Talk:Mexican American

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Mexico (Rated B-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Mexico, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Mexico on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject United States / Hispanic and Latino Americans / Mexican-Americans (Rated B-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject United States, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of topics relating to the United States of America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the ongoing discussions.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Hispanic and Latino Americans task force.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Mexican-Americans task force (marked as Top-importance).
 
WikiProject Ethnic groups  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Ethnic groups, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of articles relating to ethnic groups, nationalities, and other cultural identities on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

Terminology "Anglo" Problematic[edit]

The use of the term "Anglo" is problematic. I am suggesting an edit to American or Anglo-American. The term is racially polarizing, and possibly derogatory. The use of the term arises from the need to contrast Spanish and English speakers in the U.S. The problem is that, while Spanish speakers, and persons of Hispanic descent very likely to relate to the term "Latino/a", English speakers, of Caucasian descent or otherwise, of British Isles descent or otherwise, are not at all likely to relate to the term "Anglo". It is a projection outward upon them. While for example, an understanding and usage of terms such as "la cultura hispana/la cultura sajona" (Hispanic culture/"Saxon" (English speaking) culture) has been known since before the era of American colonization in the Spanish speaking world, no such equivilant exists in English. (U.S.) Americans do not consider themselves culturally tied in the same way Latin Americans themselves do to Spain, or as perhaps Latin Americans imagine (U.S.) Americans do.

Furthermore, the term is confusing. Americans may be properly called Americans, or U.S. citizens - and, colloquially, Yankees, however that would be innapropriate historically and problematic in this particular case. The settlers who arrived in the 19th century in Texas, were Americans, largely from the Southern States. They would not have called themselves Anglo, and have never been called Anglo. Using the term Anglo might suggest to some readers that the U.S. citizen settlers to Texas were instead English.

I understand the opposite reasoning. Mexicans (along with 19th century Tejano settlers) are also Americans in one sense, as are all the people of all the nations on the American continent. Spanish speakers today instead use the terms "norteamericano" (North American) or "estadounidense" (United States' citizen), to refer to (U.S.) Americans - using the term "americano" (American) as it is used in the U.S., to refer to U.S. citizesns, only colloquially. Ultimately though, the article is in English, and will follow the established norms of use for that language, even while discussing issues relating to another.

If the need is felt to articulate the complexities surrounding this issue, and the paucity of terminology on the English language side of the equation, I invite fellow contributors to insert material into the article or linked pages. Best wishes! — Preceding unsigned comment added by MattDiClemente (talkcontribs) 10:28, 1 September 2011 (UTC)

Political affiliation[edit]

Not entirely misleading, since there are Mexican-Americans vote in the Republican party. Texas was one example as two-thirds of the state's Latino vote went to incumbent president George W. Bush in 2004. Bush's appeal to Latinos from both personal experiences and the growing political base in his home states, Bush swayed many traditionally Democrat voters of all races and classes. Please this isn't a POV, but a fact you can find in state (Texas) and federal (U.S.) election results. --Mike D 26 20:48, 25 July 2006 (UTC)


My problem with the photo is that Salma Hayek, for example, is not Mexican-American; she's Mexican, born and raised in Mexico. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Tomás E. Burgos. (talkcontribs) 04:10, 31 March 2011 (UTC)

Name[edit]

Would this not be better at Mexican American, in line with for example Chinese American, German American, Indian American, and so on? — Pekinensis 00:15, 15 July 2005 (UTC)

I agree. I'll start moving. — Stevey7788 (talk) 00:53, 16 July 2005 (UTC)
O.K., I'll start putting this into action. {{move}} template attached here. — Stevey7788 (talk) 00:55, 29 July 2005 (UTC)
Support for above reason. --Taejo 11:32, 9 August 2005 (UTC)
I changed the first line to be "Americans of Mexican ancestry" which mirrors the format of such similar articles as Irish American, German American, Chinese American, etc. Saying that a Mexican American is a "citizen and/or resident of the USA" is not only wrong, it is biased in favor of classifying illegal immigrants as Americans due to their residential status. Saying so is not racist; it is a statement of fact. Residence in a particular country does not automatically classify you as a part of that country's national identity. Mirroring this article's name to similar articles' formats is only logical. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Batman428 (talkcontribs) 03:57, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

I've moved the [age. Paul August 04:30, August 15, 2005 (UTC)

This is an encylopedia, not a dictonary (try http://en.wiktionary.org). Just because 'people' use the phrase doesn't mean it is accurate. The Xxxx American usage appears to specify a group of people who have moved from Xxxx to live in America. In the case of Mexico, they already were/are America, it would be more accurate to describe them as 'American Americans'. Markb 13:21, 21 March 2006 (UTC)


That also striked me. It makes no sence. Most Mexicans can either be called Spanish-, or native Americans - or, more oftenly, both. Mexican American is an Oxymoron in that context, since it makes me, as an Unamerican think of citizens of Mexico living in Mexico (In contrast to US-Americans) 84.167.231.27 15:00, 21 December 2006 (UTC)

Arguably Accurate but Doesn't Belong[edit]

I don't see a reason to enumerate illegal immigrants in the first paragraph. While illegal immigrants are a sizable population they are not numerically representative of the whole. The article is a bit non-NPOV and you are perpetuating a stereotype if you leave it this way. The article is about Mexican-Americans, not illegal immigrants.

