Talk:Meanings of minor planet names

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Citation templates[edit]

These two templates facilitate citation references:

Urhixidur 03:07, 3 July 2006 (UTC)

Backups of a few MPCs[edit]

Because the cfa-www.harvard.edu domain is notorious for the unstability of its contents, we've created local backups of some MPCs (Minor Planet Circulars). These two are listed as "sample" MPCs, and were copied because they contain minor planet naming citations.

MPC 24765, 1995 FEB. 15[edit]

(grabbed on April 28, 2006)

Note: (5819) Shinsengumi is actually (5815) Shinsengumi; this is either a typo in the MPC or an actual later renumbering.

M. P. C. 24 765 1995 FEB. 15
(4992) K\'alm\'an = 1982 UX10
Discovered 1982 Oct. 25 by L. V. Zhuravleva at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Named in memory of the Hungarian composer Imre K\'alm\'an (1882-1953).
(5124) Muraoka = 1989 CW
Discovered 1989 Feb. 4 by T. Seki at Geisei.
Named in honor of Kenji Muraoka (b. 1955), a Japanese amateur astronomer who plays an active role in calculating comet orbits.
(5200) Pamal = 1983 CM
Discovered 1983 Feb. 11 by E. Bowell at the Anderson Mesa Station of Lowell Observatory.
Named for Patrick Michael Malotki (b. 1974), friend of the discoverer, on the occasion of his 21st birthday. For many Francophones, the phrase "pas mal" is the highest form of compliment.
(5231) Verne = 1988 JV
Discovered 1988 May 9 by C. S. Shoemaker, E. M. Shoemaker and H. E. Holt at Palomar.
Named for Jules Verne (1828-1905), French novelist and playwright. One of the founding fathers of modern science fiction, he was also the author of numerous works of mainstream adventure fiction. His best-known tales include {\it From the Earth to the Moon} (1865), {\it Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea} (1870) and {\it Around the World in Eighty Days} (1873). The discoverers are great fans of Verne's work, as is M. M. Dworetsky, who suggested the name and prepared the citation.
(5677) Aberdonia = 1987 SQ1
Discovered 1987 Sept. 21 by E. Bowell at the Anderson Mesa Station of the Lowell Observatory.
Named in honor of the University of Aberdeen on the occasion of the quincentenary of its founding, 1995 Feb. 10. The University is noted as having been home to the first chair of medicine in the English-speaking world. The teaching of natural philosophy was established more than 400 years ago, and the earliest record of the teaching of astronomy dates back to 1593. Occupants of chairs of natural philosophy include James Clerk Maxwell and more recently the Nobel laureate George Paget Thomson.
(5819) Shinsengumi = 1989 AH
Discovered 1989 Jan. 3 by T. Seki at Geisei.
Shinsengumi was the name of a 300-member group of samurai that organized the defense of the Tokugawa shogunate and kept order in Kyoto during 1863--1869.
(5823) Oryo = 1989 YH
Discovered 1989 Dec. 20 by T. Seki at Geisei.
Named for Oryo Narasaki (1842-1913), wife of the Japanese revolutionary Ryoma Sakamoto.
(5824) Inagaki = 1989 YM
Discovered 1989 Dec. 24 by T. Seki at Geisei.
Named in honor of Minoru Inagaki (b. 1958), well-known guitarist from Akashi city.
(5884) Dolezal = 6045 P-L
Discovered 1960 Sept. 24 by C. J. van Houten and I. van Houten-Groeneveld on Palomar Schmidt plates taken by T. Gehrels.
Named in memory of Erich Dolezal (1902-1990). He was a talented writer and popularizer of astronomy and space science. He wrote many books and later became Science Advisor of Radio Austria in Vienna, where he gave numerous lectures to schoolchildren and adults. In 1949, he was a co-founder of the Austrian Society for Space Research that was eventually merged into the International Astronautical Federation. Name proposed by the discoverers following a suggestion by H. Haupt.
(5885) Apeldoorn = 3137 T-2
Discovered 1973 Sept. 30 by C. J. van Houten and I. van Houten-Groeneveld on Palomar Schmidt plates taken by T. Gehrels.
Named in honor of Berend Caspar Jan Apeldoorn (b. 1944), Dutch amateur astronomer, on the occasion of his 50th birthday. Since 1961, Ben has specialized in meteors and meteorites, observing meteors both visually and photographically. He has written many articles on astronomy for astronomicalperiodicals and yearbooks, as well as for general magazines and newspapers. Apeldoorn still makes important contributions to the popularization of astronomy and is a member of the Meteor Section of the Dutch Society for Meteorology and Astronomy. Name proposed by the discoverers following a suggestion by F. Bettonvil, chairman of the Meteor Section.
(5902) Talima = 1987 QY10
Discovered 1987 Aug. 27 by L. G. Karachkina at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Named for Tatiana Alimovna Damir (b. 1923), friend of the discoverer, daughter of Alim Matveevich Damir (5717) and wife of Sergej Petrovich Kapitsa (5094).
(5941) Valencia = 1982 UQ6
Discovered 1982 Oct. 20 by L. G. Karachkina at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Named for the large Mediterranean seaport city in Spain, administrative center of the province of the same name and an important industrial, cultural and scientific center. Name proposed by the Institute of Theoretical Astronomy, which collaborates with the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Valencia.
(5944) Utesov = 1984 JA2
Discovered 1984 May 2 by L. G. Karachkina at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Named in memory of Leonid Osipovich Utesov (1895-1982), famous Russian singer, musician, actor, founder and artistic leader of the first Russian theatricalized jazz band (1929). The name is given by the discoverer on the occasion of one-hundredth anniversary of Utesov's birth, following a suggestion by L. R. Nemirovskij.
(5954) Epikouros = 1987 QS1
Discovered 1987 Aug. 19 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
Named for the great philosopher Epikouros (341-270 B.C.), well known for his exposition of the atomistic theory of physics, inspired by the teachings of Demokritos. He was also celebrated for his ethical teaching, to which we owe "epicurism". Living in an age when the Greeks had lost their political freedom in Macedonia, Epikouros wanted to restore mental freedom by means of his physics to ensure "quietude of the mind".
MPC

MPC 24766, 1995 FEB. 15[edit]

(grabbed on April 28, 2006)

M. P. C. 24 766 1995 FEB. 15
(6001) Thales = 1988 CP2
Discovered 1988 Feb. 11 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
Named for the famous Greek philosopher Thales of Miletus (c. 625-547 B.C.). None of Thales' writings has come down to us, but from Aristoteles we know that he was the first to suggest a single substratum (water) for the universe. The correct prediction of the solar eclipse of --584 May 28 contributed considerably to his reputation as an astronomer. Thales' significance, however, lies in the fact that he attempted to explain natural phenomena by causes within nature itself, rather than by caprices of anthropomorphic gods. He must be credited with at least five important geometrical theorems.
(6036) Weinberg = 1988 CV3
Discovered 1988 Feb. 13 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
Named in honor of Steven Weinberg, elementary-particle physicist and recipient of the 1979 Nobel Prize for Physics. Weinberg is considered one of the world's most creative scientists. He is also well known for his writings about science. In his latest book, {\it Dreams of a Final Theory}, he discusses quantum mechanics, beautiful theories, the weakness of philosophy and the honor of accepting a world without God.
(6123) Aristoteles = 1987 SH2
Discovered 1987 Sept. 19 by E. W. Elst at the Bulgarian National Observatory.
Named for Aristoteles (384-322 BC), one of the most significant Greek philosophers, charging the demerits of his philosophy on the level of the knowledge at his era and ascribing the misuse of his ideas to human weakness. He was the first, and possibly the greatest, theoretician of the mechanism of thought and deduction, being at the same time well aware of the importance of what happens in the real world and in nature. Citation prepared by A. Svarna and D. Sinachopoulos at the request of the discoverer. Proposal endorsed by V. Shkodrov.
(6183) Viscome = 1987 SF7
Discovered 1987 Sept. 26 by C. S. Shoemaker and E. M. Shoemaker at Palomar.
Named in honor of George R. Viscome (b. 1956), of Lake Placid, New York. A broadcast technician responsible for master control and videotape operations at a television station in Albany, Viscome is an accomplished astrometrist. His observations of this minor planet at the 1994 opposition were sufficient for numbering it. Name proposed by the discoverers, following a suggestion by G. V. Williams (who made the identification involving this object).
(6189) V\"olk = 1989 EY2
Discovered 1989 Mar. 2 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
Named in honour of Elisabeth V\"olk, secretary at the European Southern Observatory's headquarters in Garching, where she is chiefly responsible for the administration of the ESO Schmidt plates. During the July 1994 observing campaign on comet D/1993 F2 (Shoemaker-Levy 9) she did an excellent job solving so many problems that occurred at that hectic time. During all the years (1987-1994) of the Uccle-ESO observing program on minor planets she has become a very good friend to the discoverer. Proposal endorsed by L. D. Schmadel, who independently suggested naming a minor planet for Mrs.\ V\"olk.
EPHEMERIDES.
111P/Helin-Roman-Crockett Elements MPC 22472
Date TT R. A. (2000) Decl. Delta r Elong. Phase m2
1995 02 12 00 11.04 -02 40.0 4.713 3.991 38.7 8.9 18.0
1995 02 22 00 20.87 -01 30.9 4.790 3.979 31.4 7.4 17.9
1995 03 04 00 31.11 -00 20.3 4.851 3.967 24.2 5.9 17.9
1995 03 14 00 41.68 +00 51.2 4.894 3.955 17.2 4.3 17.8
1995 03 24 00 52.51 +02 02.8 4.920 3.943 10.4 2.6 17.7
1995 04 03 01 03.52 +03 13.9 4.927 3.931 4.5 1.1 17.6
1995 04 13 01 14.67 +04 24.0 4.917 3.920 5.0 1.3 17.6
1995 04 23 01 25.87 +05 32.5 4.890 3.908 11.0 2.8 17.7
1995 05 03 01 37.09 +06 38.7 4.845 3.896 17.6 4.5 17.8
1995 05 13 01 48.25 +07 42.2 4.784 3.884 24.2 6.1 17.8
1995 05 23 01 59.29 +08 42.5 4.707 3.872 30.8 7.7 17.9
1995 06 02 02 10.13 +09 39.2 4.615 3.860 37.6 9.2 17.9
1995 06 12 02 20.70 +10 31.7 4.509 3.849 44.4 10.6 17.9
1995 06 22 02 30.90 +11 19.8 4.390 3.837 51.3 11.9 17.9
1995 07 02 02 40.63 +12 03.0 4.261 3.826 58.3 13.1 17.8
1995 07 12 02 49.76 +12 41.1 4.122 3.814 65.5 14.0 17.8
1995 07 22 02 58.16 +13 13.7 3.976 3.803 72.9 14.8 17.7
1995 08 01 03 05.68 +13 40.6 3.824 3.792 80.5 15.3 17.7
1995 08 11 03 12.14 +14 01.6 3.669 3.780 88.5 15.5 17.6
1995 08 21 03 17.37 +14 16.5 3.513 3.769 96.8 15.5 17.5
1995 08 31 03 21.17 +14 25.1 3.361 3.758 105.5 15.0 17.3
1995 09 10 03 23.36 +14 27.5 3.214 3.748 114.6 14.1 17.2
1995 09 20 03 23.82 +14 23.7 3.078 3.737 124.2 12.8 17.1
1995 09 30 03 22.46 +14 13.9 2.957 3.726 134.4 11.1 16.9
1995 10 10 03 19.31 +13 58.7 2.854 3.716 144.9 8.9 16.7
1995 10 20 03 14.57 +13 39.0 2.774 3.706 155.9 6.3 16.5
1995 10 30 03 08.58 +13 16.4 2.721 3.695 167.0 3.5 16.3
1995 11 09 03 01.88 +12 53.0 2.697 3.685 175.8 1.1 16.2
1995 11 19 02 55.07 +12 31.2 2.703 3.676 168.1 3.2 16.3
1995 11 29 02 48.80 +12 13.7 2.738 3.666 156.8 6.1 16.5
1995 12 09 02 43.65 +12 02.8 2.802 3.657 145.6 8.8 16.6
1995 12 19 02 40.02 +11 59.9 2.888 3.647 134.6 11.1 16.8
1995 12 29 02 38.18 +12 05.9 2.995 3.638 124.1 12.9 16.9
1996 01 08 02 38.24 +12 20.8 3.117 3.629 114.0 14.3 17.1
1996 01 18 02 40.14 +12 44.0 3.249 3.621 104.4 15.3 17.2
1996 01 28 02 43.82 +13 14.6 3.387 3.612 95.2 15.8 17.3
1996 02 07 02 49.11 +13 51.3 3.528 3.604 86.5 15.8 17.4
1996 02 17 02 55.86 +14 32.7 3.667 3.596 78.1 15.6 17.5
1996 02 27 03 03.90 +15 17.7 3.802 3.589 70.2 15.0 17.5
1996 03 08 03 13.09 +16 04.8 3.930 3.581 62.5 14.2 17.5
1996 03 18 03 23.26 +16 53.0 4.050 3.574 55.1 13.2 17.6
1996 03 28 03 34.32 +17 41.1 4.158 3.567 47.9 12.0 17.6
1996 04 07 03 46.12 +18 28.1 4.255 3.560 41.0 10.6 17.6
1996 04 17 03 58.56 +19 13.3 4.339 3.554 34.2 9.1 17.6
C/1994 T1 (Machholz) Elements MPC 24711
Date TT R. A. (2000) Decl. Delta r Elong. Phase m1
1995 02 12 02 58.16 -06 23.4 2.467 2.462 78.1 23.1 13.9
1995 02 22 03 02.51 -07 27.8 2.707 2.541 69.8 21.4 14.2
1995 03 04 03 08.27 -08 17.1 2.934 2.621 62.2 19.5 14.5
1995 03 14 03 15.10 -08 57.7 3.145 2.704 55.2 17.6 14.8
1995 03 24 03 22.74 -09 34.0 3.339 2.788 49.0 15.6 15.1
1995 04 03 03 31.00 -10 09.5 3.515 2.873 43.5 13.9 15.3
1995 04 13 03 39.71 -10 46.9 3.670 2.960 39.1 12.3 15.5
1995 04 23 03 48.75 -11 28.2 3.805 3.047 35.8 11.1 15.7
1995 05 03 03 58.01 -12 15.3 3.920 3.135 34.0 10.3 15.9
1995 05 13 04 07.38 -13 09.8 4.014 3.223 33.7 10.0 16.1
1995 05 23 04 16.77 -14 12.9 4.090 3.312 35.0 10.1 16.3
1995 06 02 04 26.07 -15 25.7 4.147 3.401 37.6 10.5 16.4
1995 06 12 04 35.19 -16 49.6 4.187 3.490 41.4 11.1 16.5
1995 06 22 04 44.04 -18 25.1 4.212 3.579 45.9 11.8 16.7
1995 07 02 04 52.50 -20 13.1 4.224 3.669 50.9 12.4 16.8
1995 07 12 05 00.44 -22 14.3 4.225 3.758 56.4 13.0 16.9
1995 07 22 05 07.74 -24 28.6 4.218 3.848 62.0 13.5 17.0
1995 08 01 05 14.23 -26 56.1 4.207 3.937 67.8 13.8 17.1
1995 08 11 05 19.73 -29 36.0 4.193 4.027 73.6 14.0 17.2
1995 08 21 05 24.04 -32 27.0 4.180 4.116 79.4 14.0 17.3
1995 08 31 05 26.93 -35 27.2 4.173 4.205 84.9 13.8 17.3
1995 09 10 05 28.10 -38 33.5 4.173 4.293 90.0 13.6 17.4
1995 09 20 05 27.30 -41 42.0 4.184 4.382 94.7 13.2 17.5
1995 09 30 05 24.21 -44 47.8 4.208 4.470 98.6 12.8 17.6
1995 10 10 05 18.57 -47 45.0 4.249 4.558 101.7 12.4 17.7
1995 10 20 05 10.24 -50 27.5 4.306 4.646 103.9 12.0 17.8
1995 10 30 04 59.22 -52 49.0 4.380 4.733 104.9 11.7 18.0
1995 11 09 04 45.84 -54 44.1 4.472 4.820 104.8 11.5 18.1
1995 11 19 04 30.77 -56 08.8 4.579 4.907 103.7 11.3 18.2
1995 11 29 04 14.95 -57 01.5 4.701 4.994 101.6 11.2 18.3
1995 12 09 03 59.50 -57 23.4 4.835 5.080 98.8 11.0 18.5
1995 12 19 03 45.44 -57 17.8 4.979 5.166 95.5 10.9 18.6
1995 12 29 03 33.52 -56 49.6 5.129 5.252 91.8 10.8 18.8
MPC

