Talk:Member of parliament

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List of British MPs[edit]

How about a List of British MPs? I'm thinking past and present, so it would be a huge list, but we have a list of people after all... Any thoughts? I'd say there should be a master list of all MPs, lists of MPs for each constituency, and lists of MPs by when they were elected (already started by some). Yes, it is a massive project! --Sam 11:43, 12 Jan 2004 (UTC)

It seems the category system would be the best way to create this list. --Sam Francis

I agree there is lots of interesting missing UK history here, let alone elsewhere. What about the history of Women MPs for example? As recently as 1851 the idea was considered humour [1] but when was the first? 1920 or so? How long after women got the vote? --BozMo|talk 11:53, 25 Jan 2005 (UTC)

Non-British MPs[edit]

Aren't the Canadian MP's still MP's...

This article seems not to be complete. Why don't we add Swedisch, Finnish, French,Dutch, etc. MP's. Why can't a MP be elected through proportional representation. I would say that this article doesn't make any sense. Gangulf 12:21, 5 Aug 2004 (UTC)

Feel free to make the necessary additions and changes. --Sam Francis 19:26, 6 Aug 2004 (UTC)

UK MPs Term Limit[edit]

It's not correct, is it, that MPs terms are limited to five years? The length of a parliament is limited to five years, I agree, but if a dissolution wasn't called after five years, MPs would remain MPs? Dupont Circle 18:35, 27 Feb 2005 (UTC)

No, parliament are automatically disolve after 5 years if it's not requested before that. From Parliament of the United Kingdom - Each Parliament, after a number of sessions, comes to an end, either by the command of the Sovereign or by effluxion of time, the former being more common in modern times. ... Originally, there was no fixed limit on the length of a Parliament, but the Triennial Act 1694 set the maximum duration at three years. As the frequent elections were deemed inconvenient, the Septennial Act 1716 extended the maximum duration to seven years, but the Parliament Act 1911 reduced it to five years. During the Second World War, the term was temporarily extended to ten years by Acts of Parliament. Since the end of the war in 1945, however, the maximum term has remained five years. -- KTC 00:14, 16 Apr 2005 (UTC)
An MP's term is limited to five years. There is no limit, however, on how many terms an MP may serve. - Cafemusique 01:19, 16 Apr 2005 (UTC)
So the law doesn't say that MP's term are limited to five years. The law says that parliaments can only last five years and that MPs cease to be MPs when parliament is dissolved or expires Dupont Circle 06:48, 16 Apr 2005 (UTC)

What about India?[edit]

I don't know anything about it but doesn't India have MPs much like the UK does? --Feitclub 22:00, Apr 15, 2005 (UTC)

Addressing an MP[edit]

It would be good to have some information here on how to properly address an MP of a particular parliamentary body in written correspondence. US senators are usually addressed as "Senator such-and-such", representatives as "Congress<man>/<woman>/<person> so-and-so"; I'd like to know how to address an MP. Maybe it's just "Mr/Mrs/Ms"?

That's how it works in my country, yes. Sometimes, in print, they get the letters "MP" added after their names if it's not clear from the context, but they're generally just "Mr. Smith", and so forth. I can't speak for other countries, but I believe it's much the same. -- Vardion 01:37, 4 May 2005 (UTC)
In the Commonwealth of Nations, if they are members of the Privy Council their names are prefixed by The Right Honourable (Rt. Hon.) in formal contexts but that is unrelated to being an MP. In the UK Parliament, MPs address each other as "the (Right) Honourable member (for [constituency])" (without their names), but only The Right Honorable (for privy councillors) as opposed to The Honorable is ever used in front of their names.
Joe Llywelyn Griffith Blakesley talk contrib 23:49, 23 July 2006 (UTC)

Capitalisation of article title[edit]

When used as a title obviously it should be capitalised (e.g.: Joe Bloggs Member of Parliament) but then the acronym is always used. Elsewhere it makes little sense (i.e.: it should be Joe Bloggs is a member of parliament). Even member of Parliament would be just acceptable if it was clear we were talking about a specific parliament (as Parliament could be shorthand for Parliament of ...) but we aren't in this article. The same thing applies to simlar articles like Assembly Member.