This is like writing in an article about U.S. Americans: "Of the 300 million Americans, 215 million are obese and an estimated 50 million are ignorant. Most unhealthily obese Americans reside in Florida, South Carolina and Colorado. Of the ignorant Americans, most don't know if Canada resides on the northern border or the southern border. Additionally, in scholastic aptitude tests, most high school freshmen score at a 65 pecentile when measured against their Singaporean, English, Australian and other Anglophone counterparts. Low scores and their gradual decreases are attributed to obesity and lack of exercise, and cultural complacence due to individualistic values."

It's frighteningly accurate, but it doesn't belong in an introductory paragraph. --Deepstratagem 09:52, 29 November 2005 (UTC)

Religion[edit]

Under the culture section, only the arts are highlighted. I would like to see some information on religion as well

Mexican Americans are for one thing, predominantly Roman Catholic as this goes back 500 years, after the Spanish introduced this kind of Christianity into what's now Mexico and Latin America. There's quite a heavy folk segment in Mexican Catholic practices, mainly of Amerindian origin as well localized mythology like the story of the Virgin Mary sightings in Guadalupe, Mexico (1543). Also we need to indicate there are Protestants in the Mexican American community, along with an increase of Spanish-speaking Protestant denominations in the U.S. since 1990. Jews of Spanish origin settled in Mexico (new Spain) since the 1600's and today, only 34,000 estimated Mexican Jews continue to practice Judaism in the country. --Mike D 26 20:58, 25 July 2006 (UTC)

I agree we should put more information on religion. Although not all Mexican Americans are catholic.

Redundancy of term "Mexican American"?[edit]

The section on the redundancy of the term "Mexican American" should probably be removed. The way American is used in Latin America is to mean more or less from the Americas. In the phrase Mexican American, at least in US English, it is used to describe a person of Mexican descent who lives in the US. The term is only redundant in Spanish and Portugese as spoken in Latin America. Theshibboleth 06:41, 30 January 2006 (UTC)

The fact that the term is actually used in the U.S.A. doesn't make the term any less redundant. For example "PIN Number" is widely used but it is still redundant.
--Deepstratagem 06:33, 31 January 2006 (UTC)
_ _ The Shib is right, and the analogy is absurd.
_ _ It is a fact that "number" is part of what PIN abbreviates (though the PIN number article creates a controversy where there is none: all it needs to say is that strictly speaking there is redundancy; any sensible reader knows that that implies some people will draw attention to the fact. (But that is off-topic in that article, bcz drawing attention to it is not about PIN numbers, but about a matter of psychology and sociology -- about what underlies drawing attention to
  • such redundant expressions,
  • the "nucular" and "artic" and "Febuary" pronunciations of the corresponding words,
  • whether it's ever accurate to write a zero in a box that asks for a "number",
  • whether Caucasians should write "white" or "pink" in boxes asking for race, and,
  • oh yes, now i remember, about how concieted it is to write the first person singular pronoun in upper case, as if i were a monarch entitled to violate plain logic in My personal grammar.)
_ _ This is not about a fact of redundancy, but about the fact that some people object to the primary meaning in English of the word "American"; they want to use it only in a way that would make it redundant to use it in the phrase the article is about. The mention in the article is simply hijacking users' attention in order to harangue them about something they are not interested in.
--Jerzyt 05:12, 1 February 2006 (UTC)
I agree with you, Jerzy; the analogy only goes so far. However, since the people who object to the meaning in the U.S. of the word "American" happen to be the people described in the article, and since the redundancy exists as a recognized socio-cultural phenomenon it is more relevant than you make it out to be. --Deepstratagem 06:09, 1 February 2006 (UTC)

Really, do we need to compartmentalize everyone down to the smallest group we can come up with? Mexican American is like saying caucasian white guy. It's that redundant. How about we all be Americans instead of Mexican American, Irish American, African American, Italian American, British American. How come I never hear Canadian American? Why not be unified instead of divided. If you were born in America and reside in America, then you're and American. It's just getting down right rediculous.

I agree, partially. Some people - i.e. born in another country or with parents or parent from another country, can be or clearly are "X-American". However, certainly not everyone with a drop of X ancestry is "X-American", as some Wikipedia editors seem to errnoneously believe. Mad Jack 06:35, 20 October 2006 (UTC)
You really shouldn't blame wiki editors for this. The debate over Mexican-Americans being white Americans has been going on way before wikipedia came along. I suggest you look up LULAC and get more aquainted with this topic since it might be assumed you are cluttering up the talk page. Mosquito-001 13:50, 20 October 2006 (UTC)

Evidence that others consider the term Mexican American redundant and the reasoning behind it. Deepstratagem 21:07, 14 August 2006 (UTC)

Why argue over the definition of the word American? Mexican American is only redundant if the primary definition of American is of or pertaining to North and South America. But if you just look it up you see; A⋅mer⋅i⋅can    /əˈmɛrɪkən/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [uh-mer-i-kuhn] –adjective 1. of or pertaining to the United States of America or its inhabitants: an American citizen. 2. of or pertaining to North or South America; of the Western Hemisphere: the American continents.

So the primary definition of American is pertaining to the USA therefore Mexican American is not redundant. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.176.173.177 (talk) 21:58, 10 March 2009 (UTC)

Bias?[edit]

The Economic issues portion states that Mexican Americans almost exclusively are blue collar workers in places such as California, Texas, Arizona, ect. It seems to draw the conclusion that there are no Mexican Americans in White Collar fields. I find this to be untrue. I hope someone will rewrite the entire paragraph to reflect a more truthful picture.

