Talk:Marshall Islands

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Leprosy[edit]

The paragraph:

 Medical specialists say the Marshall Islands have the most cases of leprosy in the world.[2]

at the end of the history section seems very misplaced. Should it be moved to the demographics section, moved to a new section on the health of the inhabitants, or just simply deleted?

Pstemari (talk) 02:14, 11 February 2008 (UTC)

The source referenced has been removed, and the claim is demonstratively false. Leprosy prevalence is 2.73 per thousand of population in 2004 (newest data I found)[1] Brazil on the other hand had 46 cases per thousand of population in 2004 [2] (note the difference in unit given for prevalence in WHO stats and adjust accordingly.)
Jvbishop (talk) 12:32, 11 February 2008 (UTC)

Correcting myself (sorry it was early and I did my math backwards) the Marshall Islands has a prevalence of Leprosy of 27.3 per 10,000 of population and Brazil has a prevalence of 4.6 per 10,000. Reinserting info into the article but in demographics section.
Jvbishop (talk) 15:38, 11 February 2008 (UTC)

district division[edit]

I can't find any evidence of this 33 district division from the CIA World Factbook, other than from the CIA. It's especially peculiar since several of this islands are uninhabited.

What I can find is a 24 district division, on the Marshall Islands US embassy website:

http://www.rmiembassyus.org/government/overview.html

So I'll update to match that. -- Walt Pohl 17:00, 21 Mar 2004 (UTC)

Perhaps there was a reorg between the date of the CIA data and the present web page? Or the web page simplifies by omitting uninhabited districts, since there are no residents there needing services. :-) Stan 21:31, 21 Mar 2004 (UTC)

Here's the CIA's list for reference:

Walt Pohl 17:02, 21 Mar 2004 (UTC)


I think the link "ebon" in languages is wrong ?

Tuna Loining Plant[edit]

According to this article, the plant closed in 2005. I clicked on "Main article: Economy of the Marshall Islands" and it sounds as if it's still open. Which is it?

--

I think it is still closed, but (Chinese?) investors are looking at re-opening it. [Feb. 23, 07] It has been discussed on: http://www.yokwe.net/

The sentence "The plant was closed in 2005, following a failed attempt to convert it from producing tuna loins to tuna steaks, (a fiction developed by individuals in the government interested in taking over the operations) a process that requires only half of the employee base." was confusing. I'm worried that this is a bit editorial. Can anyone clean this up? SkipSmith (talk) 11:23, 18 March 2008 (UTC)

The Compact of Free Association and the matter of independence and sovereignity[edit]

I have read the Compact of Free Association and I don't think it gave independence or sovereignity to the RMI. The text of the whole Compact does not refer to the US giving either or to the RMI. In fact, the Compact refers to certain adminsitrative and financial matters between the US and the RMI and does never touch on the matter of independence at all.

The Compact treats the RMI as a sovereign and independent state from the beginning and was negotiated on the basis that the Compact would follow the Constitutional process in both the US and the RMI. The Compact is an international treaty and as such, it required at least two states to become parties to it. This is clearly reflected in the preamble of the Compact.

A state is created by some sort of declaration, such as the RMI Constitution of 1979. The Compact simply acknowledged the Constitution and the fact that by then the RMI was already politically independent and sovereign.

While I agree that the Compact was a decisive element in the process of independence of the RMI (recognition by other states is an element of the existence of a state), I think independence had already been granted or achieved.

The process of Independence of the RMI started in 1979 with the Constitution; progressed as in 1986 the Compact became the first International Treaty signed by the RMI, which implied recognition by the US; and culminated with the termination of the territorial Trust by the UN in 1991. Didacvs 19:30, 23 November 2006 (UTC)


As far as the US Postal system is concerned, MH is part of the United States (see http://www.usps.com/ncsc/lookups/usps_abbreviations.html). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.253.111.217 (talk) 16:32, 7 March 2008 (UTC)

Proposed WikiProject[edit]

There is now a proposed WikiProject dealing with the area of Micronesia at Wikipedia:WikiProject Council/Proposals#Micronesia. Any interested parties should add their names there, so we can see if there is enough interest in this project to try to officially start it. Thank you. Badbilltucker 21:20, 17 December 2006 (UTC)

Capital city[edit]

I don't think that you can say that Majuro is the capital of the Marshall Islands. The capital is Uliga in the Delap-Uliga-Darrit-community (also called D-U-D), which lies in the Majuro atoll. I think that we must change from Majuro to Delap-Uliga-Darrit instead. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 81.228.219.87 (talk) 18:50, 14 March 2007 (UTC).

Nuclear tests[edit]

Hello:

The article mentions over 6,000 weapons tests here. Is this acurate?

