Talk:Mars

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Featured article Mars is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so.
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edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Mars:

Please update to reflect the success of India lower down the article in the Exploration section as the one of the countries to have sent a mission and also the first Asian country and the first to achieve orbit on first mission - you have identified the satellite in the initial paragraphs but not in the exploration body where the additional detail might best be inserted.

Please update highest temperature on Mars. While the conservative figures quoted are from Nasa, there are other Nasa sites especialy rover site which quotes much higher numbers. Would somebody please further research and update. A quote from nasa rover source at : http://marsrover.nasa.gov/spotlight/20070612.html

Change min-max surface temperature. Min is -153 °C and the max is 20 °C according to NASA. Source: http://quest.nasa.gov/aero/planetary/mars.html

212.81.21.19 (talk) 01:41, 12 January 2009 (UTC)


Any chance that Fahrenheit temps could also be included on right hand chart??

Incorrect conversion of summer max temps in S. Hemisphere : 30C <--> 54F which is correct?

Both are correct. This is a temperature DIFFERENCE, not an absolute temperature. Boardhead (talk) 16:25, 30 September 2011 (UTC)


There's not much point in including "mean anomaly" in the chart on the right. This quantity describes the position of Mars around its orbit and changes continuously. It would be rather neat if that entry linked to an ephemeris and kept us updated on the current position of Mars.


"Aluminum" really? Step it up America.


Shouldn't the diameters of Phobos and Deimos be displayed in km (metric units)? They are now displayed as miles (imperial units). VictordeHollander (talk) 13:47, 26 February 2014 (UTC) I also noticed that the diameters of Phobos and Deimos are not in metric units. This is inconsistent with most if not all planetary data found on Wikipedia. I agree that these units should be in Km, as the metric system is internationally preferred, especially in this context.

The 47-year cycle of Mars was observed by the Ancients[edit]

The 47-year cycle of Mars: after 47 years - 22 synodic periods of 780 days each - Mars returns to the same position among the stars and is in the same relationship to the Earth and Sun. The ancient Mesopotamians discovered this cycle. [1]

Second smallest planet?[edit]

Pluto has been officially re-declared a planet. It is now, once again, the 3rd smallest planet. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 206.72.2.204 (talk) 00:36, 28 October 2014 (UTC)

Pluto has not been recategorized. I remember seeing a story about how the audience at some debate voted that they thought Pluto should be a planet again, but there's certainly been nothing remotely approaching an official change. --Patteroast (talk) 08:01, 28 October 2014 (UTC)
In order to recategorize Pluto as a planet, the IAU would either have to figure out what to do about Ceres, Vesta, and the other main-belt asteroids, or arbitrarily categorize Pluto as a planet without a defining rule. Ceres, Vesta, Juno, and Pallas were categorized as planets briefly in the nineteenth century until astronomers realized how many of them there were and decided that they couldn't be planets. Maybe Pluto never should have been categorized as a planet using the criterion of clearing the orbit, but it was found in a quest for a planet that was originally thought to be larger than it turns out to be, and it may have originally not been known to be in resonance with Neptune. Robert McClenon (talk) 16:08, 3 November 2014 (UTC)

Irrelevant Information[edit]

Under the Habitability section there is the phrase "Microorganisms make up 80% of Earth's biomass." This is irrelevant and does not relate to Mars. 24.149.255.225 (talk) 21:47, 30 November 2014 (UTC) Anonymous

Tweaked the paragraph. --NeilN talk to me 00:12, 1 December 2014 (UTC)

NASA-TV/ustream (Friday, 11/07/2014@12pm/et/usa) - C/2013 A1 Flyby of Mars - Telecon.[edit]

NASA-TV/ustream (Friday, November 7, 2014@12pm/et/usa) - experts provide initial science observations of comet C/2013 A1 close flyby of Mars on October 19, 2014 and the Martian atmosphere.[1] - Enjoy! :) Drbogdan (talk) 03:26, 6 November 2014 (UTC)

FOLLOWUP - Space Experts Discuss the Effects on the Martian atmosphere of the Comet C/2013 A1 Flyby of Mars on October 19, 2014[2] - Archived Discussion => Audio (with visuals; 60:21) - Enjoy! :) Drbogdan (talk) 19:45, 7 November 2014 (UTC)
References
  1. ^ Dyches, Preston; Webster, Guy; Brown, Dwayne; Jones, Nancy Neal; Zubritsky, Elizabeth (November 5, 2014). "NASA Telecon to Discuss Mars Comet Flyby Science". NASA. Retrieved November 5, 2014. 
  2. ^ Chang, Kenneth (November 7, 2014). "Opportunity, Curiosity, but No View of Mars Sky Show". New York Times. Retrieved November 7, 2014. 