Also, most of the information tends to lean towards ethnic Mexican and not Mexican Americans. As if to say there is little difference in the cultural, economic and social standing of Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants. There is a difference!

Sgarza 17:17, 10 February 2006 (UTC)

  • Okay. I changed "Economic Issues". It's short and sweet. And more precise. Sgarza
  • Here we go again! Why does this article emphasize Mexican American poverty and not our social mobility? If anything we have the greatest mobility of all! If we emphasize one, it only fair to emphasize the other! Sgarza 16:35, 28 April 2006 (UTC)
Greatest mobility? Add to the article if you can find any sources that confirm this idea.

Another topic that is missing in the article is crime. IIRC, Mexican Americans have crime rates twice the American (USA) average. This is significant and worth adding to the article if proper sources are found and added. Peoplesunionpro 03:38, 6 November 2006 (UTC)


It has been my experince that MOST Mexican Americans are not White Collar. Only until recently have we seen some change in that field. Mexican American's are doing a Cross Over. Remember not too long ago that we got our freedoms. White males were the only ones that could vote. Women didn't even have rights, including white women. It will take some time for the world to change and realize that we do exist, we do have a voice and we will use it.

Latino template[edit]

Please help with the Latino template. --JuanMuslim 1m 18:38, 29 May 2006 (UTC)

Removed edit below is appropriate for articles on Latino and Hispanic people, but not in Mexican American, and Vicente Fox-Quesada is the former president of Mexico relevant to the article. Bachelet and Chile are the other side of the coin, the same coin but let's put this edit on sections dealing with racial categories and what North Americans assume Vicente Fox is "white" or treated like a "Mexican". I mean, he's from Mexico (yes, Mexican) but of mainly European background (in the eyes of some horribly narrow-minded white Americans, he's another white guy in the street). It would be the same for a customs officer examined Michele Bachelet's ethnicity and get confused on whether she's a "Latina" (Chilean) or a Frenchwoman (not Canadian, Ok?).

<< Many prominent "white" Latin Americans who "don't look" like a stereotypical "brown" Latino, for example, Chilean president Michelle Bachelet would be called a "white Anglo" due to her heavy European (French-German-Greek) background, despite she originally came from a Spanish speaking country in South America, not a Mexican. [citation needed] >>

long list of Mexican American communities[edit]

What is the fn value in listing all these cities? danedouard00 07:28, 7 December 2006 (UTC)

I'm inclined to replace the long list with an overlayed map of the US from the census bureau... please discuss danedouard00 06:42, 27 December 2006 (UTC)

im pretty sure that in DC its adams morgan with the high mexican population not just DC its self. im gonna do some research. - signed by anon IP

Go ahead, the Washington DC article might have info. on these matters, most major city articles have sections on featured neighborhoods and how they vary from one another. I believe some of the list of Mexican-American communities are skeptical and not throughly researched, some may be more Puerto Ricans, Guatemalans, Salvadorans, Dominicians and Cubans than Mexicans et al. + 63.3.14.129 06:13, 24 January 2007 (UTC)

Also on the long list they didnt put redwood city, ca (bay area) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.233.206.140 (talk) 20:56, 9 May 2009 (UTC)

The original separate article had a list of them (U.S. cities and counties known for large Mexican populations) but ended up deleted off record. I always believed it could been reedited and reorganized, added more verifiable resources to back up claims (i.e. web sites by the US Census and Mexican-American/Hispanic organizations are good places to start). No similar issues and problems arisen from articles with similar lists for other ethnic groups: List of African American neighborhoods for example. + Mike D 26 (talk) 13:01, 12 May 2009 (UTC)

new material, citations[edit]

this article tends to get a lot of edits that end up in questionable or unsourced material. a lot of it hints at being first hand experience or understanding by the editor, which doesn't really contribute to a good encyclopedia article.

there's already lots of clean-up that's required and i would suggest that new edits be reverted unless they have accompanying citatiosn or summarize already-sourced material. i've already done that with a long series of edits that were done today with no backup. danedouard00 02:41, 24 December 2006 (UTC)

Mexican American vs. illegal Mexican alien[edit]

Folks, we need to keep these terms straight.

I cleaned up the article a little under "Economic and Social issues" but there is more work to be done. According to the very first sentence, Mexican Americans are legitimate US Citizens - not illegal aliens. Therefore the article should not dwell on any perceived plight of the illegal Mexican alien, difficulty finding employers willing to break the law to hire them, illegals receiving or not receiving government benefits, etc.

In addition, articles referring here (such as Santa Ana) probably need to reference illegal immigrant as well.

The "Discrimination and stereotypes" section is poorly written and should probably be removed altogether. --Da Cubs 04:18, 25 December 2006 (UTC)

Agreed. Please remove. I hate reading unencyclopedic junk. Be prepared to get unexplained restores from persons with variable quality standards... they'll make themselves known.danedouard00 05:58, 25 December 2006 (UTC)

Done. Some editors keep making it worse. danedouard00 21:24, 25 December 2006 (UTC)