No, that was vandalism (now fixed). The correct number is 66 (see this link). El_C 20:17, 12 April 2007 (UTC)

Marshallese Scouting[edit]

Can someone render "Be Prepared", the Scout Motto, into Marshallese? Thanks! Chris 04:32, 8 August 2007 (UTC)

Coconut Oil[edit]

6 to 10 nuts for one liter of oil seems optimistic. Another references? DanielCraneSmith (talk) 01:05, 9 June 2008 (UTC)

Marshallese school system[edit]

I found about some Marshallese schools here: http://www.doi.gov/oia/press/2008/04292008.html

Does the government have a school district website? WhisperToMe (talk) 08:06, 7 September 2008 (UTC)

Currency\Coins[edit]

I think it may be interesting to have a section on the situation with their coins, particularly the commemorative coins, as well as unique situation that they use the American dollar as their own, and how their commemorative dollars only have quasi-legal tender status. But if nothing else, shouldn't their commemorative coins be worthy of mention? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.193.79.137 (talk) 13:58, 16 January 2009 (UTC)

Harry the Flying Turttle?![edit]

There are some references to 'Harry the Flying Turtle', using the Marshall Island constitution as its cite. Is this a joke? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Extrakun (talkcontribs) 02:17, 4 March 2009 (UTC)

Mulgrave Islands[edit]

I personally made a search for "Mulgrave Islands" and found no Wikipedia entry. I am not proficient with Wikipedia having never made a contribution or edit, so I am posting my findings so that another party may make the appropriate changes: At one time, apparently during the late 18th and the 19th centuries an alternative name for part of the Marshall Islands was "Mulgrave Islands." This name is derived from a proposed discoverer of the islands, the navigator Lord Mulgrave (1744-92), though who actually was the first to discover the islands seems to be disputed. Many references to the Mulgrave Islands, including precise longitude and latitude and the name of several of the islands is given in the public domain book: "A NARRATIVE OF THE MUTINY, ON BOARD THE SHIP GLOBE, OF NANTUCKET,IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN, JAN. 1824 AND THE JOURNAL OF A RESIDENCE OF TWO YEARS ON THE MULGRAVE ISLANDS..." BY WILLIAM LAY, OF SAYBROOK, CONN. AND CYRUS M. HUSSEY, OF NANTUCKET,NEW-LONDON: PUBLISHED BY WM. LAY, AND C. M. HUSSEY, 1828. (available on Google Books as well as Distributed Proofreaders website, http://www.pgdp.net/c/project.php?id=projectID48114dee8f815&expected_state=proj_post_first_checked_out) Other evidence is found in the public domain book "Chambers's Concise Gazetteer Of The World", by David Patrick (http://chestofbooks.com/travel/reference/World-Gazetteer/Mourna-Mountains-Mullingar.html) which states explicitly that the Mulgrave Islands were a part of the Marshalls and for whom they were named. Thanks!Scibble (talk) 17:04, 9 May 2009 (UTC)

Plagarism[edit]

Much of this article is copied from the CIA world Factbook. I'm not sure what the specific plagirism rules are for wikipedia, but copying a source probably violates them. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.226.243.231 (talk) 03:19, 7 April 2010 (UTC)

My understanding is that, as a publication of the US federal government, the CIA World Factbook is in the public domain, and its text can be used by Wikipedia freely. --Jfruh (talk) 11:20, 7 April 2010 (UTC)

Redundant links[edit]

This article appears to be riddled with redundant links. I have removed some and will work on this page for a bit. Sprinkler21 (talk) 09:53, 12 January 2013 (UTC)Sprinkler21

There is no need for brevity in an online encylopedia. Using "WW II" instead of "World War II" (and the same for the First World War) looks odd and unneccessary, and using the longer form is certainly not "redundant". IgnorantArmies 13:25, 12 January 2013 (UTC)
I disagree. However, since the article was originally written with "World War II" instead of the the shorter, more commonly used "WW II" then the article should stay that way. What I meant by removing redundant links was that I found several instances where there were several "World War II" links in the article. I left the first one and removed the others. Sprinkler21 (talk) 18:29, 12 January 2013 (UTC)Sprinkler21

Lightning strikes on land?[edit]

Anyone who has lived on Kwajalein can attest that lightning does not strike the ground. The article, lightning, and nearly every other article I've found, says just the opposite. For example, sub-tropical Florida is the lightning (strike) capital of the US. However, Hawaii has experienced no lightning deaths in the past decade or so which has led to the myth that lightning does not strike the ground. Maybe Hawaii isn't far enough south? Student7 (talk) 20:59, 20 December 2014 (UTC)