Discrepancies between Schmadel and IPA[edit]

In comparing the Schmadel and Institute of Applied Astronomy lists of accented names, a few discrepancies crop up. In what follows, the ASCII names are from the MPC.

Schmadel omissions[edit]

Number ASCII IPA Schmadel Notes
707 Steina Ste\"\i na Steina Herget confirms the diaeresis

Likely Schmadel omissions[edit]

Number ASCII IPA Schmadel Notes
2256 Wisniewski Wi\'sniewski Wisniewski Correct Polish spelling is indeed s acute
10095 Johannlowe Johannl\"owe Johannlowe Johann Carl Gottfried Loewe, German composer, is written Löwe in German, so IPA is likely right
12323 Hackel H\"ackel Haeckel (Ernst Heinrich Philipp August (von) Haeckel, German biologist and philosopher) 28 June: IPA states the a diaeresis is the MPC transcription; however, "Häckel" is not attested anywhere
22978 Nyrola Nyr\"ol\"a Nyrola 28 June: IPA states this is the MPC transcription; [1] also attests the IPA spelling

Schmadel additions[edit]

Number ASCII IPA Schmadel Notes
806 Gyldenia Gyldenia Gyld\'enia Herget confirms the unaccented e

Likely Schmadel additions[edit]

Number ASCII IPA Schmadel Notes
5628 Preussen Preussen Preu\ss en Even German sites such as [2] write "preussen" and "preussischen"
8318 Averroes Averroes Averro\"es Correct spelling is e grave, not e diaeresis
11050 Messiaen Messiaen Messia\"en Correct spelling omits the diaeresis
18624 Prevert Prevert Pr\'evert 28 June: IPA states the MPC transcription omits the e acute; however it is true that Prévert is the correct French spelling
20074 Laskerschueler Laskerschueler Laskersch\"uler (Else Lasker-Schüler, German Jewish poet) 28 June: IPA states the MPC transcription is "ue", and u diaeresis is usually transcribed "ue"

IPA errors[edit]

Number ASCII IPA Schmadel Notes
1296 Andree Andre\'e Andr\'ee Herget confirms the correct spelling "Andrée" (28 June: IPA has corrected this)
8422 Mohorovicic Mohorovi\v c\'\i c Mohorovi\v ci\'c c acute is correct (see e.g. [3], [4]) (before 28 June)
8422 Mohorovicic Mohorovi\v{c}\i\'c Mohorovi\v ci\'c c acute is correct (see e.g. [5], [6]); dotless i is normally peculiar to Turkish (28 June: IPA states their TeX transcription is from the MPC, September 2002)
9429 Porec Pore\v c Pore\v c Error is in IPA's ASCII: "Porevc" (28 June: IPA has corrected this)
9641 Demaziere Demaz\`ere Demazi\`ere Error is in IPA's ASCII as well: "Demazere" (28 June: IPA has corrected this)
9657 Ucka U\v cka U\v cka Error is in IPA's ASCII: "Uvcka" (28 June: IPA has corrected this)
16929 Hurnik Hur\'\i k Hurn\'\i k IPA drops the n in its ASCII as well (28 June: IPA has corrected this)

Likely IPA errors[edit]

Number ASCII IPA Schmadel Notes
5583 Braunerova Braunerov\`a Braunerov\'a a acute is the correct Czech spelling: see e.g. [7], [8] (28 June: IPA has corrected this)
59793 Clapies Clapi\'es Clapi\`es Jean de Clapiès (also written Clapiez), French mathematician, engineer, hydrographer, and astronomer (1670-1740) [9] [10] [11]. July 11 update: IPA confirms the e grave and corrected its list.

Schmadel errors[edit]

Number ASCII IPA Schmadel Notes
11134 Ceske Budejovice \v Cesk\'e Bud\v ejovice \v Cesk\'e Budejovice Schmadel omits the e caron wrongly
21873 Jindrichuvhradec Jind\v rich\accent23uvhradec Jind\v rich\accent 23uvhra Schmadel truncates the transcription
37432 Piszkesteto Piszk\'estet\Ho Piszk\'estet\"o o diaeresis is incorrect; o double acute is correct

Likely Schmadel errors[edit]

Number ASCII IPA Schmadel Notes
1856 Ruzena R\accent23u\v zena Ru\v zena 28 June: IPA states the u boll is from the MPC transcription; however, sources such as [12] seem to indicate the u boll is not attested

Differing TeX transcriptions[edit]

These discrepancies are minor, since the resulting diacriticals are identical:

Number ASCII IPA Schmadel Notes
2599 Veseli Vesel\'\i Vesel\'\i\/
2811 Stremchovi St\v remchov\'\i St\v remchov\'\i\/
4090 Risehvezd \v R\'\i \v sehv\v ezd \v R\'\i\v sehv\v ezd
5460 Tsenaat'a'i Ts\'enaat'a'\'\i Ts\'enaat'a'\'\i\/
6654 Lulea Lule\aa Lule\aa Normally the a boll transcribes "aa", so the ASCII should be "Luleaa" (which is what Schmadel uses), but the MPC systematically transcribes a boll as "a" (28 June: IPA will adhere to the MPC ASCII)
7699 Bozek Bo\v zek Bo\v{z}ek
8536 Mans M\aans M\aa ns Normally the a boll transcribes "aa", so the ASCII should be "Maans", but the MPC systematically transcribes a boll as "a" (which is what Schmadel uses in this instance)
9358 Faro F\aar\"o F\aa r\"o Normally the a boll transcribes "aa", so the ASCII should be "Faaro" (which is what Schmadel uses), but the MPC systematically transcribes a boll as "a" (28 June: IPA will adhere to the MPC ASCII)
10577 Jihcesmuzeum Jih\v cesmuzeum Jih\v{c}esmuzeum
12867 Joeloic Jo\"elo\"\i c Jo\"elo\"{\i}c
14054 Dusek Du\v sek Du\v{s}ek
15053 Bochnicek Bochn\'\i \v cek Bochn\'\i\v cek
17600 Dobrichovice Dob\v richovice Dob\v{r}ichovice
18497 Nevezice Nev\v ezice Nev\v{e}zice
20496 Jenik Jen\'\i k Jen\'{\i}k
20497 Marenka Ma\v renka Ma\v{r}enka
21257 Jizni Cechy Ji\v zn\'\i \v Cechy Ji\v zn\'\i\/ \v Cechy
26328 Litomysl Litomy\v sl Litomy\v{s}l
26970 Elias Eli\'a\v s Eli\'a\v{s}
26971 Sezimovo Usti Sezimovo \'Ust\'\i Sezimovo \'Ust\'{\i}
26986 Caslavska \v C\'aslavsk\'a \v{C}\'aslavsk\'a
27079 Vsetin Vset\'\i n Vset\'{\i}n
27132 Jezek Je\v zek Je\v{z}ek
29476 Kvicala Kv\'\i \v cala Kv\'\i\v cala
29824 Kalmancok Kalman\v cok Kalman\v{c}ok
31650 Frydek-Mistek Fr\'ydek-M\'\i stek Fr\'ydek-M\'{\i}stek
33377 Vecernicek Ve\v cern\'\i \v cek Ve\v cern\'\i\v cek
34753 Zdenekmatyas Zden\v ekmaty\'a\v s Zden\v{e}kmaty\'a\v{s}
35446 Stana St\'a\v na St\'a\v{n}a
36060 Babuska Babu\v ska Babu\v{s}ka
36888 Skrabal \v Skrabal \v{S}krabal
37939 Hasler Ha\v sler Ha\v{s}ler
38674 Tesinsko T\v e\v s\'\i nsko T\v{e}\v{s}\'{\i}nsko
40410 Prihoda P\v r\'\i hoda P\v{r}\'{\i}hoda
42487 Angstrom \AAngstr\"om {\AA}ngstr\"om
43667 Dumlupinar Dumlup\i nar Dumlup{\i}nar
53159 Myslivecek Myslive\v cek Myslive\v{c}ek
53285 Mojmir Mojm\'\i r Mojm\'{\i}r
59419 Presov Pre\v sov Pre\v{s}ov
61404 Ocenasek O\v cen\'a\v sek O\v{c}en\'a\v{s}ek

Urhixidur 02:58, 2005 Jun 13 (UTC)

June 28, 2005 update[edit]

Nikolay Zheleznov of the IPA was kind enough to look into the discrepancies I pointed out to him. His responses have been integrated in the text above, which resulted in some entries being reclassified.