The section was rewritten and cleaned to anyone's liking...but no reliable sources and "citation needed" captions everywhere. I observe what goes on in the Mexican American community about the issue of stereotypes. There wasn't enough mention on today, there is less overt discrimination against Mexican Americans. But, the main problems affecting the ethnic group are immigration problems (legality and status) and the impact of large sources of "Mexican" cheap labor. The Mexican cultural niche is stronger because of millions of Mexicans straight out of the rural interior states, carried much of their culture over the border and not the same culture you may find in Mexico city, the beach resorts or in east Los Angeles. Not all Mexicans are the same and most older generation Mexican Americans think of themselves as Americans of Mexican descent...not "Mexicans" happen to live in another country. + 63.3.14.129 05:56, 24 January 2007 (UTC)
Good job on cleaning up... Looks a lot more factual and less stereotypical. Deepstratagem 07:12, 14 April 2007 (UTC)

Ridiculous bias. TOTALLY DISPUTED[edit]

Sorry, but you don't get to write screeds attractive to your particular form of victimology on Wikipedia. Referring to the Minutemen and SOS as "nativist" and "extremist" groups which target Mexican-Americans is about as far from NPOV as it gets. And how about a source here and there to support some of the more absurd claims in the 'Racism' section?

I found out about this article by following a vandal who likes to make silly little modifications to immigration reform groups' entries. I see he has been hard at work on this page. BulldogPete 02:28, 19 May 2007 (UTC)

"related groups" info removed from infobox[edit]

For dedicated editors of this page: The "Related Groups" info was removed from all {{Infobox Ethnic group}} infoboxes. Comments may be left on the Ethnic groups talk page. Ling.Nut 17:17, 19 May 2007 (UTC)

allegations of racism are funny[edit]

Mexican is not, has never been and will never be a race. I have cousins in Mexico City that are completely White (although I am not) they have not a single (known) drop of Indian blood. As a matter of fact, if they came to the states, you'd probably think they were Americans with Speech problems. Mestizo Mexicans may be Indian, but they're White too. There is no some other race. Most Mexican Americans should probably claim themselves as "Two or more races" because that is what most of them are. I'm White. I'm American Indian. I have enough sense to acknowledge I'm both. I really don't think It's fair that the BIA won't let them classify themselves as Indian, but they should at least classify themselves as White, considering most of them do have White ancestry.


Let's go back to ancient times and explain where the term of "white" came from...The "white" people are from Europe. Germans, English, French, Greek, and Russian are all "white." Spaniards and Portugual are African from the Moors and Italians. Italians are from Egypt and Mesopotania area. They did alot of trading back in the day and alot of people moved into Europe from Mesopotania and Egypt area. If you ever come to Europe you can even see their facial features are so different. Russians are white like snow, and blond hair. English are white thin and brown hair. French are almost like the Italians with a little color, but the French women are a bit rounder in the face. Italians have their glow from the sun and the prodominant nose. Germans are white some brown some blond haired, deep voice and mainly medium build. The German men are quite strait and their hair is always quite thick. So eventhough they are "white" they are all different.

Indian in fact is a person that is native to that country. So unless your family dates back hundreds of years in America you shouldn't label yourself as an Indian

If you are not white then why are you American Indian? If you were born in the US you are a US Citizen, your race depends on where your ethnicity comes from. If your family comes from Latin America, then it is specified as such. I was born in the US but my family comes from Mexico and Spain. My family that still lives in Monterrey is also white skined, but they are Mestizos. I on the other hand am a Mexican American, or Latina. (Hispanic is someone from Hispanola, Cuban, Puerto Rican decendance or African decendence.)

In the future I see the government making "other" selection invalid. There will be many choices to choose from, especially if more and more minority get into the congress.—Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.166.142.3 (talkcontribs)

do you know something? You have no right to tell me I'm not Indian. I have an Indian grandfather and an Indian grandmother. So, yes, I am Indian. But. I'm still White. Don't tell be otherwise. That by they way, was a personal attack on me. Iamanadam 15:32, 12 August 2007 (UTC)

Mestizo is a race and if they are Mestizo, they are not white. I am Mestizo because I have Native Mexican blood in me but I also have Spaniard blood in me so I am Mestizo but not white. There are people in my family who are dark skinned and light skinned but the ones who are light skinned do not have european features. Me, I'm not white, my race is technically Mestizo not white despite me having European blood in me that I got it from hundreds of years ago when the Spaniards conquered our anscestors. People like me should put "other" when talking about race and not white unless they have prodominantly european blood.German16rs 14:49, 14 August 2007 (UTC)

Actually, Mestizo isn't a 'race', but it doesn't matter because there is only one human race and different groupings. It seems that you're trying to say that you are Native American with European blood that isn't a part of you. "our ancestors" (meaning Native Americans in Mexico) are not our ONLY ancestors...the Europeans are as well. Just because you think you're not white, doesn't mean it's correct. Mestizo's are both, not Native Americans just raped by Europeans as people put it, rather grotesquely I think. Cali567 00:29, 15 August 2007 (UTC)

Merge List of notable Chicanos into List of Mexican Americans[edit]

See discussion at Talk:List of notable Chicanos. Pairadox 19:48, 27 August 2007 (UTC)

History of Latinos and Hispanics[edit]

Please consider contributing to the article entitled History of Latinos and Hispanics. Thank you! --JuanMuslim 1m 02:03, 30 August 2007 (UTC)

Politics and Entertainment[edit]

This article really needs a section that discusses politics. The fact that the current attorney general, governor of new mexico, and mayor of the second largest city in the US are all Mexican American isn't even mentioned.

There should also be a sports and entertainment section. Again, it should be mentioned that three starting NFL quarterbacks are of Mexican descent. There are also quite a few Mexican American entertainers such as Robert Rodriguez, Eva Langoria and Jennifer Alba that have achieved international fame.

