Talk:Microsoft Silverlight

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Microsoft / .NET (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Microsoft, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Microsoft on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject .NET (marked as High-importance).
 
WikiProject Computing / Software (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computing, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of computers, computing, and information technology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Software.
 
Former good article nominee Microsoft Silverlight was a Engineering and technology good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
July 2, 2007 Good article nominee Not listed


Would end user ever know if Silverlight is used for anything on their computer?[edit]

I can tell when media comes up in RealPlayer, AdobeFlash, WindowsMediaPlayer, etc. I have never seen a window called Silverlight. Is it just wasting space on the hard drive? Can someone give concrete examples of programs utilizing this resource? The info posted is more for developers. As an end user the article is not informative at all. What will I give up if I delete the program? How can I tell if it has ever been accessed on my pc? I can open the SilverLight Settings but they don't seem to shed any light on what the application DOES FOR ME. Please add information geared toward the End User Actual Experience. Thankyou.

108.13.34.223 (talk) 20:42, 24 June 2012 (UTC)

As far as I can tell Silverlight is an essential part of the user experience for enjoying multimedia content on Microsofts's own websites, but hardly anyone else uses it. I note that trying to view the online Windows 8 demo brings up the 'install Silverlight' begging screen so they are still desparately trying to get people to use it. I have almost never visited a website that needs silverlight to play content other than Microsoft's own websites. The Yowser (talk) 10:06, 27 July 2012 (UTC)
Actually, if you ever watch Netflix on your PC, or your HDTV connected to your PC through HDMI, then you are using Silverlight. I am unsure if it is used in any other internet connected devices (such as Wii) to watch Netflix. On an unrelated note, could this article have actually been anymore biased without completely shedding the thinnest viel of objectivity it tries to achieve? Honestly. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.121.138.37 (talk) 14:56, 16 August 2012 (UTC)
Silverlight is more akin to Flash than a typical application like Windows Media Player. As such, you wouldn't see it launched to view media from your hard drive like RealPlayer, Winamp, or Windows Media Player. (I would argue that Flash doesn't even do that either) It would launch if you installed a Silverlight app to your system as an out-of-browser application, just like Flash can run SWF files/apps from your hard drive. Most of these uses tend to be line-of-business applications. But if you want another common usage of Silverlight, from what I understand, the last couple of olympics' (summer and winter) online broadcasts were in Silverlight exclusively. FizixMan83 (talk) 23:20, 4 December 2012 (UTC)

Relation to html5[edit]

Article fails to explain relation of Silverlight and html5, since they functionally overlap to a large degree. Besides DRM, there is probably nothing in Silverlight that isn't covered by html5. And provided that DRM isn't of concern html5 is a better solution in all cases, especially in the view of Silverlight being not a standards driven technology. Yurivict (talk) 07:11, 14 November 2012 (UTC)

Isn't Silverlight basically dead?[edit]

Despite the maintenance releases? Former PM said so http://www.neowin.net/news/former-microsoft-pm-silverlight-is-dead Also not a word on anything new in two years as astute observers note http://www.i-programmer.info/news/89-net/6860-silverlight-support-roadmap.html and an expiration date has been set for 2021 http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9238421/Netflix_to_dump_Silverlight_Microsoft_s_stalled_technology This wiki article reads very much like an advert way out of touch with reality. 188.27.81.64 (talk) 05:37, 9 July 2014 (UTC)

64 bit[edit]

Just a personal issue, went to go watch Netflix and it told me to update Silverlight. Never knew that Netflix required SL as addressed in these comments. Then discovered after two failed attempts that the Netflix update gives you a 64 bit installation that won't run on my "old" laptop. I had to go sniffing around on Microsoft for a 32 bit upgrade and still haven't tried Netflix yet.

How in hell does a company as large as Netflix make such a glaring error by ASSUMING that everyone out there uses a new computer, and provides no alternatives? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Blondesareeasy (talkcontribs) 06:30, 15 August 2014 (UTC)