Talk:Martinus Smiglecius

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Untitled[edit]

The move of this article without any discussion was a bad idea. Smiglecius is the name used in English for 350 years. Charles Matthews (talk) 17:10, 2 January 2009 (UTC)

The Latin version indeed seems more popular; but shouldn't a Polish person use a Polish name? --Piotr Konieczny aka Prokonsul Piotrus| talk 17:55, 2 January 2009 (UTC)
That isn't what the policy says. And in fact at the period the use of Latin (humanist) names was very common. For example, we have Caesar Baronius as title, for an Italian called Cesare Bsronio, alive at the same time. Charles Matthews (talk) 19:16, 2 January 2009 (UTC)
Could you cite the policy? In any case, I reverted my move as the latin variant seems to be highly dominant in English literature.--Piotr Konieczny aka Prokonsul Piotrus| talk 19:48, 2 January 2009 (UTC)