ComputerChess 01:10, 1 September 2007 (UTC)

cities....[edit]

Other cities in the Upper Midwest with thriving Mexican American communities are Detroit; Indianapolis; Kansas City, Missouri; St. Louis; Milwaukee; and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.

True, the Midwest U.S. along with the Southeast U.S. and the Northeast seen a dramatic increase of Mexican-Americans, Mexican immigration and other Hispanics in the 1990's and again the 2000's, a major demographic phenomenon across the U.S. including the states of Alaska and Hawaii had seen Hispanics grew several times by percentages. You can visit Syracuse, NY; Pittsburgh, PA; Tulsa, OK and Louisville, KY to find Mexican and other Hispanic neighborhoods appeared within 5 years time; whole blocks have stores, mama y papa-owned shops, restaurants and butcher shops (carnicerias) cater to their Hispanic customer base; and the presence of Spanish-language radio or TV stations. +71.102.2.206 (talk) 12:59, 11 May 2009 (UTC)

WHAT ABOUT THE LARGE MEX-AM POPULATION IN CHICAGO? - signed by an anon IP

Mexican-Americans are widely scattered across the U.S. beyond the four border states (Cal., Tex., Ariz. & New Mex.). The city of Chicago has over 1.5 million Mexicans, perhaps has the title of the largest Mexican-American community outside the Southwest or Western U.S. states. There are largely Mexican-American neighborhoods in several towns in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma and more recently, North and South Dakota. + 71.102.2.206 (talk) 00:14, 7 April 2009 (UTC)
In addition, states like Montana and Wyoming are over 5 percent Hispanic with the majority of that subsection being of Mexican ancestry. Half the population of several Idaho towns or cities with red links to indicate there are no articles or were deleted (or restored): Ada County, Idaho, Bannock County, Idaho, Caldwell, Nampa and Nyassa, Idaho/Nyassa, Oregon area seem to be seasonal/temporary-resident migrant laborers of Mexican or other Hispanic nationality. I came to notice someone corrected the percentages of Mexican-born and Mexican descent in the top 25 communities lists, perhaps to indicate the singular or "in addition to" ancestry by personal details who said "I'm completely" or "partially" Mexican-American in these places. Mecca, California is said to be 90% Hispanic, but only 20% are Mexican and over 55% are born in Mexico often of Central American nationality when their parents temporarily stayed in Mexico en route to the USA. + 71.102.2.206 (talk) 12:59, 11 May 2009 (UTC)
A separate article: The List of Mexican-American communities was deleted as of May 1st, due to inaccurate edits and poor amount of resources to back up the entries, and the flexibility of the Mexican populations in several communities by economic conditions in both Mexico and the U.S. during the current global recession. There was a general decrease of the Hispanic population in the Hazleton, Pennsylvania area, a hotbed of anti-illegal immigration laws and sentiment by residents and city council officials in the mid 2000s. Mexican-Americans and other Latino ethnic groups are found in all 50 states, both are viewed as a major factor of demographic change in the first decade of the 21st century. The main reason for sudden appearance and high growth of Mexicans in the U.S. was from economic booms of the late 20th century, whenever Mexico has a serious economic crisis brought by the devaluation of the peso and the inability to create more good-paid jobs for the fast-growing national population. The nomadic influx of Mexican and Latino labor being seasonal, like a group of construction workers or farm laborers may be in Farmingville, New York in one month but can drive down to Manassas, Virginia or Belle Glade, Florida the next month. + Mike D 26 (talk) 14:08, 10 May 2009 (UTC)
The impact of Mexican immigration is being felt across the USA, in all 50 states and DC. The US census found Hispanics are now the largest minority group in nearly all 50 states, including the far north ones like Vermont and North Dakota, and even Hispanic immigrants made themselves at home in Alaska. The demographic change in the last 10-20 years since 1990, although the trend began in the late 1970's and 1980's when the economies in Latin America was in terrible shape caused a "push-and-pull" effect to the USA. Hispanics, such as Cubans and Puerto Ricans are in all 50 states along side with Mexican-Americans moving into areas away from the Mexican border and not traditionally known for having a Hispanic cultural influence have created new enclaves & communities in them. + 71.102.7.77 (talk) 22:24, 11 March 2010 (UTC)

The "Images of America" book series has several books on Mexican-American and Latino communities. http://www.arcadiapublishing.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=arcadia&Category_Code=Mexican-American 71.102.1.95 (talk) 11:11, 21 March 2014 (UTC)

Racial Classification[edit]

I really believe the racial classification sections should be shortened, nearly a third of this article is related to that one issue. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Dreamcast88 (talkcontribs) 02:43, 3 November 2007 (UTC)

Make better and more comprehensive[edit]

Someone should really consider and make an effort to make the Mexican American reference a lot more robust. This version of the page has been like this for so long and really only touches on the obvious issues of immigration and discrimination. What about traditions? What about holidays? What about contributions? There is absolutely a whole lot more to the Mexican American. I suggest one reference the Chinese American and the Filipino American. Now those are fine and quality references of a culture. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.220.59.176 (talk) 01:33, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

I had not noticed that. I hope those who edit this article regularly take your advice to heart. SamEV (talk) 01:49, 2 January 2008 (UTC)
I believe information in the History of Mexican-Americans articles should be integrated into this article. It seems to address more contemporary issues than this main article.