Semi-protected edit request on 3 December 2014[edit]

This is the section that I discovered:

Surface geology[edit]

Main article: Geology of Mars

Mars is a terrestrial planet that consists of minerals containing silicon and oxygen, metals, and other elements that typically make up rock. The surface of Mars is primarily composed of tholeiitic basalt,[1] although parts are more silica-rich than typical basalt and may be similar to andesitic rocks on Earth or silica glass. Regions of low albedo show concentrations of plagioclase feldspar, with northern low albedo regions displaying higher than normal concentrations of sheet silicates and high-silicon glass. Parts of the southern highlands include detectable amounts of high-calcium pyroxenes. Localized concentrations of hematite and olivine have also been found.[2] Much of the surface is deeply covered by finely grained iron(III) oxide dust.[3][4]


The reference to the discovery of olivine should be my Science paper:

[5] Thoefen (talk) 07:00, 3 December 2014 (UTC)

Pictogram voting question.svg Question: Why Your science papaer? It is already cited to a reliable source. May I know what's wrong with that source? Should I see this edit-request as an attempt to spam /your related/ links on Wikipedia? Are you aware of the fact that Wikipedia is not a soapbox or means of promotion? Thanks! Anupmehra -Let's talk! 08:07, 3 December 2014 (UTC)
References
  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference science324_5928_736 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ Cite error: The named reference jgr107_E6 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference sci300a was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ Cite error: The named reference sci300b was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  5. ^ Hoefen, T.M., et al. 2003. Discovery of Olivine in the Nili Fossae Region of Mars. Science 302, 627-630. "http://www.sciencemag.org/content/302/5645/627"

Semi-protected edit request on 3 December 2014[edit]

[1] Thoefen (talk) 07:02, 3 December 2014 (UTC)

References
  1. ^ Hoefen, T.M., et al. 2003. Discovery of Olivine in the Nili Fossae Region of Mars. Science 302, 627-630. "http://www.sciencemag.org/content/302/5645/627"
By the looks of your username, it appears you wish to cite yourself. Stickee (talk) 08:00, 3 December 2014 (UTC)

Closest approaches - correction request[edit]

Under 7. Views - Closest approaches is says:

"The last Mars opposition occurred on April 8, 2014 at a distance of about 180 million km." ref[194]

According to reference [194] the distance is 0.621 AU which equals about 93 million km not 180.

Pls. correct. to "93 million Km." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 95.180.215.122 (talk) 13:13, 6 December 2014 (UTC)

The source shows 0.621 AU (92,900,000 km; 57,700,000 mi). Yes check.svg Done

Ouch, one of our Orbital dynamics Jedi stepped into that one on 14 June 2014. -- Kheider (talk) 17:12, 24 January 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 18 January 2015[edit]

I wanted to request to make a slight change in tone regarding how frequently pressure and temperature conditions allow for liquid water on Mars.

The landers since viking routinely (meaning on a daily basis) measure pressures above 800 Pascal, and temperatures above the freezing point of water. The article as written implies that this only happens rarely.

The triple point of water is at a pressure of about 611 Pascals. Over a 100 sol period in 2008, the Phoenix lander recorded an average pressure of about 857 Pa. In 1976, the Viking lander recorded pressures over 700 Pa. The Curiosity probe which landed in 2012 often measures pressures as high as 1000 Pa with temperatures above 0C at the same time.

In fact, in most places where probes have landed, the pressure is consistently above the triple point. For example, Phoenix typically measures pressure above 800 Pa, and the most recent rover, Curiosity (MSL) routinely measures pressures between 700 and 1000 Pa. Thus, liquid water is possible whenever the temperature crosses 0 Celcius, which occurs on a daily basis during Spring and Summer days.