Urhixidur 2005 June 28 14:27 (UTC)

Further update: the IPA pages currently (as I write this) transcribe the e-caron (ě, TeX \v e) as e-breve (ĕ, TeX \u e) in 11 of 12 cases. This has been reported and will probably be fixed shortly.

Urhixidur 2005 June 29 17:22 (UTC)

September 29, 2005 update[edit]

Just for the record, the diacriticals.txt used by AstOrb Browser use the IPA diacriticals with three exceptions:

  • (8422) Mohorovi\v ci \'c
  • (18624) Pr\'evert
  • (20074) Laskersch\"uler

Urhixidur 02:46, 30 September 2005 (UTC)

May 4, 2008 update[edit]

The IPA e-mail is not functional (my sendings bounce), so I'm unable to discuss further discrepancies with Nikolaj. The following errors currently mar the IPA pages:

  • (33179) Ars\'enewenger (should be Ars\`enewenger)
  • (58709) Zenocol\'o (should be Zenocol\`o)
  • (72071) Gabor (should be G\'abor)

The correct spellings appear on the JPS SSD pages.

Urhixidur (talk) 22:56, 4 May 2008 (UTC)

http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/ECS/NewCitations.txt[edit]

The page's contents do not seem to be archived anywhere (it is replaced, not appended to!), so we'll have to do so here. Unless there's a better place --maybe Wikisource?

Urhixidur 00:38, 2005 July 23 (UTC)

It has now become apparent that these citations are becoming available online through the MPES (Minor Planet Ephemeris Service) and the JPL Small-Body Database Browser. References to the following "archives" will be progressively removed from the Meanings of asteroid names pages.

Urhixidur 03:00, 3 July 2006 (UTC)

All done. --Urhixidur 17:07, 19 July 2006 (UTC)

September 20, 2005 contents[edit]