KayoRu (talk) 04:17, 8 January 2008 (UTC)

The article has included a section on ethnic "segregation" of Mexican Americans, it's well informative and has in-depth information. How about one section on educational issues affecting this ethnic group? In the 1970s, the California Dept. of Education studies has found in special education classes across the state, there were unusually high numbers of Mexican American students were wrongly labeled as mentally "retarded". But the study confirms these students misplaced in special education classes had lacked enough proficiency in the English language and came from households with little resources to boost academic performance. If given tests in their native language (Spanish) or had more resources for them available, they would have about the same level of academic performance. + 71.102.53.48 (talk) 20:32, 29 May 2008 (UTC)

Start from scratch[edit]

I'm often amazed at Wikipedia's informative and balanced articles. Of course, being an open encyclopedia, one might encounter an article reminiscent of a generous C- high school Social Studies paper. Even this talk page is nothing more than a fleshed out "Rants and Raves" section of Craiglist. In other words, someone shit the bath on this one. I'm pretty sure the self appointed victims who wrote this article contribute greatly to the low opinion of Wikipedia that many adhere too. This article is biased, inaccurate and inarticulate. I really hope the contributers of the article "Mexico" (an excellent example of what Wikipedia's content should be) are up to do the research of Mexican Americans. Then we might have something here. BTW 'Anglo' is not a synonym for white or Caucasian. To use such a loaded term seriously (and constantly) reveals a possibly racist and definitely ignorant mind at work here. Select All, Delete, start from scratch.

-I completely agree. I made the statement above about the comparison with this poorly fragmented and unbalanced article and other fine examples such as the article on Chinese Americans or Mexico. Way too much opinion and not enough facts to inform others of the Mexican American culture. It's almost embarrassing to know that people have referenced this when wanting to learn about my culture. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.220.50.9 (talk) 06:54, 30 June 2008 (UTC)


"Mexican" American pictures[edit]

Is all the "Mexican" people picture a white people or what. There is no really brown Mexican person. What is going on? Mexicans hate their ethnicity? and everyone is white, which they are not about 99% of them. Mexicans are brown people not some mixed Spanish people. They are not white people and the Mexican template almost all of them are white Spanish in there. 71.237.70.49 (talk) —Preceding comment was added at 19:57, 3 July 2008 (UTC)

Mexicans are mostly of European and Indian descent. Mexico has one of Latin America's largest White populations... Mexican Americans account for most of all the White Hispanics in the U.S. The pictures represent Mexicans, Mestizo, White and Indian... Your reasoning isn't correct that all Mexicans are non-white. It was never stated Mexicans were Spaniards, although most/many descend from places in Spain, France, Italy, etc I understand your "concern" that Mexicans look "brown"... You may not have had the chance to travel the world and see for yourself things that you may think as fact are not always so. (Millions of people have wrong assumption about Mexico/Latin America Many of the new immigrants are Indians from Southern Mexico. But, Populations of immigrants from other countries do not always mirror the ethnic make up of the majority of the people in that country. Example: Most Cuban Americans are White, yet Cuba is a Mulatto nation. Please read more for your sake. Cali567 (talk) 18:23, 5 July 2008 (UTC)
Let me backup my claim with numbers. Mexican population is around 106 million, White Mexican is around 16 million, which would be around 15 million. That is not the "most" of Mexicans. 71.237.70.49 (talk) 03:46, 6 July 2008 (UTC)
You are the one being ignorant, and you have eyes to see! Mexicans as a whole come from two main groups: Europeans and Amerindians. This is a fact, and it is verified. If you don't want to believe this factual statement, then you don't have to. That does not mean it doesn't belong in an encyclopedia.Cali567 (talk) 06:35, 7 July 2008 (UTC)
Mexican Americans and Mexicans are not the same group of people when talking statistically, so you might want to start reading about them as seperate groups. You are misreading most of the introduction. The word "most" is not just before "Mexicans are White", if you see that, then please change it. However, Most Mexicans do descend from Europeans and also the Indigenous population of Mexico. Mexico's ethnic make-up is mostly Mestizo (Part Amerindian and part White), also it has a large European Population and a (somewhat) larger Amerindian Population. Therefore most Mexicans descend from Europe, as you can say most descend from Mexico itself (Meaning Indegenous People). In the Intro it must be stated that Mexicans, in general, are descendants of both groups... that's why Europe is added. You seem to be the one who is confused about this.By the Way, you may want to get familiar with the Census classifications. Example, Whites are people from Europe, the Middle East, and Northern Africa.
About the "Any Mexican who thinks of him/herself "white" is not "white" in actually "white people"s views" issue, this is a matter of opinion. It is not the right, or business of people to say whether or not someone is a particular race/ethnicity/culture. Many groups such as the Irish, Germans, Italians, etc. were not considered White by some. This means nothing.