Now, I know this type of edit must be done carefully to avoid creating a tone that implies that liquid water is abundant.

For example the section on hydrology opens with:

"Liquid water cannot exist on the surface of Mars due to low atmospheric pressure, which is about 100 times thinner than Earth's,[61] except at the lowest elevations for short periods."

Perhaps a better way to start this section might be:

"Liquid water can exist on the surface of Mars. The triple point of water is 611 Pa, and the pressure on Mars is frequently above this, especially at lower elevations. However, Mars is very dry, so even when pressure and temperatures allow for liquid water, it is rarely present..."

This is a subtle point that I think should be addressed...

The lander data from JPL...[1] confirms that liquid water can occur frequently.


TomEdBrennan (talk) 18:34, 18 January 2015 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please establish a consensus for this alteration before using the {{edit semi-protected}} template.  B E C K Y S A Y L E 17:16, 19 January 2015 (UTC)

Here are several recent published articles that claim that liquid water occurs on Mars. Mostly based on orbital photography of frequent changes in water-flow gullies:

[2]

Cite error: A <ref> tag is missing the closing </ref> (see the help page).

[3]

[4]

Cite error: A <ref> tag is missing the closing </ref> (see the help page).

[5]

[6]

[7]

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please establish a consensus for this alteration before using the {{edit semi-protected}} template. That's not an on-wiki discussion that has achieved a consensus to implement your requested changes. Please do what we've asked instead. :) — {{U|Technical 13}} (etc) 17:38, 24 January 2015 (UTC)
    @inproceedings{mcewen2012recurring,
      title={Recurring Slope Lineae: Evidence for Present-Day Flowing Water on Mars?},
      author={McEwen, A and Byrne, S and Dundas, C and Mattson, S and Murchie, S and Ojha, L and Schaefer, E and Thomas, N and Wray, J},
      booktitle={European Planetary Science Congress 2012},
      volume={1},
      pages={276},
      year={2012}
    }
    
    

    </body></html>

    • ^ <html><head></head><body>
    @article{hecht2002metastability,
      title={Metastability of liquid water on Mars},
      author={Hecht, Michael H},
      journal={Icarus},
      volume={156},
      number={2},
      pages={373--386},
      year={2002},
      publisher={Elsevier}
    }
    
    

    </body></html>

    • ^ <html><head></head><body>
    @article{haberle2001possibility,
      title={On the possibility of liquid water on present-day Mars},
      author={Haberle, Robert M and McKay, Christopher P and Schaeffer, James and Cabrol, Nathalie A and Grin, Edmon A and Zent, Aaron P and Quinn, Richard},
      journal={Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets (1991--2012)},
      volume={106},
      number={E10},
      pages={23317--23326},
      year={2001},
      publisher={Wiley Online Library}
    }
    
    

    </body></html>

    • ^ <html><head></head><body>
    @article{mcewen2007closer,
      title={A closer look at water-related geologic activity on Mars},
      author={McEwen, AS and Hansen, CJ and Delamere, WA and Eliason, EM and Herkenhoff, KE and Keszthelyi, L and Gulick, VC and Kirk, RL and Mellon, MT and Grant, JA and others},
      journal={Science},
      volume={317},
      number={5845},
      pages={1706--1709},
      year={2007},
      publisher={American Association for the Advancement of Science}
    }
    
    

    </body></html>

    • ^ <html><head></head><body>
    @article{mellon2001recent,
      title={Recent gullies on Mars and the source of liquid water},
      author={Mellon, Michael T and Phillips, Roger J},
      journal={Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets (1991--2012)},
      volume={106},
      number={E10},
      pages={23165--23179},
      year={2001},
      publisher={Wiley Online Library}
    }
    
    

    </body></html>

    • ^ <html><head></head><body>
    @article{dickson2015recent,
      title={Recent climate cycles on Mars: Stratigraphic relationships between multiple generations of gullies and the latitude dependent mantle},
      author={Dickson, James L and Head, James W and Goudge, Timothy A and Barbieri, Lindsay},
      journal={Icarus},
      year={2015},
      publisher={Elsevier}
    }
    
    

    </body></html>