(4137) Crabtree = 1970 WC
Discovered 1970 Nov. 24 by L. Kohoutek at Bergedorf.
William Crabtree (1610-1644), a cloth merchant in Salford, near Manchester, became the second person knowingly to observe a transit of Venus, after he had been alerted to the 1639 event by Jeremiah Horrocks.
(5056) Rahua = 1986 RQ5
Discovered 1986 Sept. 9 by H. Debehogne at the European Southern Observatory.
According to Inca legend, Rahua, Ocllo, Cora and Huaco were the wives of the four sons of Pirua Wiracocha, creator god of civilization, sometimes associated with the Pleiades, and for whom the nation of Peru is named.
(5416) Estremadoyro = 1978 VE5
Discovered 1978 Nov. 7 by E. F. Helin and S. J. Bus at Palomar.
Peruvian astronomer V\'{\i}ctor Antol\'{\i} Estremadoyro Robles (1913-2003), professor of astronomy and a structural engineer, founded the Peruvian Association of Astronomy (1946) and the Iberoamerican League of Astronomy in 1958. The latter association unites institutions in 26 different countries.
(6942) Yurigulyaev = 1976 YB2
Discovered 1976 Dec. 16 by L. I. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Yuri Vasil'evich Gulyaev (b. 1935) is the director of the Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics in Moscow and a prominent specialist in the fields of solid state physics, radio science, electronics and computer sciences.
(6959) Mikkelkocha = 1988 VD1
Discovered 1988 Nov. 3 by P. Jensen at Brorfelde.
Mikkel Kock Augustesen (b. 2004) is grandson of the observer at the Schmidt telescope in Brorfelde.
(8431) Haseda = 1997 YQ13
Discovered 1997 Dec. 31 by T. Kobayashi at Oizumi.
Haseda Kastumi (b. 1945) is an amateur astronomer in Aichi prefecture. During 2000-2002 he discovered the four novae V463 Sct, V1178 Sco, V2540 Oph and V4743 Sgr. He has also discovered 65 new variables, including some Wolf-Rayet stars.
(9648) Gotouhideo = 1995 UB9
Discovered 1995 Oct. 30 by F. Uto at Kashihara.
Gotou Hideo (b. 1951) is a Japanese amateur astronomer who was born in Oogaki, Gifu prefecture. He has coordinated an observatory at Ooto-mura and also designed a 0.25-m reflector there after he graduated from Doshisha University.
(9964) Hideonoguchi = 1992 CF1
Discovered 1992 Feb. 13 by T. Seki at Geisei.
Hideo Noguchi (1876-1928), a bacteriologist from Inawasiro, Fukusima prefecture, made significant achievements at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. He died of yellow fever in Africa while researching the disease. Burns he suffered as a child turned him to the study of medicine.
(10078) Stanthorpe = 1989 UJ3
Discovered 1989 Oct. 30 by T. Seki at Geisei.
Stanthorpe, known as Queensland's wine capital, is a town nestled in national parks on the highlands in the southeastern part of the Australian state. It is also known for fruit production and beautiful night skies. The name was suggested by E. Kato.
(11140) Yakedake = 1997 AP1
Discovered 1997 Jan. 2 by T. Kobayashi at Oizumi.
One of the 100 most celebrated mountains of Japan, Yakedake is a small smoking volcano, a beautiful feature of the Kamikouchi highland. NearbyTaishoike pond in the Kamikouchi highland is another famous beauty spot in Japan. It was made from the eruption of Yakedake in 1915.
(11444) Peshekhonov = 1978 QA2
Discovered 1978 Aug. 31 by N. S. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Vladimir Grigor'evich Peshekhonov (b. 1934), director of the Central Scientific Research Institute "Electropribor", St.\ Petersburg, is a prominent specialist in naval and space navigation. He has developed a number of high-precision inertial navigation systems for sea vessels and mobile gravimeters for use on the sea shelf.
(11736) Viktorfischl = 1998 QS1
Discovered 1998 Aug. 19 by L. \v{S}arounov\'a at Ond\v{r}ejov.
The frequently translated Czech-Israeli writer Viktor Fischl Avigdor Dagan (b. 1912) put ethical values into literature through his stylistic and linguistic mastery, in which he emphasizes responsibility for interpersonal relations, love, tolerance and respect.
(12220) Semenchur = 1982 UD6
Discovered 1982 Oct. 20 by L. G. Karachkina at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Semen Ivanovich Churyumov (b. 1934), doctor of philosophy and socionics, was for many years senior lecturer in the mathematics department at the Kiev National Aviation University.
(12370) Kageyasu = 1994 GB9
Discovered 1994 Apr. 11 by S. Ueda and H. Kaneda at Kushiro.
Takahashi Kageyasu (1785-1829) was the chief astronomer of the shogunal government of Japan. He was among the first to compile and publish maps of the world and East Asia based on the latest knowledge then available in scientific geography. He also established the book office of Western culture in 1811.
(13010) Germantitov = 1986 QR5
Discovered 1986 Aug. 29 by L. V. Zhuravleva at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Pilot-cosmonaut German Stepanovich Titov (1935-2000) accomplished the first lasting cosmic flight on 1961 Aug.\ 6-7. The orbital spaceship ``Vostok-2'' with Titov on board circled the earth 17 times. He was the backup pilot to Yurij Gagarin. He wrote a number of books on cosmology.
(13350) Gmelin = 1998 ST144
Discovered 1998 Sept. 20 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
Johan Georg Gmelin (1709-1755) was a German naturalist who was appointed professor of chemistry and natural history at the University of St.\ Petersburg in 1731. From 1733 to 1743 he traveled through Siberia and his investigations were recorded in {\it Flora Sibiria} (1749-1750) and {\it Reise durch Sibirien} (1753).
(13533) Junili = 1991 RJ11
Discovered 1991 Sept. 4 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
The troika of daughters June (1985), Nina (1987) and Lian (1988) give much joy and enlightenment to their parents, psychologist Theo Geuens and his companion Rita Heirman. They are majoring in sociology, mathematics and childhood education, respectively.
(13560) La P\'erouse = 1992 RX6
Discovered 1992 Sept. 2 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
In 1785 French navigator Jean-Fran\c{c}ois Galoup, Comte de La P\'erouse (1741-1788), sailed along the coast of South and North America and across the Pacific to China and Australia. In 1788, his ships {\it L'Astrolabe} and {\it La Boussole} vanished without a trace. The strait between Hokkaido and Sakhalin is named for him.
(13647) Rey = 1996 HR24
Discovered 1996 Apr. 20 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
In Amsterdam from 1744 onward, Marc-Michel Rey (1720-1780) was a major figure in the publishing history of the Enlightenment. Manuscripts were smuggled out of France and found their way to Amsterdam, where they were printed and brought back to France clandestinely.
(13770) Commerson = 1998 ST145
Discovered 1998 Sept. 20 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
Philibert Commerson (1727-1773) was a French naturalist, botanist and explorer. In 1764 he joined Bougainville on the frigate {\it Boudeuse} to circumnavigate the world. Near Rio de Janeiro he found a vivid colorful vine, which upon his suggestion was named Bougainvillea by the French botanist de Jussieu.
(13788) Dansolander = 1998 UY26
Discovered 1998 Oct. 18 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
Swedish botanist Daniel Solander (1733-1782) joined James Cook on the {\it Endeavour}, the ship that was sent by the Royal Society to the South Seas to observe the June 1769 transit of Venus. During this voyage he collected about a thousand different species of plants, none of which was then known in Europe.
(13956) Banks = 1990 VG6
Discovered 1990 Nov. 15 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
British botanist Joseph Banks (1743-1820) joined James Cook on the {\it Endeavour}. He proposed an experiment to move {\it en masse} a food crop (namely, breadfruit) from one location to another. The first mission, under the command of Captain Bligh, was doomed to fail, but the second in 1791 was successful.
(14349) Nikitamikhalkov = 1985 UQ4
Discovered 1985 Oct. 22 by L. V. Zhuravleva at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Russian film director Nikita Sergeevich Mikhalkov (b. 1945) has also acted in more than 40 films. He received awards from Cannes and Venice, and won an Oscar for the Best Foreign Film, {\it Burnt by the Sun\/} (1994). Since Dec.\ 1997 he has been chairman of the Cinematographers' Union of Russia.
(15845) Bambi = 1995 UC17
Discovered 1995 Oct. 17 by Spacewatch at Kitt Peak.
Bambi was a fictional young deer in Walt Disney's 1942 animated eponymous film. Bambi's fate has been an emotional experience for generations of children the world over. The name was suggested by R. Jedicke and P. Jedicke.
(16192) Laird = 2000 AU207
Discovered 2000 Jan. 4 by Spacewatch at Kitt Peak.
Canadian physicist Elizabeth Rebecca Laird (1874-1969) was known for her research on soft x-rays, the Raman effect and the effects of microwave radiation on biological materials. As head of the physics department at Mt.\ Holyoke College from 1904 to 1940 she inspired many women to pursue scientific careers.
(16463) Nayoro = 1990 EK
Discovered 1990 Mar. 2 by K. Endate and K. Watanabe at Kitami.
The city of Nayoro, with a population around 30~000, is situated in north-central Hokkaido. It has thrived because of the forestry, agriculture and dairy industries of the Nayoro basin.
(16528) Terakado = 1991 GV
Discovered 1991 Apr. 2 by K. Endate and K. Watanabe at Kitami.
Kazuo Terakado (b. 1947), a leading scientific journalist in Japan, has made a significant contribution to the popularization of science through his leadership in the science magazines. He is the author of numerous books, including {\it Deep Space} and {\it Solar System Guidebook}.
(16626) Thumper = 1993 HJ3
Discovered 1993 Apr. 20 by Spacewatch at Kitt Peak.
Thumper was a fictional young rabbit in Walt Disney's 1942 animated film, {\it Bambi}. Thumper's wisecracks and antics have been comic relief for generations of children the world over. The name was suggested by R. Jedicke and P. Jedicke.
(17720) Manuboccuni = 1997 XH10
Discovered 1997 Dec. 7 by M. Tombelli at Cima Ekar.
Emanuele Boccuni (b. 1969) is a composer of new age music, many of his compositions referring to the sky. He composed {\it The night and the stars} for the discoverer.
(18238) Frankshu = 1241 T-2
Discovered 1973 Sept. 29 by C. J. van Houten and I. van Houten-Groeneveld on Palomar Schmidt plates taken by T. Gehrels.
Frank Shu (b. 1943), president of National Tsinghua University in Taiwan and former professor at the University of California in Berkeley, is well known for his fundamental contributions to the theory of star formation.
(18241) Genzel = 1325 T-2
Discovered 1973 Sept. 29 by C. J. van Houten and I. van Houten-Groeneveld on Palomar Schmidt plates taken by T. Gehrels.
Reinhard Genzel (b. 1952), director of the Max-Planck Institut f\"ur Extraterrestrische Physik and professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is known for his pioneering work in infrared astronomy and his quest to discover the presence of a black hole in the Galactic Center.
(18244) Anneila = 3008 T-2
Discovered 1973 Sept. 30 by C. J. van Houten and I. van Houten-Groeneveld on Palomar Schmidt plates taken by T. Gehrels.
Anneila Sargent (b. 1942), professor at the California Institute for Technology and director of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, is known for her ground-breaking observations of protoplanetary disks around young stars using emerging millimeter interferometers.
(18845) Cichocki = 1999 RY27
Discovered 1999 Sept. 7 by H. Miku\v{z} at \v{C}rni Vrh Observatory.
Bruno Cichocki (1908-2001) was a civil engineer with a vivid interest in astronomy.
(20070) Koichiyuko = 1993 XL
Discovered 1993 Dec. 8 by T. Kobayashi at Oizumi.
Koichi Takahashi (b. 1958) has been director of the Hiroshima Chapter of the Young Astronauts Club of Japan since 1998. His wife Yuko (b. 1958) enthusiastically helps in his activities. Koichi is a medical doctor and Yuko a pharmacist.
(23030) Jimkennedy = 1999 XR7
Discovered 1999 Dec. 4 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills.
James R. Kennedy (b. 1941) performed radio astronomy research at Arecibo and the University of Florida, then became the project manager of the GONG Project at the National Solar Observatory and associate director of the Gemini Observatory for Operations.
(25302) Niim = 1998 XW3
Discovered 1998 Dec. 9 by N. Sato at Chichibu.
Yoshihiro Niim is an engineer who made substantial contributions to the Hayabusa mission, which is designed to return a surface sample from (25143) Itokawa, and to the launch of the Japanese large rocket H-II A7 at Tanegashima Space Center.
(27150) Annasante = 1998 YQ3
Discovered 1998 Dec. 16 at Osservatorio San Vittore.
Anna Mazzi (b. 1934) and Sante Colombini (b. 1933) are celebrating 50 years of marriage. They are the parents of Ermes Colombini, one of the discoverers of this minor planet.
(30840) Jackalice = 1991 GC2
Discovered 1991 Apr. 15 by C. S. Shoemaker and D. H. Levy at Palomar.
Jack Newton (b. 1942) is a Canadian astrophotographer credited with some of the most famous ground-based photographs ever taken. His work, from the sun to a gravitational lens, has appeared in major news magazines. His wife Alice has long assisted him in every one of his outreach efforts, in both Canada and the U.S.
(30935) Davasobel = 1994 AK1
Discovered 1994 Jan. 8 by C. S. Shoemaker and D. H. Levy at Palomar.
Dava Sobel (b. 1947) is an author whose books have inspired a serious interest in the history of science among her millions of readers. Her most famous books---{\it Longitude}, {\it Galileo's Daughter} and {\it The Planets}---provide new insights into the most important historical issues in the evolution of scientific thought.
(33529) Henden = 1999 HA1
Discovered 1999 Apr. 19 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills.
Arne A. Henden (b. 1950) coauthored {\it Astronomical Photometry} in 1982. He is currently director of the American Association of Variable Star Observers, and he served on the staff of the U.S.\ Naval Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, from 1993 to 2005.
(33799) Myra = 1999 UV2
Discovered 1999 Oct. 19 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills.
Myra J. Halpin (b. 1946) was a finalist in both NASA's Teacher in Space (1985) and Educator Astronaut Teacher (2004) competitions. She has taught science at the high school and college level since 1969 and in July 2005 was appointed Dean of Sciences at North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics.