Right, it is not the same the Northern states of Mexico and the Southern states. In Southern states, home of the old Aztec and Maya Empires, there is a large Native American minority and the Indian percentage is much larger than average. Meanwhile, in the North of Mexico (from Baja California to Tamaulipas) there is a large percentage of Whites, as these states were colonized by Spaniards and other European immigrants being sparcely populated. According to the last racial census in Mexico (1921) more than 30% of the population in states like Sonora were White. Anyway, it is evident a majority of Mexicans are mestizo (Euro-Indian) both in Mexico and in the U.S., but in the U.S. the percentage of White Mexicans is higher as there was a large population of Spanish European immigrants in Western states like New Mexico, Texas and California and a large immigration from next door Mexican Northern states like Nueveo Leon and Sonora with a large White minority...--83.53.111.12 (talk) 15:35, 28 April 2009 (UTC)

Why are you so obsessed with people's "racial purity"? Doesn't this type of talk belong on the Stormfront.org web site? Do you also talk like this on the Jews page? You sound like a Nazi obsessed with "race purity" pseudoscience. I don't think this racial purity nonsense belongs in an encyclopedia in the year 2010. it belongs in an encyclopedia from the year 1938. Dropmeoff (talk) 00:24, 17 January 2010 (UTC)
With all due respect, you are the one who is carrying the tone of racism. If you have any constructive activity to persue, by all means, do it. C.Kent87 (talk) 04:55, 17 January 2010 (UTC)

This is hilarious. So in people's opinion, one must be Native Indian looking to be Mexican? Mexico is a racially diverse nation. They have different versions and colors of people just like the United States. Why can't people recognize this? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.110.43.69 (talk) 20:16, 30 April 2009 (UTC)

Bill Richardson, Eva Longoria and Cesar Chávez wouldn´t be considered whites in Spain but mestizos (Euro-Indian)--88.18.148.134 (talk) 03:28, 9 June 2009 (UTC)

There are many Spaniards themselves who are as dark as those mentioned here. Do not use blanket observations in your quest for - whatever it is. C.Kent87 (talk) 04:55, 17 January 2010 (UTC)

Ellen Ochoa Mexican?[edit]

Is she really Mexican? It states that she is Hispanic? Not necessarily Mexican? 71.237.70.49 (talk) 22:31, 3 July 2008 (UTC)

It is stated that she is a Mexican-American born in Los Angeles. Cali567 (talk) 18:25, 5 July 2008 (UTC)

Economic Force[edit]

Is their any info. of Mexican-American GDP as a nationality? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.174.47.151 (talk) 08:12, 2 August 2008 (UTC)

Image copyright problem with Image:Gabbysolis12.jpg[edit]

The image Image:Gabbysolis12.jpg is used in this article under a claim of fair use, but it does not have an adequate explanation for why it meets the requirements for such images when used here. In particular, for each page the image is used on, it must have an explanation linking to that page which explains why it needs to be used on that page. Please check

  • That there is a non-free use rationale on the image's description page for the use in this article.
  • That this article is linked to from the image description page.

The following images also have this problem:

This is an automated notice by FairuseBot. For assistance on the image use policy, see Wikipedia:Media copyright questions. --23:07, 12 September 2008 (UTC)

Improved Article[edit]

Very, very happy to see that this entry has come a long way in terms of content, length and facts. Although it still has some problems with editing and the flow of the article. Specifically, the "Mexican-American communities" section is much too long. Find a way to keep it relevant, but shorten it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.220.50.223 (talk) 04:19, 18 May 2009 (UTC)

Follow up: The last half of the article focuses way too much on the political and social issues. I count about 3-5 different sections with huge paragraphs dedicated to these topics. Lets summarize, clean these up and add more about the contributions of Mexican Americans and culture to American society. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.220.50.223 (talk) 09:08, 22 June 2009 (UTC)

I very much agree, most articles on other ethnic groups do not have nearly as much information on these topics. Also, what is the reason for the 'Mexican-Americans in Pro sports' section? Mexican Americans are a part of dozens of other, more important, occupations such as politics, entertainment, music, etc. Why only sports? C.Kent87 (talk) 23:39, 1 November 2009 (UTC)


Recent additions[edit]

Ok Fernirm you must read and understand this pages --->Wikipedia:No original research and Wikipedia:Neutral point of view, Moxy (talk) 05:54, 26 July 2010 (UTC)

I don't really see how removing two ungrammatical and highly debatable sentences count as original research or NPOV. If my reading of the history page is correct, Fernirm didn't write anything--he was deleting information. So I don't understand your complaint. Aristophanes68 (talk) 05:50, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
You are correct my mistake....just trying to fix all the damage he has done ....was wrong here Moxy (talk) 05:54, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
Ah, I see from the user's history how this happened. Aristophanes68 (talk) 05:59, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
All the damage I have done? This Moxy guy stalks me wherver I edit (out of good faith) and always reverts my edits. Please stop Moxy, or I will report you.--Fernirm (talk) 06:04, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
Pls yes bring your actions to admin ...Because we can not i repeat can not let you change things at will because you think your right as you have done here, here, here..just in the past few days ...if you not sure what a nationality is pls don't make them up. With that said you are correct in the Mexican American indecent....and i am sorry for that...just normally your edits are not constructive and your POV so i though jeff was right here. Moxy (talk) 06:05, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
I understand, but those are not vandalism, perhaps those are POV edits, and I am sorry if they are such, and regarding the Cuban Asian edit, it's just that most articles on Wikipedia that use the term "Asian" use it in a US-centric form and not a more worldly form per se. And by the way, white and Asian do not constitute nationalities. BUT, what I highly dislike is the fact that you said that I "tricked" you, how can I "trick" you into doing an edit? Explain to me how is that possible?--Fernirm (talk) 06:15, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
I simply though you did an edit...but it was actually me that added the info...Again i am sorry for saying that...Moxy (talk) 06:37, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
The Family Values paragraph in the article was removed and deleted, because the wikipedian (or was it an anon editor) claim it perpetuates stereotypes and claims there was no factual research data to back up the belief on "Mexican Americans have strong family connections". Mike D 26 (talk) 13:00, 25 May 2012 (UTC)

