Talk:Microsoft Word

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Article Title[edit]

Why is this article named Microsoft Office Word, when all the other office apps have the word Office omitted? I think that Office should not be included in the title. Most people know the product as Microsoft Word rather than Microsoft Office Word. Word is, indeed, the name of the application and Office is simply the package within which it is sold. Has anyone else an opinion on this? Ralphy 18:20, 23 April 2006 (UTC)

MS does now refer to this app as "microsoft offfice word" (look in the about dialog for instance. Is there a policy on what to do when the estabilished name for a product differs from the makers current name? Plugwash 18:24, 23 April 2006 (UTC)
Not all of the other Office applications have the word "Office" ommitted. The article names should be as accurate as possible in its naming. Redirects along with some prose can explain older names like "Word for Windows" and "Microsoft Word". Warrens 19:16, 23 April 2006 (UTC)
Regardless of how this particular discussion turns out, the article should be updated to mention the name issue. For instance, the 2004 Mac version is named (in various places) Microsoft Word, Microsoft® Word 2004 for Mac and Word:Mac, but never Microsoft Office Word 2004. --Steven Fisher 22:16, 2 May 2006 (UTC)

I agree the title should be Microsoft Word -- I've also started a discussion on the Microsoft Excel talk page| Cliffb 01:18, 10 May 2006 (UTC)

Just so everyone knows, Microsoft Word is not always sold with office. It can be be purchased either by itself, or with Microsoft Works, as not all people want all of the office programs, but still need a word proccessor. So, putting "office" in the title is not neccessary, because although it is technically microsoft office word, it doesn't always come bundled with office. --Kormerant 23:02, 4 July 2006 (UTC)

Agreed. The "Office" is a form of emphasis of the product's inclusion in Office, not a formal part of the product name; but as it is also sold separately, with Works, and for the Mac, the inclusion of Office in the title is incongruous. Microsoft itself refers to it as "Word" not "Office Word" [1]. I shall rename the article.  ProhibitOnions  (T) 09:27, 5 July 2006 (UTC)

I see we've been moved again.[edit]

Needs to get moved back to Microsoft Word. But that won't solve anything, since it'll just get moved back again by someone else who thinks he's the first person to catch on to the official product name on Windows. Time for some level of protection, maybe? --Steven Fisher 18:11, 3 August 2007 (UTC)

Hear hear! +Hexagon1 (t) 11:02, 21 August 2007 (UTC)

Moving this page and all other Microsoft Office applications to new name as "Microsoft Office Word"[edit]

I suggest moving "Microsoft Word" to "Microsoft Office Word" as it's the new name since version 2003 and also moving all other Office applications, i.e. Powerpoint, Excel, etc., since some articles (e.g. Microsoft Outlook) is already named Microsoft Office Outlook on it's infobox.

GeekGod™ 09:24, 14 December 2007 (UTC)

agree - oahiyeel talk 20:15, 18 December 2007 (UTC)
This article is about all versions of Word, including those never came with any version of Office. - Josh (talk | contribs) 16:21, 20 December 2007 (UTC)

Mac Word timeline is truncated, incomplete[edit]

Under the heading "Word For Mac", the article currently gives the impression that no versions of Mac Word were released until after the formation of the Mac Business Unit in 1997, although the "Origins and growth" section of the article does document the year of shipment and significance of Mac Word 1.0, Mac Word 3.0, and Mac Word 5.1.

Shouldn't there at least be mention made of 1.0,3.0,4.0 and 5.1 under this heading?

Or else should the title of that subhead be "Word for Mac (versions after the formation of the Mac Business Unit)"?

To complete the Mac Word timeline, Mac Word 4.0 shipped in late 1988 and was the first version of Word that allowed WYSIWYG creation and editing of tables in documents.

Would it be of interest to note that Mac Word 3.0, was the beginning of the Win Word code lineage?

Approximately 1/3 of the sources for Win Word was compiled from source files that were shared with the Mac Word 4.0 project. Many other features of Win Word not implemented in the shared code, were modeled directly from features that were already proven in Mac Word. That code and design inheritance from Mac Word constituted a nearly seven year head start (1983 through 1990) on the process of adapting a word processor to a graphical windowing system, when Word Perfect finally joined the competition to launch the best word processor on Windows, after Windows 3.1 shipped.

Source: personal testimony of David Luebbert, who was a developer on the Mac Word 1.0, 3.0, and 4.0 projects and the end of the Win Word 1.0 project

DLuebbert (talk) 23:52, 7 April 2014 (UTC)DLuebbert