(33800) Gross = 1999 VB7
Discovered 1999 Nov. 8 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills.
John Gross (b. 1959), an amateur astronomer, operates an automated remote access (via Internet) observatory in Sonoita, Arizona, used for research on minor planets and variable stars.
(37588) Lynnecox = 1991 GA2
Discovered 1991 Apr. 15 by C. S. Shoemaker and D. H. Levy at Palomar.
The long-distance swims of Lynne Cox (b. 1957), especially across the Bering Strait in near-freezing waters in 1987, have inspired the world. Her 2004 book {\it Swimming to Antarctica} contains beautifully worded descriptions of astronomical phenomena, such as the aurora borealis, witnessed during her nighttime swims.
(38454) Boroson = 1999 TB2
Discovered 1999 Oct. 2 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills.
Todd A. Boroson (b. 1954) studies the spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei. He is the deputy director of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory in Tucson, Arizona, and also leads the NOAO Data Products and the Telescope System Instrumentation programs.
(41049) Van Citters = 1999 VC9
Discovered 1999 Nov. 9 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills.
G. Wayne Van Citters (b. 1947) is the astronomical sciences division director at the U.S.\ National Science Foundation, and the NSF project manager for the Gemini Observatory. His interests include high energy astrophysics, high speed photometry and polarization.
(48628) Janetfender = 1995 RD
Discovered 1995 Sept. 7 by AMOS at Haleakala.
Janet Fender, chief scientist of the Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory, is personally responsible for initiating the contact between Eleanor Helin of JPL and Paul Kervin of AMOS, resulting in AMOS support for the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking program.
(48778) Shokoyukako = 1997 RE
Discovered 1997 Sept. 1 by H. Abe at Yatsuka.
Shoko (b. 1989) and Yukako Abe (b. 1992) are the discoverer's daughters.
(59804) Dickjoyce = 1999 RJ1
Discovered 1999 Sept. 5 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills.
Richard R. Joyce (b. 1944) is an astronomer at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory who studies late-type stars and mass loss using infrared spectroscopy. He is also an expert in infrared instrumentation development.
(61195) Martinoli = 2000 OU2
Discovered 2000 July 28 by S. Sposetti at Gnosca.
Piero Martinoli (b. 1941) is professor of physics and leader of the superconductivity research group at the University of Neuchatel.
(61384) Arturoromer = 2000 QW
Discovered 2000 Aug. 22 by S. Sposetti at Gnosca.
Arturo Romer (b. 1944) studied physics and mathematics. He directed the Liceo Cantonale Locarno and is now director of the association Elettricit\`a della Svizzera Italiana.
(65357) Antoniucci = 2002 NR55
Discovered 2002 July 12 by the Campo Imperatore Near Earth Object Survey.
Simone Antoniucci (b. 1977) obtained his degree in physics at ``La Sapienza'' University of Rome in 2003, with a thesis on infrared spectroscopy of protostars. He is currently a Ph.D.\ student in Astronomy at Tor Vergata University, Rome, studying Young Stellar Objects using infrared high resolution spectroscopy and interferometry.
(65885) Lubenow = 1997 YF20
Discovered 1997 Dec. 27 by M. W. Buie at the Anderson Mesa Station of the Lowell Observatory.
Alexander (Andy) F. Lubenow (b. 1956), the program coordinator at the Space Telescope Science Institute, has provided exceptional support to the Hubble Space Telescope as an innovator and expert observation planner, especially for solar system targets, over the lifetime of HST.
(66667) Kambi\v{c} = 1999 TZ11
Discovered 1999 Oct. 8 at \v{C}rni Vrh Observatory.
Bojan Kambi\v{c} (b. 1959) is the founder and editor of the first Slovenian astronomical magazine {\it Spika}, regularly published since 1993. {\it Spika} greatly influenced the Slovenian astronomical community, boosted various astronomical activities and thoroughly changed the face of astronomy in Slovenia.
(68410) Nichols = 2001 QB154
Discovered 2001 Aug. 16 by M. Collins and M. White at Anza.
Nichelle Nichols (b. 1936) is best known for her role as Lt.\ Nyota Uhura in the {\it Star Trek} series. She has also been a global ambassador for NASA, a recruiter of astronauts and an inspirer of millions as an author of science fiction. She stands undaunted in her belief that humankind must seek new knowledge.
(68448) Sidneywolff = 2001 SW4
Discovered 2001 Sept. 18 by C. W. Juels and P. R. Holvorcem at Fountain Hills.
Sidney C. Wolff (b. 1941), director of Kitt Peak National Observatory (1984-1987) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (1987-2001), was president of the American Astronomical Society (1992-1994) and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (1985-1986) and a founding editor of the {\it Astronomy Education Review}.
(73442) Feruglio = 2002 NE5
Discovered 2002 July 10 by the Campo Imperatore Near Earth Object Survey.
Chiara Feruglio (b. 1978) obtained her degree in astronomy at the University of Padua in 2003, with a thesis on spectroscopy of Seyfert galaxies. Currently a Ph.D.\ student at the University of Tor Vergata in Rome, she is studying the properties of accretion onto super massive black holes.
(73533) Alonso = 2003 OC6
Discovered 2003 July 25 at the Observatorio Astronomico de Mallorca.
Fernando Alonso (b. 1981) was born in Oviedo, Spain. He is the country's most successful Formula One racing driver. With his victory at the 2003 Hungarian Grand Prix he became the youngest winner in the history of Formula One, at just 22 years and 16 days old. His success has spawned ``Alonsomania in Spain.
(74509) Gillett = 1999 FG7
Discovered 1999 Mar. 22 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills.
Frederick C. Gillett (1937-2001), a pioneer in infrared astronomy, was the discoverer of the infrared excess of Vega in 1983 using the Infrared Astronomy Satellite. The Gemini North 8-m Telescope was renamed the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini Telescope in his honor on 2002 Nov. 18.
(74824) Tarter = 1999 TJ16
Discovered 1999 Oct. 12 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills.
Jill C. Tarter (b. 1944) searches for extra-terrestrial intelligence at the SETI Institute using radio telescopes while holding the Bernard M. Oliver Chair for SETI. Her career inspired Carl Sagan to write {\it Contact}. She has also encouraged thousands to assist SETI discovery using their home computers.
(78125) Salimbeni = 2002 NU6
Discovered 2002 July 11 by the Campo Imperatore Near Earth Object Survey.
Sara Salimbeni (b. 1977) obtained her degree in physics at ``La Sapienza'' University of Rome in 2003, with a thesis on the cosmological evolution of the deep field galaxy luminosity function. As a Ph.D.\ student at the University of Rome at Tor Vergata, she is continuing her studies of galaxies and structures evolution.
(78431) Kemble = 2002 QJ50
Discovered 2002 Aug. 16 by A. Lowe on images taken at Palomar.
Lucian J. Kemble (1922-1999) was a Franciscan Father ordained in 1953. Multi-talented, he was an avid amateur astronomer with a particular interest in deep-sky observing. In 1980, he drew attention to a chain of stars in the constellation of Camelopardalis that is now known as Kemble's Cascade.
(78816) Caripito = 2003 PZ9
Discovered 2003 Aug. 4 by J. Dellinger at Needville.
Caripito, Bolivar district, Monagas, Venezuela, is a town on the San Juan river near the Gulf of Paria. From the 1930s through the 1960s it served as a camp town for the Quiriquire oil field. The parents of the discoverer, Thomas Baynes Dellinger (b. 1926) and Mar\'{\i}a de la Garza Cant\'u (b. 1928), met there in 1949.
(79144) Cervantes = 1992 CM3
Discovered 1992 Feb. 2 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) was a Spanish novelist best known for {\it Don Quijote} (1605). In his eight comic sketches {\it Entremeses}, he introduced elements from the novel, creating clear pictures of the everyday life of his time. His first major work was {\it La Galatea} (1585).
(79353) Andrewalday = 1997 AF16
Discovered 1997 Jan. 13 by the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) project on Haleakala.
Andrew Alday is a key member of the Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing (AMOS) team, which supports a number of minor planet programs.
(79912) Terrell = 1999 CC3
Discovered 1999 Feb. 10 by W. R. Cooney, Jr. and E. Kandler at Baton Rouge.
Dirk Terrell (b. 1965) is a stellar astrophysicist, author and astronomical artist, specializing in eclipsing binary stars. He has authored numerous journal publications and a book and is well-known for his constant support and dedicated mentoring of amateur astronomers.
(83464) Irishmccalla = 2001 SM73
Discovered 2001 Sept. 19 by R. Tucker at the Goodricke-Pigott Observatory.
Nellie Elizabeth ``Irish'' McCalla (1929-2002) was an American film actress and artist. She produced over 1000 paintings and numerous limited-edition lithographs. She was a member of Woman Artists of the American West. Her art often featured themes from the Old West and the sweet innocence of youth.
(85320) Bertram = 1995 EP8
Discovered 1995 Mar. 4 by F. B\"orngen at Tautenburg.
Bertram von Minden (1340?--1414?) is a main representative of the late Gothic North German painting (altar-pieces for the St.-Petri-Church in Hamburg) and one of the earliest historical fixed masters. Bertram is also the youngest grandson (b. 2002) of the discoverer.
(89956) Leibacher = 2002 LJ5
Discovered 2002 June 6 by C. W. Juels and P. R. Holvorcem at Fountain Hills.
John W. Leibacher (b. 1941) is the principal investigator of the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) project that studies the physics of the solar interior at six locations around the world. He is former director of the National Solar Observatory.
(90817) Doylehall = 1995 RO
Discovered 1995 Sept. 1 by AMOS at Haleakala.
Doyle Hall is an astronomer and a key member of the Air Force Maui and Supercomputing (AMOS) team, which supports a number of minor planet programs, including JPL's Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking program.
(93061) Barbagallo = 2000 SX20
Discovered 2000 Sept. 23 at Osservatorio San Vittore.
Mariano Barbagallo (1933-2005) was an exemplary Italian father, patient and generous with his four sons, retiree of a bank, former colleague and great friend of Ermes Colombini, one of the discoverers of this minor planet.
(94400) Hongdaeyong = 2001 SG267
Discovered 2001 Sept. 25 by Y.-B. Jeon, Y.-H. Park and K.-J. Choo at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory.
Hong Daeyong (1731-1783), a scientist in the late Chosun Dynasty, worked to overcome old, conventional cosmology in Korea and advocated new concepts introduced through China. He also invented numerous astronomical instruments.
(95016) Kimjeongho = 2002 AA9
Discovered 2002 Jan. 9 by Y.-B. Jeon at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory.
Kim Jeongho (1804-1866) was a great geographer and a cartographer in the early nineteenth century whose works represented a culmination in Korea's map-making history. The publication of three maps and three topographies is his greatest achievements.
(95593) Azusienis = 2002 FU10
Discovered 2002 Mar. 16 by K. Cernis and J. Zdanavicius at the Moletai Astronomical Observatory
Algimantas Azusienis (b. 1930), a teacher for 50 years at the Vilnius Pedagogical University, has investigated the variable stars and the photometric systems. With V. Straizys he improved the determination of the response curves and parameters of the {\it UBV} system.
(95802) Francismuir = 2003 FM42
Discovered 2003 Mar. 31 by J. Dellinger at Needville.
Francis Muir (b. 1926), mentor and advisor of the discoverer, has demonstrated a deft touch over seemingly endless years of applying a variety of modern mathematical notions to the simple and practical solution of problems in the earth sciences.
(96192) Calgary = 1991 TZ15
Discovered 1991 Oct. 6 by A. Lowe on images taken at Palomar.
Calgary is the largest city in the province of Alberta. It was founded in 1875 as a post of the North West Mounted Police and was incorporated as a city in 1894. Calgary's rapid economic growth is due largely to the petroleum industry, agriculture and tourism.
(96193) Edmonton = 1991 TG16
Discovered 1991 Oct. 6 by A. Lowe on images taken at Palomar.
Edmonton is the capital city of the province of Alberta. It was founded in 1795 as a trading post and celebrated the centennial of its incorporation as a city in 2004. Edmonton is well-known as a cultural, government and educational center.
(96623) Leani = 1999 ET4
Discovered 1999 Mar. 14 by M. M. M. Santangelo at Monte Agliale Astronomical Observatory.
Achille Leani (b. 1924) was one of the founders of the International Union of Amateur Astronomers. Formerly a teacher, he was also a council member of the Societ\`a Astronomica Italiana. He founded the Cremona and Soresina observatories, as well as the Gruppo Astrofili Cremonesi.
(98494) Marsupilami = 2000 UN111
Discovered 2000 Oct. 27 by J.-C. Merlin at Le Creusot.
Named for the comic-strip character created by the Belgian cartoonist Andr\'e Franquin (1924-1997). A playful, gluttonous wag, the Marsupilami first appeared in Jan.\ 1952 in {\it Spirou and Fantasio} magazine, where it shouted out its first ``Houba!
(99262) Bleustein = 2001 OQ12
Discovered 2001 July 20 by J.-C. Merlin at Le Creusot.
Marcel Bleustein-Blanchet (1906-1996) established the Foundation of the Vocation in 1960. The foundation provides financial help for young people who devote their lives to a vocation in various domains (arts, literature, medicine, sciences, etc.). The discoverer was a laureate of this foundation in 1982.
(99861) Tscharnuter = 2002 OV24
Discovered 2002 July 29 by S. F. H\"onig on NEAT images taken at Palomar.
Werner M. Tscharnuter (b. 1945) has made major contributions to the fields of star formation, protoplanetary disks, stellar dynamics and Saturn's rings. He also has an interest in celestial mechanics, particularly with regard to the evolution of the Koronis family, to which this minor planet probably belongs.
(99906) Uofalberta = 2002 QV53
Discovered 2002 Aug. 17 by A. Lowe on images taken at Palomar.
The University of Alberta was founded in 1908 in Edmonton and is one of the leading research institutions in Canada. The initials of its motto {\it Quaecumque Vera} (``Whatsoever things are true'') appropriately appear in the provisional designation for this minor planet.