THE NEW MEXICAN AMERICAN PICTURES[edit]

The pictures are okay, except for Carlos Santana, Jessica Alba, and Selena Gomez. Santana was born in Mexico and spent a significant amount of time there. Alba and Gomez are only half Mexican, I suggest that whoever made the picture montage remove Alba and put Damian Chapa in her place, and remove Santana and put Mark Sanchez in his place, and finally, remove Gomez and replace her with Richard E. Cavazos or George Lopez (best would probably be the latter just to represent Mexican diversity). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.83.14.44 (talk) 04:28, 27 November 2010 (UTC)

Jennifer Pena instead of Selena Quintanilla? WTF? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.229.147.153 (talk) 19:18, 5 February 2011 (UTC)

Do people not understand the concept of copyright? From Selena09.jpg "This work is copyrighted..." "...Any other uses of this image, on Wikipedia or elsewhere, may be copyright infringement." hence Pena. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.120.1.206 (talk) 10:33, 9 February 2011 (UTC)

Please someone put a picture of Selena Quintanilla on here — Preceding unsigned comment added by Tejanorules (talkcontribs) 20:30, 8 May 2013 (UTC)

Proposal to ban user-created montages from Infoboxes[edit]

You are invited to join the discussion at Wikipedia_talk:WikiProject_Ethnic_groups#Infobox_Images_for_Ethnic_Groups. Bulldog123 09:44, 1 February 2011 (UTC)

Mexican Americans[edit]

America is a big place. It goes from Argentina up through Greenland. All Mexicans are Americans. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.190.205.169 (talk) 02:25, 27 May 2011 (UTC)

In the English language, "America" refers to the United States WhisperToMe (talk) 17:22, 24 March 2012 (UTC)

I am sorry your education system failed you, but you are north americans not americans. Americans are from the USA, North Americans are from the continent of north america and south americans from the continent of south america.71.241.250.239 (talk) 22:35, 30 May 2011 (UTC)

Not true. The entire hemisphere is America. We're all Americans, not just the folks in the USA. Aristophanes68 (talk) 23:54, 31 May 2011 (UTC)
Dear anonymous IP. I don't know why you believe that America is the name of a country. It might be the affectionate name or short name of a country (long form name United States of America, short name America), but America is the name of an entire continent too; "The Americas" in the 7 continents model. You should take a look here -> America and at the article ->Americas. The demonym for any person living in America/Americas is American. Karnifro (talk) 01:37, 13 June 2011 (UTC)
But that's not the usage established in the English language. In English "American" refers to someone from the United States. This is not how it's used in Spanish, but we aren't on the Spanish Wikipedia. This debate will not be productive, because the preferred English form is clearly "Mexican American" WhisperToMe (talk) 17:23, 24 March 2012 (UTC)

How many legal Mexican citizens live in the US?[edit]

  — Preceding unsigned comment added by 94.174.93.197 (talk) 00:58, 10 July 2011 (UTC) 
I suspect this is a question motivated by the darker impulses of mankind. However I will answer it. No government agency keeps such statistics. There are plenty of them and one should never assume that someone here is Illegal. The vast vast majority of Mexican Americans are people who's families came here legally, have been here for many generations, and in many cases were on the land before we conquered it from Mexico. --Hfarmer (talk) 18:13, 1 September 2011 (UTC)


If you factor in the Reagan amnesty of the 1980s, which legalized almost 5 million [mostly] Mexican illegal aliens. And then factor in the 12 million + illegal aliens present in the nation today [again mostly mexican] - Those two figures combined equals out to some 17 million illegal aliens, so nearly half of the 35 million strong Mexican-American population is or was, illegal aliens. Also that is not counting the children of illegal aliens born in the USA, if you add them in then logically the vast majority of the Mexican-American population is descended from illegal aliens, either from a parent or both parents, or from their grandparents. 107.222.205.242 (talk)

Orphaned references in Mexican American[edit]

I check pages listed in Category:Pages with incorrect ref formatting to try to fix reference errors. One of the things I do is look for content for orphaned references in wikilinked articles. I have found content for some of Mexican American's orphans, the problem is that I found more than one version. I can't determine which (if any) is correct for this article, so I am asking for a sentient editor to look it over and copy the correct ref content into this article.

Reference named "2010 Census":

I apologize if any of the above are effectively identical; I am just a simple computer program, so I can't determine whether minor differences are significant or not. AnomieBOT 19:21, 27 July 2012 (UTC)

Infobox image POV[edit]

I am concerned that the infobox image that is used as of this time stamp, which is current as of my posting, does not abide by WP:NPOV. It is heavily weighted, and thus gives undue weight, to one political party (the Democrat Party) in the United States, and improperly excludes notable Mexican Americans who maybe of other political parties. Therefore, I will tag the article accordingly.--RightCowLeftCoast (talk) 00:28, 28 September 2012 (UTC)

Pictures[edit]

You need to take off the pictures of Demi Lovato and Jessica Alba. This is a page talking about Mexican Americans. Demi and Jessica are only part Mexican. They are mostly white, so therefore, they should not be included in this article. Replace their pictures with Selena Quintanilla and Joe Lopez. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Tejanorules (talkcontribs) 04:34, 9 May 2013 (UTC)

Both Selena Gomez and Demi Lovato are 50% Mexican ancestry, where do you suggest we put them? The German-American or Italian-American section?? B575 (talk) 01:25, 19 February 2014 (UTC)