 (UTC)

How long has she been givin the same lecture?[edit]

"She is currently at Bard College in Upstate New York giving a lecture."

Is the lecture still going on?
I bet she is lecturing about herself? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.93.58.126 (talk) 21:27, 1 March 2014 (UTC)

English is not my first language so i dare not to edit this, but when i read this sentence, it sounds like she is, at this very moment, still holding the same lecture. Is she a lecturer there, does she reside in upstate NY? shouldnt this be more defined? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Pailhead (talkcontribs) 17:32, 19 June 2008 (UTC)

Both of her parents were of Montenegrin nationality, and she considers herself Montenegrin, as she mentioned in recent intereview for TV of Montenegro, but it's not mentioned anywhere in the text???

Find references. Vanjagenije (talk) 09:33, 29 April 2010 (UTC)


There is no clear evidence about her nationality. If she said that she is Montenegrin (but no is no reference yet), it most of cases it is geografical reference only. Truth is that she never explicit said about her nationality, so it is not objective to refer to her as Montenegrin, nor Serb. Surname Abramović is alomost never Serbian or Montenigran, but Jewish. There is also trend on english wikipeda in recent years of proclaiming more and more people for Montenigrins, without any clear evidence, for political reasons, as a part of Montenegrin "national awake", and I am affraid this is part of it. Only objective statement is that her nationality is unknown, or that she is American of unknown (Jewish, Montenegrin or Serbian descents). Sorry for bad english. Cheers! 77.105.53.18 (talk) 12:09, 1 July 2011 (UTC)

New external link[edit]

I have added a link to a video of the artist talking about her performance practice throughout her career. It is an interesting look into her artistic process. T.Broch (talk) 14:14, 12 August 2011 (UTC)

Table in "the Artist is Present"[edit]

Does anyone know at which point the table (which can be seen in the picture taken in March) was removed? Because when I was at the MoMA on May 12, 2010, there was no table. (I dimly remembered somewhere that Ms Abramovic had the table removed at some point, but I don't remember when that was. She also wore a white gown when I was there...) -- megA (talk) 16:20, 31 October 2011 (UTC)

It's removed two months upon opening, by Marina's request. She talks about it in "The Artist Is Present", movie about her and her show at MoMA. --109.106.254.100 (talk) 04:23, 29 October 2012 (UTC)

Marina's nationality[edit]

http://www.dijasporacg.me/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1969:marina-abramovi-u-crnoj-gori&catid=16:vijesti-iz-dijaspore&Itemid=162 Marina is a self-declared Montenegrin, has a Montenegrin passport and has represented Montenegro at the last Biennale in Venice. It seems that only the Croatian Wikipedia respects that fact. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 89.188.38.226 (talk) 13:40, 10 July 2012 (UTC)

Yeah, and just all other wikipedias say different (and with more valid references), Croatian must be right... --109.121.6.206 (talk) 23:26, 11 September 2012 (UTC)

Croatian wikipedia has allready problems with writing a lot of offensive and incorrect contents. So If I where you , I would rather find information in some neutral wikipedia .

Nationality disputed[edit]

Two days ago in Serbian TV, Marina clearly identify herself as a Serbian, and speaks on clear Serbian, and not not Montenegrin language. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjLFSphK_50&t=12m26s More references coming as soon as published. For now there is no strong evidence that her nationality is strictly, or at all Montenegrin. So there is any right to change in text her name no "Montenegrin Cyrillic" and putting in many places her nationality to Montenegrin, using just one non-clear reference, that can be interpenetrated in many ways. I already said that this is almost wiki vandalism, made by ultra-right Montenegrin users, with no interest in objectivity, but only in ultra-nationalism. I insist on reverse back in article her nationality to "Serbian-American", as it was, or leaving just "American" as she really is, and she clearly is, without any speculations. --109.121.31.214 (talk) 21:51, 8 October 2012 (UTC)

First of all, she was born in Yugoslavia, and her parents were partisans (therefore communists, and that's what she says in her film The Artist is Present), I doubt she was ever raised to feel as being Serbian or Montenegrin since communist are anti-nationalists. Second, she doesn't live in Serbia nor Montenegro, she lives in New York, so most correct would probably be to say that she is an American, and if she moved there from Yugoslavia, then Yugoslav-American (and why the hell not?). But as far as I am concerned, she is a citizen of the World, end of story. We should probably give her and everybody else a break about her nationality anyways --109.106.254.100 (talk) 04:13, 29 October 2012 (UTC)

http://www.pobjeda.me/2012/10/01/marina-abramovic-pripadam-crnoj-gori/ http://www.portalanalitika.me/drustvo/vijesti/75543-marina-abramovi-zaplakala-primajui-trinaestojulsku-nagradu.html http://www.vesti-online.com/Scena/Kultura/259402/Marina-Abramovic-Srbima-fali-ljudskosti How many other sources proving that she's Montenegrin do you need? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Rasho992 (talkcontribs) 20:55, 10 December 2012 (UTC)

Per neutral, non-Montenegrin sources, she is not Montenegrin. --WhiteWriterspeaks 14:34, 22 June 2013 (UTC)

The Artist is Present[edit]

Shouldn't there be a page specifically for the documentary "The Artist is Present"? --Matt723star (talk) 21:43, 30 March 2013 (UTC)

Pop culture references[edit]

Shouldn't there be a section for pop culture references that could feature stuff like this? Kim Stanley Robinson's science fiction novel 2312 mentions a style of performance art pieces known as "abramovics". Normosphere (talk) 12:02, 16 June 2014 (UTC)