July 21, 2005 contents[edit]

(5368) Vitagliano = 1984 SW5
Discovered 1984 Sept. 21 by H. Debehogne at the European Southern Observatory.
Aldo Vitagliano (b. 1948), of the University of Naples, wrote the software program "Solex" based on personal simplifications of methods of celestial mechanics. This software allows high accuracy in computing ephemerides of solar-system bodies, including minor planets. The name was suggested by J. Meeus.
(5589) Demeis = 1990 SD14
Discovered 1990 Sept. 23 by H. Debehogne at the European Southern Observatory.
Salvatore De Meis (b. 1930), of Milan, is engaged in the application of astronomical calculations to the dating of historical events, particularly of Babylonian astronomy. The name was suggested by J. Meeus.
(6538) Muraviov = 1981 SA5
Discovered 1981 Sept. 25 by L. I. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Mikhail Nikitich Muraviov (1757-1807), a representative of an old Russian gentry family, was well known as a poet and a literary man. He was an assistant minister of education and an administrator of Moscow State University, where he inaugurated the department of astronomy and built the observatory.
(6619) Kolya = 1973 SS4
Discovered 1973 Sept. 27 by L. I. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Nikolaj Stepanovich Chernykh (1931-2004) was chief, beginning in 1965, of the CrAO-ITA group of observers of minor planets. He himself discovered 536 minor planets and two comets, and he participated in astronomical observations of distant spacecraft and laser ranging of the moon.
(6890) Savinykh = 1975 RP
Discovered 1975 Sept. 3 by L. I. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Victor Petrovich Savinykh (b. 1940), a first-class pilot-cosmonaut, was on board the Salyut 6, Salyut 7 and Mir stations. He is a professor and head of the Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography, as well as the author of many textbooks, monographs and popular books on science.
(7158) IRTF = 1981 ES8
Discovered 1981 Mar. 1 by S. J. Bus at Siding Spring in the course of the U.K.\ Schmidt-Caltech Asteroid Survey.
The 3-meter NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) began operation on Mauna Kea in 1979. The IRTF provides valuable ground-based observations that support NASA planetary missions and basic solar system research, including extensive studies of minor planets and comets.
(7159) Bobjoseph = 1981 EN17
Discovered 1981 Mar. 1 by S. J. Bus at Siding Spring in the course of the U.K. Schmidt-Caltech Asteroid Survey.
Robert D. Joseph (b. 1939), a professor of astronomy at the University of Hawaii, is an expert in infrared studies of extragalactic star formation. From 1989 to 2000, he served as division chief for the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea.
(7160) Tokunaga = 1981 UQ29
Discovered 1981 Oct. 24 by S. J. Bus at Palomar.
University of Hawaii astronomer Alan T. Tokunaga (b. 1949) specializes in studies of star formation and solar system astronomy and in the development of infrared instrumentation. Since Apr.\ 2000 he has served as division chief for the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea.
(7457) Veselov = 1982 SL6
Discovered 1982 Sept. 16 by L. I. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Vyacheslav Afanasievich Veselov (b. 1930), consultant on the automatic "lunokhods", made the small-site photolocation systems for driving the Mars Rover and planet rovers. He directed the performance of the astrophysical devices aboard the Mir station for research on the fine structure of the earth's atmosphere.
(9733) Valtikhonov = 1985 SC3
Discovered 1985 Sept. 19 by N. S. Chernykh and L. I. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
At the Russian Mission Control Center, Valentin Fedorovich Tikhonov (1938-2004) took an active part in realization of many deep space missions. He also developed a relativistic theory of the inner planets, as well as new theories of the motions of comet 1P/Halley and the satellites of Mars.
(9986) Hirokun = 1996 NX
Discovered 1996 July 12 by Y. Shimizu and T. Urata at Nachi-Katsuura.
Hirokun is a nickname for Hiroshi Fukazawa, who was the fianc\'e of Mizuho Urata (1972-2004), daughter of the second discoverer.
(10719) Andamar = 1985 TW
Discovered 1985 Oct. 15 by E. Bowell at the Lowell Observatory's Anderson Mesa Station.
Anne M. (b. 1944) and David (b. 1953) Marren are long-standing friends of the discoverer.
(11788) Nauchnyj = 1977 QN2
Discovered 1977 Aug. 21 by N. S. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
The birth of the settlement of Nauchnyj coincides with the construction of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in central Crimea in 1945. The contributions of the observatory to the world of astrophysics are well known, and the name is being proposed on the occasion of the community's sixtieth anniversary.
(12395) Richnelson = 1995 CD2
Discovered 1995 Feb. 8 by D. J. Asher at Siding Spring.
Richard Nelson (b. 1966) is well known for his work in developing computer simulations for $n$-body systems and applying these to planet formation, both in our solar system and in other systems.
(12975) Efremov = 1973 SY5
Discovered 1973 Sept. 28 by N. S. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Yurij Nikolaevich Efremov (b. 1937) is a leading research scientist at the Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow University. His works on variable stars and star-formation regions are well known. He discovered the period-age relationship for cepheids and created the concept of large complexes of young stars.
(13220) Kashiwagura = 1997 NG3
Discovered 1997 July 1 by T. Okuni at Nanyo.
Mitsuru Kashiwagura (b. 1950), a high school teacher in Ooe, Yamagata prefecture, has been observing occultations since 1994.
(13520) F\'elicienrops = 1990 VC6
Discovered 1990 Nov. 15 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
F\'elicien Rops (1833-1898) was a Belgian painter who rejected the traditional teaching of drawing and painting. Leading with his work {\it Symbolism} at the decadent {\it fin de si\`ecle} and unclassifiable as an artist, his favorite themes were women ({\it Les deux amies}), eroticism and social satire ({\it Un enterrement au pays wallon}).
(13583) Bosret = 1993 TN18
Discovered 1993 Oct. 9 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
Nicolas Bosret (1799-1876) was a blind composer and organist at the Cathedral St.\ Loup in Namur. In 1851 he composed {\it Li Bia Bouqu\`et}, which became the official hymn of the city.
(13772) Livius = 1998 SV163
Discovered 1998 Sept. 18 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory.
The Roman historian Titus Livius (Livy, 59 B.C.--A.D.\ 17) is well known for the 142 books of his {\it Ab urbe condita} (``From the Founding of the City). Only Books 1--10 and 21--45 have survived. The famous defeat by Hannibal of the Roman forces under Flaminius at the battle of Trasimeno Lake is described in Book 22.
(13920) Montecorvino = 1985 PE1
Discovered 1985 Aug. 15 by E. Bowell at the Lowell Observatory's Anderson Mesa Station.
Montecorvino Rovella is a small Italian town east of Salerno, Campania. Regionally known as the ``town of astronomy, it boasts an important amateur astronomical observatory named in honor of Montecorvino's citizen Gian Camillo Gloriosi (1572-1643). The citation is endorsed by A. W. Harris and V. Zappal\`a.
(13921) Sgarbini = 1985 RP
Discovered 1985 Sept. 14 by E. Bowell at the Lowell Observatory's Anderson Mesa Station.
Bruno Sgarbini (b. 1957) directs the ``G. C. Gloriosi amateur astronomical observatory in Montecorvino Rovella, Campania. An ardent popularizer of astronomy, he is also the principal organizer of an annual international astronomy meeting. The citation is endorsed by A. W. Harris and V. Zappal\`a.
(14322) Shakura = 1978 YM
Discovered 1978 Dec. 22 by N. S. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory.
Nikolai Ivanovich Shakura (b. 1945) is the head of the relativistic astrophysics department at the Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow University. A well-known specialist in theory of accretion and in astrophysics of x-ray binaries, he is particularly famous as the developer of the standard theory of disk accretion.
(14499) Satotoshio = 1995 VR1
Discovered 1995 Nov. 15 by K. Endate and K. Watanabe at Kitami.
Toshio Sato (b. 1936) is an amateur astronomer and well known as an expert on the modern history of Japanese astronomy.
(15834) McBride = 1995 CT1
Discovered 1995 Feb. 4 by D. J. Asher at Siding Spring.
Neil McBride (b. 1966) has worked on many aspects of solar system dynamics, including meteor stream formation, interrelations between minor planets, comets and meteors, as well as the structure of the transneptunian region.
(16198) B\'uzios = 2000 AB243
Discovered 2000 Jan. 7 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
The city of Arma\c{c}\~ao dos B\'uzios, Rio de Janeiro, is host to the Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2005 meeting. B\'uzios is known for its magnificent beaches and crystal-clear water that contrast with the exuberantly sculptured landscape and exotic vegetation.
(16231) Jessberger = 2000 ES130
Discovered 2000 Mar. 11 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Elmar K. Jessberger (b. 1943) is professor of experimental and analytical planetology and director of the Institute for Planetology at the Westf\"alischen Wilhelms-University in M\"unster. He is renowned for his work on lunar and meteorite chronology and microanalysis of cosmic dust.
(16243) Rosenbauer = 2000 GO147
Discovered 2000 Apr. 4 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Helmut Rosenbauer (b. 1936) was director of the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy in Katlenburg-Lindau. He was a leader in promoting the Philae lander on the Rosetta spacecraft to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosenbauer is PI of the COSAC instrument, designed to measure the comet's surface chemistry.
(16244) Bro\v{z} = 2000 GQ147
Discovered 2000 Apr. 4 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Miroslav Bro\v{z} (b. 1975) is a celestial mechanician at Charles University, Prague. Bro\v{z} specializes in numerical methods and the Yarkovsky effect, and he also teaches at The Observatory and Planetarium Hradec Kr\'alov\'e.
(16250) Delb\'o = 2000 HP26
Discovered 2000 Apr. 26 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Marco Delb\'o (b. 1972) has contributed significantly to knowledge of the physical properties of near-earth asteroids by means of thermal-infrared observations and modeling. He has derived an estimate of the thermal inertia of near-earth asteroids, which is vital for reliable calculations of orbital drift due to the Yarkovsky effect.
(16255) Hampton = 2000 HX63
Discovered 2000 Apr. 26 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Donald L. Hampton (b. 1963), an atmospheric physicist at Ball Aerospace and Technology, has served as the system engineer for all the scientific instruments on the Deep Impact mission.
(16280) Groussin = 2000 LS6
Discovered 2000 June 1 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Olivier Groussin (b. 1976), a planetary scientist at the University of Maryland, played a major role in the calibration of the visible-light instruments on the Deep Impact mission, and he also developed models for interpreting the results from the infrared spectrometer.
(16946) Farnham = 1998 HJ51
Discovered 1998 Apr. 25 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Tony L. Farnham (b. 1964), an astronomer at the University of Maryland, has studied the dynamics of cometary dust and determined comet rotation states. He has also contributed to the Deep Impact mission by improving the standardization of filter photometry.
(16952) Peteschultz = 1998 KX3
Discovered 1998 May 22 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Peter H. Schultz (b. 1944), a geologist at Brown University, has studied cratering phenomena experimentally and in the field. He has played a major role in defining and developing the Deep Impact mission, particularly through his cratering experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range.
(16958) Klaasen = 1998 PF
Discovered 1998 Aug. 2 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Kenneth P. Klaasen (b. 1946), a geomorphologist and expert in scientific operations of spacecraft at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has designed observational sequences for numerous planetary missions, most recently for Deep Impact, for which he has also overseen instrument calibration.
(16975) Delamere = 1998 YX29
Discovered 1998 Dec. 27 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
W. Alan Delamere (b. 1935), recently retired from Ball Aerospace and Technology, has made major contributions to cometary science, ranging from management of the Halley multicolor camera on the Giotto mission to his insightful approach to the original design of the Deep Impact mission.
(16986) Archivestef = 1999 AR34
Discovered 1999 Jan. 15 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Stephanie McLaughlin (b. 1961) has worked at the University of Maryland both for the Small Bodies Node of the Planetary Data System and for the Deep Impact project, contributing to ground testing of scientific instruments and preparation of the complete scientific archive.
(17022) Huisjen = 1999 DN7
Discovered 1999 Feb. 18 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Martin A. Huisjen (b. 1944) was the manager at Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation for the development of all the scientific instruments on the Deep Impact spacecraft. His technical and programmatic contributions include identifying alternative readout modes for the detector in the near-infrared spectrometer.
(17034) Vasylshev = 1999 FS9
Discovered 1999 Mar. 22 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Vasyl G. Shevchenko (b. 1960), of the Institute of Astronomy, Kharkiv National University, is the most productive observer of the magnitude-phase dependence and opposition effect for minor planets. He was one of the first to show that the amplitude of the opposition effect depends on taxonomic class.
(17035) Velichko = 1999 FC10
Discovered 1999 Mar. 22 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Fedor P. Velichko (b. 1957) is a senior scientist at the Institute of Astronomy, Kharkiv National University, and director of Chuguev Observing Station. He is an expert on the photometry and polarimetry of minor planets and comets.
(17036) Krugly = 1999 FD10
Discovered 1999 Mar. 22 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Yurij N. Krugly (b. 1962), of the Institute of Astronomy, Kharkiv National University, is an unsurpassed observer of minor planets. He carried out photometric observation of more than 100 near-earth asteroids, and, together with P. Pravec, discovered and investigated several binary systems.
(17060) Mikecombi = 1999 GX7
Discovered 1999 Apr. 9 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Michael R. Combi (b. 1962), of the University of Michigan, is a planetary astronomer who specializes in the detailed modeling of cometary comae. His model for the distribution of water molecules and associated byproducts has been invaluable in understanding a wide variety of coma observations.
(17061) Tegler = 1999 GQ8
Discovered 1999 Apr. 10 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Stephen C. Tegler (b. 1962), of Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, is a planetary astronomer who has studied the chemical composition of comets and the physical properties of Kuiper Belt Objects. His KBO colorimetry implies a correlation with dynamical class.
(17062) Bardot = 1999 GR8
Discovered 1999 Apr. 10 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Brigitte Bardot (b. 1934) is a French movie star and a leading spokesperson for animal rights.
(17063) Papaloizou = 1999 GP9
Discovered 1999 Apr. 15 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
John C. B. Papaloizou (b. 1947), of Queen Mary College, University of London, has worked on the theory of accretion disks, with particular application to the formation of planets.
(17075) Pankonin = 1999 GF49
Discovered 1999 Apr. 9 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Vernon Pankonin (b. 1946), program director for planetary astronomy at the National Science Foundation, is a radio astronomer by training.
(17179) Codina = 1999 TC224
Discovered 1999 Oct. 4 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Sayd Jose Codina Landaberry (b. 1926) directed the Observatorio Nacional in Rio de Janeiro from 1991 to 1999. Codina is well known in the field of astrophysical observation and instrumentation. Born in Uruguay, since the 1970s he has helped train generations of new astronomers.
(17195) Jimrichardson = 1999 XQ234
Discovered 1999 Dec. 3 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
James Richardson (b. 1961) has calculated models of the shaking of asteroids by impacts for his thesis research at the University of Arizona. As a side venture, he has provided simulation tools for reproducing the phenomenology seen by the Deep Impact mission, and these have been invaluable in planning observing sequences.
(17196) Mastrodemos = 1999 XW234
Discovered 1999 Dec. 3 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Nickolaos Mastrodemos (b. 1964), a member of the navigation group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was a key figure in the development of autonavigation on the Deep Impact mission, as well as on earlier missions to comets. He developed the targeting algorithms and carried out the testing via numerous simulations.
(17215) Slivan = 2000 AG238
Discovered 2000 Jan. 6 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Stephen M. Slivan (b. 1962) demonstrated a preferential spin-vector alignment among Koronis family members. Known as "Slivan states", the discovery has led to a new understanding of thermal radiation forces on small bodies.
(17216) Scottstuart = 2000 AK243