Joe Llywelyn Griffith Blakesley talk contrib 00:00, 24 July 2006 (UTC)

Is not the House of Lords PART of the British Parliament?[edit]

My friends in the UK are describing the Wikipedia as "a great work of fiction" based in part on the claim that an MP is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district and that, therefore, members of the House of Lords are not Members of Parliament. I see absolutely NO sources or references in the article for restricting the term MP to the Commons in the UK (There seems to be a little somehting for that in Australia.) Can someone provide an authoritative reference? Pzavon 01:55, 18 October 2006 (UTC)

Well it's undoubtedly the case that some peers are 'members of parliament' but they are not nor have they ever been called either that or MPs. Alci12 20:21, 6 December 2006 (UTC)
That answer rather escapes the point, as the question isn't about peers who are eligible to be elected to the British House of Commons. Members of the House of Lords aren't ever referred to in the UK as members of parliament, although the House of Lords is of course part of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and they are members of it. We could call it an anomoly that somehow over the centuries members of the House of Commons have come to monopolize the description 'member of parliament'. Moonraker2 (talk) 16:51, 25 November 2009 (UTC)

This is obviously speculation, but I would hazard the guess that Commons members would have adopted "MP" in order to make clear that they were Members of Parliament, whereas peers haven't ever needed to do the same - they already had titles, which (until very recently) would have come with a seat in the Lords, so it didn't need to be stated seperately. 86.170.165.125 (talk) 21:58, 28 January 2010 (UTC)

Missing: Parliament of Kenya[edit]

Kenyan Parliament, homepage http://www.bunge.go.ke/parliament/ To be added --RicHard (talk) 14:31, 18 August 2009 (UTC)

Details on UK MP's remuneration to new section?[edit]

I think the topical importance of MP's remuneration means that this section warrants its own entry. I'll look at seeing how this might be done Cloversmate (talk) 22:03, 20 May 2009 (UTC)

Welsh Assembly and Welsh Government[edit]

The subsection on Wales currently starts:

  The Welsh Assembly ... forms the Welsh Assembly Government, which 
  unusually combines legislative and executive functions[citation needed].

I'm no expert on the relationship between Assembly and Government, but this statement seems to contradict what is said on the Assembly's website:

  http://www.assemblywales.org/abthome.htm

where the "The Assembly" section says:

  This section explains ... the difference between the National 
  Assembly for Wales and the Welsh Government ..."

Perhaps somebody who knows the details could rewrite the start of this subsection.

Eebkent (talk) 11:43, 15 July 2009 (UTC)

"The term Member of Parliament is often shortened in the media and in every day use to the initialism 'MP'."[edit]

Despite having lived in the U.S. for some 20-odd years, I saw the term, "MP," to refer a member of parliament for the first time today. It might be a good idea to change this text to something along the lines of, "In many English-speaking parliamentary countries, the term...." It's additionally confusing because the term, "MP," typically refers to military police in the U.S. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 219.121.17.189 (talk) 05:43, 12 July 2010 (UTC)

I don't see a problem with the sentence. It is factually accurate and there is no evidence that usage is limited to within English speaking countries only. There are many acronyms with multiple meanings but we don't constantly have to worry about the alternative meanings. The context of "Member of Parliament is often shortened... to the initialism 'MP'" makes it clear this is not about the US military police. Road Wizard (talk) 09:16, 12 July 2010 (UTC)

Requested move 1[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. Editors desiring to contest the closing decision should consider a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: No consensus, not moved (non-admin closure) DavidLeighEllis (talk) 01:00, 12 April 2014 (UTC)


Member of ParliamentMember of parliament – As the lead explains, the topic is the generic member of parliament, not some proper noun. Dicklyon (talk) 05:22, 4 April 2014 (UTC)

  • Oppose. This is a proper noun; it is a title, which is always capitalised in use. --BrownHairedGirl (talk) • (contribs) 15:38, 11 April 2014 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

Requested move: let's get our facts straight[edit]

In response to BrownHairedGirl:

  • Titles are capitalized when used as titles before names:
    • Governor of New York Nelson Rockefeller
  • Titles are not capitalized when used in other ways:
  • In any country that has a parliament, Parliament is a proper noun, and should be capitalized when referring to a specific parliament.
  • When Member of Parliament is used as a title before a name, it must be capitalized.
  • When it is used in any other way that refers to a specific Parliament, member should not be capitalized in American English. Other varieties of English often do capitalize Member.
    • The New York Times uses member of Parliament in constructions such as
      • he became a member of Parliament
      • a member of Parliament from Britain
      • a Conservative member of Parliament
  • Numerous titles, including doctor, senator, professor, etc., are routinely lowercased when not used as titles.
    • The senator said to the professor, "call a doctor!"

In response to Dicklyon:

  • You are correct that the topic is the generic member of parliament, not some proper noun, and if this discussion were still open, I would Support the requested move ... except that this article is written in British English, where Member of Parliament is routinely used even when not a title before a name.

Anomalocaris (talk) 23:51, 18 April 2014 (UTC)

Even in UK English the generic lowercase version is not uncommon. The caps one is for their own Parliament, natch. Anyway, if you would support, we can try again. I don't know why this one wasn't relisted to get some opinions. Dicklyon (talk) 04:06, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
Indeed. Unless there's some special case, member of parliament should not be upcased, in any variety of English (Oxford and Chicago guides both say minimise capping generally). Nor is there a good argument to upcase parliament alone; in Australia there's one parliament every three years, generally and generically. Tony (talk) 13:34, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
So should I just do another RM, or perhaps question the non-admin close that should have been a re-list at WP:MRV? Dicklyon (talk) 16:15, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
I'll just do another RM. Dicklyon (talk) 16:18, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
UK newspaper usage is mixed. Some papers use "Member of Parliament" (UK) and "member of parliament" (non-UK). Other always use "member of parliament" even for the UK.
The Guardian seems to use member of parliament for the UK and other parliaments:
The Times (London) seems to use Member of Parliament for the UK and "member of parliament" for other parliaments:
The Telegraph seems to use Member of Parliament for the UK and "member of parliament" for other parliaments:
Anomalocaris (talk) 02:27, 21 April 2014 (UTC)

Requested move 2[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. Editors desiring to contest the closing decision should consider a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: moved per request. Favonian (talk) 16:24, 26 April 2014 (UTC)


Member of ParliamentMember of parliament – The previous RM was prematurely closed as the discussion section above shows. There's no good reason to treat parliament as a proper name in this context. Dicklyon (talk) 16:18, 19 April 2014 (UTC)

  • Support as nom. Please review the article to see that the title is not referring to a particular entity, so can't possibly be a proper name. Dicklyon (talk) 16:19, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
  • Support This term in itself is as generic as it comes. capitalisation is very context dependent. There are many parliaments, including the Mother of parliaments. . There are also many members of parliament, like the member of Parliament for Finchley. People often fall into the trap of excess capitalisation, as demonstrated by BHG above, and just asserting it's a proper noun does not make it so. -- Ohc ¡digame! 06:57, 20 April 2014 (UTC)
  • Support – reasons above, and not only mine. Tony (talk) 13:32, 20 April 2014 (UTC)
  • Support for all reasons already listed here, and my research documented under Requested move: let's get our facts straight showing that British English allows member of parliament even for a member of a specific national parliament, let alone the completely generic use. —Anomalocaris (talk) 02:38, 21 April 2014 (UTC)
  • Support I don't see how this can even be considered a proper noun in this case since the article is not about members of a particular parliament. This is different than something like List of House members of the 41st Parliament of Canada because that is not an article about members of one specific parliament not a general article on the subject as this is. It's also the same reason that List of Vice Presidents of the United States is capitalized whereas the general Vice president article is not.--67.70.140.89 (talk) 02:43, 21 April 2014 (UTC)
To add to my argument, since there is evidence that the use of the uppercase term Member of Parliament is not even consistently used when discussing specific parliaments the case for using uppercase in this general article is even weaker than I initially thought.--67.70.140.89 (talk) 03:14, 21 April 2014 (UTC)
  • Support This is about the generic concept of "member of (a) parliament". walk victor falk talk 07:51, 22 April 2014 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.