Discovered 2000 Jan. 7 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Joseph Scott Stuart (b. 1971) derived a bias-corrected diameter distribution of the near-earth-asteroid population through a combination of discovery statistics and spectroscopic and albedo properties. He has also developed moving-object detection software for LINEAR.
(17241) Wooden = 2000 EM126
Discovered 2000 Mar. 11 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Diane H. Wooden (b. 1958), of NASA Ames Research Center, has helped pioneer the use of thermal infrared spectroscopy to characterize the mineralogical composition of dust. This has resulted in the discovery of both crystalline and amorphous silicate features in comets.
(17242) Leslieyoung = 2000 EX130
Discovered 2000 Mar. 11 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Leslie A. Young (b. 1965), of the Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado, uses occultation and near infrared techniques to study outer-planet atmospheres.
(17249) Eliotyoung = 2000 GM110
Discovered 2000 Apr. 2 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Eliot F. Young (b. 1962), of the Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado, studies volatile transport on outer-solar-system bodies. He has used the mutual events between Pluto and Pluto I (Charon) to determine their radii and to derive albedo and color maps of Pluto.
(17257) Strazzulla = 2000 HM25
Discovered 2000 Apr. 26 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Giovanni (``Gianni) Strazzulla (b. 1951) is senior astronomer at the Experimental Astrophysics Laboratory of Catania Astrophysical Observatory. He is involved in the experimental study of the effects induced by fast ions and ultraviolet Lyman-$\alpha$ photons in solids of astrophysical and planetary interest.
(17278) Viggh = 2000 LK27
Discovered 2000 June 6 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Herbert E. M. Viggh (b. 1963), of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory, was responsible for software development, computer systems and data analysis of the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) program, the world's most prolific discovery program for minor planets to date.
(17279) Jeniferevans = 2000 LX27
Discovered 2000 June 6 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Jenifer B. Evans (b. 1964), of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory, has served as principal manager for the LINEAR program.
(17280) Shelly = 2000 LK28
Discovered 2000 June 6 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Frank C. Shelly (b. 1960) has been a developer of software for moving objects and was worked as the LINEAR site operations coordinator in Socorro, New Mexico.
(17281) Mattblythe = 2000 LV28
Discovered 2000 June 6 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Matthew S. Blythe (b. 1960) is a lead site observer at Socorro, New Mexico, for the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research program.
(17807) Ericpearce = 1998 FT74
Discovered 1998 Mar. 19 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Eric C. Pearce (b. 1961) is the site manager at Socorro, New Mexico, for LINEAR.
(17836) Canup = 1998 HT50
Discovered 1998 Apr. 25 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Robin M. Canup (b. 1968), of Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado, has greatly advanced our understanding of the moon's origin and subsequent dynamical evolution.
(17853) Ronaldsayer = 1998 JK3
Discovered 1998 May 1 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Ronald W. Sayer (b. 1967), of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory, is a data analyst for the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research program.
(17856) Gomes = 1998 KL1
Discovered 1998 May 18 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Rodney Gomes da Silva (b. 1954) has produced a series of seminal works on the dynamics of minor planets, primordial sculpting of the Kuiper Belt, and the migration of planets in planetesimal disks, as well as on the origin of the late heavy bombardment of the terrestrial planets.
(17857) Hsieh = 1998 KR1
Discovered 1998 May 18 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Henry H. Hsieh (b. 1978) has studied the nature of the comet-like Themis-family minor planet (7968) = 133P/Elst-Pizarro and has surveyed the main belt for examples of similar transition objects.
(17858) Beaug\'e = 1998 KS3
Discovered 1998 May 22 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Cristian Beaug\'e (b. 1963), of the Observatorio Astron\'omico, Universidad Nacional de C\'ordoba, has shown the possibility of asymmetric resonant orbits in resonance with Neptune, and he has contributed to the computation of proper elements for Jupiter Trojans.
(17859) Galinaryabova = 1998 KC4
Discovered 1998 May 22 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Galina O. Ryabova (b. 1955), of Tomsk State University, has generated mathematical models to simulate the evolution of meteoroid streams and for predicting their behavior near the earth.
(17860) Roig = 1998 KQ4
Discovered 1998 May 22 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Fernando Roig (b. 1968), of the Observat\'orio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, is known for his results on the depletion of the Hecuba gap and as co-author of a method for computing proper elements for Jupiter Trojans.
(17897) Gallardo = 1999 FV8
Discovered 1999 Mar. 19 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Tabar\'e Gallardo (b. 1962) is a dynamicist at the astronomy department of the University of the Republic, Montevideo. He works on the dynamics of minor bodies, transneptunian objects and extrasolar planets.
(17898) Scottsheppard = 1999 FB19
Discovered 1999 Mar. 22 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Scott Sheppard (b. 1977) has pioneered the investigation of the rotational properties of Kuiper Belt Objects, and he has discovered many irregular satellites of the giant planets.
(17899) Mariacristina = 1999 FD19
Discovered 1999 Mar. 22 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Maria Cristina De Sanctis (b. 1967), of the Instituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Rome, models the physical properties of cometary nuclei. She is a participant in several space missions to small solar-system bodies.
(17919) Licandro = 1999 GC8
Discovered 1999 Apr. 9 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Javier Licandro (b. 1966), a Uruguayan astronomer at the Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma, works on the physical properties of minor bodies and transneptunian objects.
(17920) Zarnecki = 1999 GE9
Discovered 1999 Apr. 10 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
John C. Zarnecki (b. 1949), of the Open University, Milton Keynes, has developed spacecraft instrumentation to study the surfaces and atmospheres of planets, satellites and small bodies. He is a PI for the Huygens probe/lander on the Cassini mission to Saturn and Saturn VI (Titan).
(18079) Lion-Stoppato = 2000 FJ63
Discovered 2000 Mar. 27 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Piero Francesco Lion-Stoppato (b. 1969), of the University of Padua, participated in the initial phases of the Cassini/Huygens cruise and managed the spear model for simulating flight commands. He is helping analyze data collected during the Huygens probe entry and descent into the atmosphere of Saturn VI (Titan).
(18099) Flamini = 2000 LD27
Discovered 2000 June 6 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Enrico Flamini (b. 1951), of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), is co-investigator of the Huygens Atmospheric structure instrument and ASI manager of the entire Cassini/Huygens mission.
(18100) Lebreton = 2000 LE28
Discovered 2000 June 6 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Jean-Pierre Lebreton (b. 1949), of the ESA/ESTEC Space Science Department, is project scientist for the Huygens probe.
(18101) Coustenis = 2000 LF32
Discovered 2000 June 5 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Athena Coustenis (b. 1961), of the Laboratoire d'études spatiales et d'instrumentation en astrophysique at Paris Observatory, has studied Saturn VI (Titan) telescopically by analyzing Voyager spacecraft data. She is co-investigator of three Cassini/Huygens mission instruments.
(18102) Angrilli = 2000 LN34
Discovered 2000 June 3 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Francesco Angrilli (b. 1937), of the University of Padua, is a pioneer in research on tethered satellites. He is project manager and co-investigator of the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument.
(18106) Blume = 2000 NX3
Discovered 2000 July 4 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
William H. Blume (b. 1948), a senior mission designer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has played a key role in the development of the Deep Impact mission to comet 9P/Tempel.
(18110) HASI = 2000 NK13
Discovered 2000 July 5 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
This minor planet is named to honor the 44 members of the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument team.
(18111) Pinet = 2000 NB14
Discovered 2000 July 5 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Patrick Pinet (b. 1957), of the Observatoire de Midi-Pyren\'ees, Toulouse, is an expert on the physical and compositional properties of the moon and terrestrial planets. He has taken part in several lunar and Mars space missions.
(18112) Jeanlucjosset = 2000 NX17
Discovered 2000 July 5 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Jean-Luc Josset (b. 1959) directs the Space Exploration Institute in Neuch\^atel. Active in planetary and exobiological research, Josset has designed and developed space instrumentation, particularly ultra-miniaturized cameras. He is PI of the Advanced Micro-Imager Experiment aboard the SMART-1 spacecraft.
(18113) Bibring = 2000 NC19
Discovered 2000 July 5 by the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at the Anderson Mesa Station.
Jean-Pierre Bibring (b. 1948), of the Universit\'e de Paris Sud--Paris 11, has helped develop the French planetary science community. He has participated in a number of space missions, including Phobos, Mars Express and Rosetta.
(21328) Otashi = 1997 AM13
Discovered 1997 Jan. 11 by T. Kobayashi at Oizumi.
In Mar.\ 2005 Ota city and three neighboring towns in the eastern part of Gunma prefecture were combined to form a new Ota city. Astronomical outreach is energetically carried out there by the Ota Uchuno Kai (Ota Astronomical Club).
(23999) Rinner = 1999 RA33
Discovered 1999 Sept. 9 by L. Bernasconi at St. Michel sur Meurthe.
Claudine Rinner (b. 1965) is a very active French amateur astronomer. She works in Ottmarsheim on a survey for detecting minor planets. She also makes light-curve observations for determining their rotational periods.
(24000) Patrickdufour = 1999 RB33
Discovered 1999 Sept. 10 by L. Bernasconi at St. Michel sur Meurthe.
Patrick Dufour (b. 1968), a very active French amateur astronomer, has developed many useful tools and programs for astronomy. He is working with the discoverer on robotic materials for astronomical purposes.
(26500) Toshiohino = 2000 CC2
Discovered 2000 Feb. 2 by T. Kobayashi at Oizumi.
Toshio Hino (b. 1950) is a Japanese astronomer. As chairman of Ota Uchuno Kai, he has played an active part in managing this astronomical club, collaborating with regional astronomical communities and promoting astronomical outreach activities.
(29053) Muskau = 4466 T-2
Discovered 1973 Sept. 30 by C. J. van Houten and I. van Houten-Groeneveld on Palomar Schmidt plates taken by T. Gehrels.
The landscaped park at Muskau sits astride the Neisse river on the border between Poland and Germany near Bad Muskau.
(32724) Woerlitz = 4029 T-3
Discovered 1977 Oct. 16 by C. J. van Houten and I. van Houten-Groeneveld on Palomar Schmidt plates taken by T. Gehrels.
The park at Woerlitz, near Dessau, is an exceptional German example of eighteenth-century landscape design.
(35461) Mazzucato = 1998 DM23
Discovered 1998 Feb. 26 by L. Tesi and A. Boattini at San Marcello Pistoiese.
Michele T. Mazzucato (b. 1962) is an amateur astronomer whose main fields of interest are the history of astronomy, geometrical geodesy and astrometry of minor planets. A member of several scientific associations, he has written many articles and books, principally on geodesy and astronomy topics.
(36446) Cinodapistoia = 2000 QV
Discovered 2000 Aug. 22 by L. Tesi and A. Boattini at San Marcello Pistoiese.
Cino da Pistoia (1270-1337), whose full name was Guittoncino dei Sinibaldi (or Sighibuldi), was a Tuscan jurist and poet. A friend of Dante Alighieri and Francesco Petrarch, he wrote treatises on jurisprudence as well as numerous lyrics and sonnets dealing with the psychology of love.
(36800) Katarinawitt = 2000 SF45
Discovered 2000 Sept. 28 by J. Kandler at Volkssternwarte Drebach.
Katarina Witt (b. 1965) is a world-famous German figure skater. She was Olympic Champion in Sarajevo (1984) and in Calgary (1988) and four-time World Figure Skating Champion. In 1999, she was elected "Ice Skater of the Century" in Germany.
(38976) Taeve = 2000 UR
Discovered 2000 Oct. 21 by G. Lehmann at Volkssternwarte Drebach.
Gustav Adolf Schur (b. 1931), better known as Taeve, is one of the most popular German cyclists. He won the Peace Race (a cycling event held in Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic) in 1955 and 1959 and became Road-Cycling World Champion in Reims (1958) and Zandvoort (1959).
(39405) Mosigkau = 1063 T-1
Discovered 1971 Mar. 25 by C. J. van Houten and I. Van Houten-Groeneveld on Palomar Schmidt plates taken by T. Gehrels.
The castle at Mosigkau near Dessau, with its garden, is a relic of the Rococo period in Germany. It was built for a princess of Anhalt.
(43931) Yoshimi = 1996 PR9
Discovered 1996 Aug. 9 by T. Okuni at Nanyo.
Yoshimi Takahashi (1925-2005) was an amateur astronomer who contributed much to the establishment of Nanyo Astronomical Lovers Club in 1983 and the Nanyo Citizen's Astronomical Observatory in 1987.
(45500) Motegi = 2000 BN3
Discovered 2000 Jan. 27 by T. Kobayashi at Oizumi.
Japanese amateur astronomer Hiromitsu Motegi (b. 1960) has a particular interest in digital imaging. As an instructor at many meetings of observers, he has shared his knowledge with others, particularly children. He also collaborates with amateur astronomers through his web site.
(55477) Soroban = 2001 UC1
Discovered 2001 Oct. 18 by H. Maeno at Shishikui.
The soroban, or abacus, is an important tool of Japanese culture, used to calculate and record numbers. It has been used in Japan since 1624.
(59001) Senftenberg = 1998 SZ35
Discovered 1998 Sept. 26 by J. Ticha and M. Tichy at Klet.
Senftenberg (now \v{Z}amberk) is where two comets were discovered by Theodor Brorsen in 1851. It is a pleasant market-town located at the foot of the Orlick\'e mountains in eastern Bohemia. It is the birthplace of Prokop Divi\v{s}, astronomer August Seydler and surgeon Eduard Albert.
(66934) K\'alalov\'a = 1999 WF1
Discovered 1999 Nov. 26 by J. Ticha and M. Tichy at Klet.
Vlasta K\'alalov\'a-Di Lotti (1896-1971), a Czech physician interested in tropical diseases and entomology, came from the southern Bohemian town of Bernartice. In 1925, she founded a hospital in Baghdad (Mustausaf Cechoslovak), with a special focus on health services for women.
(70745) Aleserpieri = 1999 VZ20
Discovered 1999 Nov. 9 by V. Goretti at Pianoro.
Italian scientist Alessandro Serpieri (1823-1885) was a teacher of mathematics and physics. As an astronomer, he determined the Perseid radiant and studied the solar eclipse of 1870 Dec. 22. He also analyzed the Italian earthquakes of 1872 and 1875.
(73465) Buonanno = 2002 NP55
Discovered 2002 July 10 by the Campo Imperatore Near Earth Object Survey.
Roberto Buonanno (b. 1947) is an expert in stellar evolution and director of the Osservatorio Astron{o}mico di Roma. He created the Planetary Sciences team at the OAR and supported research programs devoted to near-earth objects and to the study of the physical properties of the small bodies of the solar system.
(73640) Biermann = 1977 RM
Discovered 1977 Sept. 5 by H.-E. Schuster at the European Southern Observatory.
Ludwig Biermann (1907-1986) was the first director of the Max-Planck-Institut f\"ur Astrophysik. He made pioneering studies on stellar convection and the solar chromosphere and corona. His 1951 study of the structural changes in the tail of comet C/1942 X1 provided the first evidence of the existence of the solar wind.
(89903) Post = 2002 DL3
Discovered 2002 Feb. 20 by B. L. Stevens at Desert Moon Observatory.
Cecil Post (b. 1917) is an amateur astronomer and former engineer in the antenna section of the physical sciences laboratory in Las Cruces, New Mexico. He was an early and active member of the Astronomical Society of Las Cruces and was a frequent officer, including president, of that organization.
(90414) Karpov = 2003 YP110
Discovered 2003 Dec. 19 by R. Ferrando at Pla D'Arguines.
Anatoly Karpov (b. 1951) learned chess from his father at the age of four and was soon able to beat older players. He was world chess champion from 1975 to 1985 and from 1993 to 1999. He has won more tournaments than any other player in the history of the game.
(96205) Ararat = 1992 ST16
Discovered 1992 Sept. 24 by F. B\"orngen and L. D. Schmadel at Tautenburg.
The majestic Mt.\ Ararat, an extinct volcano with double cone-shaped peaks (altitudes 5165 and 3925 m), has been sung by poets from ancient times to our days. It is the highest mountain of the historical Armenia, now in Turkey. The name was proposed by the first discoverer.
(99942) Apophis = 2004 MN4
Discovered 2004 June 19 by R. A. Tucker, D. J. Tholen and F. Bernardi at Kitt Peak.
Also known as Apep, the Destroyer, Apophis is the Egyptian god of evil and destruction who dwelled in eternal darkness. As a result of its passage within 40~000 km of the earth on 2029 Apr.\ 13, this minor planet will move from the Aten to the Apollo class.

You've probably seen it, but...[edit]

I found this old list of minor planets with unknown names: http://www.astro.uni-bonn.de/~pbrosche/aa/enha/enha09.txt

I'm interested in the Meanings of asteroid names because a number of U.S. Navy ships from the WWII era were named after asteroids, and I'm putting articles about them on Wikipedia. The Navy historical sources didn't know much about asteroids, let alone the meanings of their names. They say things like "the ship was named after a heavenly body." Thanks to Wikipedia, there's now much more information about them. Lou Sander 15:52, 9 August 2006 (UTC)

Questioning 343 Ostara[edit]

The asteroid is named Ostara, and it is said to be named after Eostre. If you follow the links, you will see that there is confusion between those two names -- one is not merely an alternative spelling of the other. I'm thinking that maybe the "named after Eostre" might not be 100% correct. Lou Sander 14:41, 10 August 2006 (UTC)

Let's see what Herget says (I've yet to do asteroids 1 through 500 in the Meanings of asteroid names pages). Page 39: « Early Teutonic Goddess of Spring. The Easter rabbit was the escort of Ostara, who thus contributed the name Easter (German Ostern). (AP; RC) » The "(AP; RC)" bit means the entry was contributed by A. Paluzie-Borrell and R. C. Cameron. Seems the current entry is about right. I'l tweak it. Urhixidur 03:44, 21 April 2007 (UTC)

Asteroids without a name with a small number (<5000)[edit]

Did a list, is this of any interest to anyone ? 88.195.46.112 11:27, 8 July 2007 (UTC)

  1. 3708 - 1974 FV1
  2. 3757 - 1982 XB
  3. 3852 - 1987 DR6
  4. 3950 - 1986 CH
  5. 3988 - 1986 LA
  6. 4034 - 1986 PA -
  7. 4035 - 1986 WD -
  8. 4047 - 1964 TT2
  9. 4123 - 1986 QP1
  10. 4178 - 1988 EO1
  11. 4197 - 1982 TA
  12. 4202 - 1985 CB2
  13. 4225 - 1989 BN
  14. 4245 - 1981 UC10
  15. 4252 - 1985 RG4
  16. 4262 - 1989 CO
  17. 4288 - 1989 TQ1
  18. 4298 - 1941 WA
  19. 4314 - 1979 ML3
  20. 4324 - 1981 YA1
  21. 4329 - 1982 SX2
  22. 4334 - 1983 RO3
  23. 4384 - 1990 AA
  24. 4425 - 1967 UQ
  25. 4436 - 1983 EX
  26. 4443 - 1985 RD4
  27. 4477 - 1983 SB
  28. 4489 - 1988 AK
  29. 4493 - 1988 TG1
  30. 4495 - 1988 VS
  31. 4507 - 1990 FV
  32. 4538 - 1988 TP
  33. 4545 - 1989 SB11
  34. 4555 - 1987 QL
  35. 4576 - 1988 CC
  36. 4596 - 1981 QB
  37. 4604 - 1987 SK
  38. 4627 - 1985 RT2
  39. 4632 - 1987 YB
  40. 4633 - 1988 AJ5
  41. 4641 - 1990 QT3
  42. 4656 - 1978 VZ3
  43. 4662 - 1984 HL
  44. 4663 - 1984 SM1
  45. 4668 - 1987 DX5
  46. 4688 - 1980 WF
  47. 4695 - 1985 RU3
  48. 4697 - 1986 QO
  49. 4715 - 1989 TS1
  50. 4738 - 1985 RZ4
  51. 4744 - 1988 RF5
  52. 4749 - 1989 WE1
  53. 4759 - 1978 VG10
  54. 4772 - 1989 VM
  55. 4784 - 1984 DF1
  56. 4793 - 1988 RR4
  57. 4800 - 1989 TG17
  58. 4817 - 1984 DC1
  59. 4830 - 1988 RG4
  60. 4835 - 1989 BQ
  61. 4858 - 1985 UA
  62. 4864 - 1988 RA5
  63. 4881 - 1975 XJ
  64. 4897 - 1987 QD6
  65. 4901 - 1988 VJ
  66. 4913 - 1965 SO
  67. 4925 - 1981 XH2
  68. 4933 - 1984 EN1
  69. 4937 - 1986 CL1
  70. 4938 - 1986 CQ1
  71. 4939 - 1986 QL1
  72. 4941 - 1986 UA
  73. 4942 - 1987 DU6
  74. 4948 - 1988 VF1
  75. 4949 - 1988 WE
  76. 4953 - 1990 MU
  77. 4984 - 1978 VU10
  78. 4995 - 1984 QR

Requested move[edit]

Since all of these are by definition minor planets, but not necessarily asteroids, we should use the technical term and move this to Meanings of minor-planet names. (Yes, I know the preferred term is now SSSB, but that's not what these lists are about.) JPL sites say that many of these bodies are not really "asteroids", and even people who call Quaoar an asteroid would probably have a hard time doing that with Pluto.

This'll be easier with a bot. Any objections? kwami (talk) 22:30, 3 October 2008 (UTC)

Meanings of minor-planet names should be Meanings of minor planet names, Urhixidur (talk) 16:54, 14 October 2008 (UTC)
Really? So, officially, they're minor names of planets, rather than names of minor planets? I guess it's pretty obvious what it means either way. kwami (talk) 18:41, 14 October 2008 (UTC)

(Discussion was at List of asteroids. kwami (talk) 07:03, 14 October 2008 (UTC))

I finally did it manually. kwami (talk) 06:25, 18 December 2008 (UTC)

Merge subpages[edit]

I noticed that most of the higher sublists (N>100,000) are very short or even empty. Therefore I suggest to merge them into blocks of 10,000s (or even 100,000s??) from 100,000 upwards. E.g. there are only 25 named minor planets in the range 100,001-110,000, so these merged lists would still be much shorter than the subpage for 1-500. --Roentgenium111 (talk) 14:50, 13 February 2009 (UTC)

Okay, I'll start it now.--Roentgenium111 (talk) 16:01, 27 February 2009 (UTC)

What about this: Meanings of minor planet names: 100,001–110,000, or Meanings of minor planet names: 110,001–120,000? Comments are welcome.--Roentgenium111 (talk) 21:55, 1 March 2009 (UTC)

Done.--Roentgenium111 (talk) 16:38, 17 March 2009 (UTC)


Given the sizes of the sublists between 50,000 and 100,000, these could (should, IMO) be merged as well to blocks of 10,000s while staying comfortably below the 100kB limit. (One could even merge in this way from 30,000 onwards, apparently.)--Roentgenium111 (talk) 22:16, 27 May 2010 (UTC)

What if we took all the minor planet names, and moved them into one article? Actually, what is we took all the names of astronomical objects and put it into one page seperated by planets, asteroids, etc — Preceding unsigned comment added by Dragonh4t (talkcontribs) 22:56, 5 March 2012 (UTC)

There's some 16,000 named minor planets, that's too much for a single article. But some 16 sublists would do (~100 kB each), and be preferable to the current >100 subarticles IMO. --Roentgenium111 (talk) 21:22, 22 May 2014 (UTC)