Talk:Mile

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Attempts to Correlate[edit]

One source implies that all miles are 8 stadia, and that all stadia are 600 of their national foot. But the English mile of 5280 feet is exactly 8 of 660 English feet; the Roman mile of 5000 Roman feet is exactly 8 of 625 feet. Greek stadia come in three forms and yet the metric conversion doesn't explain their own correlation to their own units. There is definately error because how does 8 Italian stadia equal more meters than the English mile requiring 5000 Roman feet to be larger than the 5280 English feet and yet publish a Roman foot as 11.65 English inches? Another publication states the mistake of Columbus using 20,400 Italian miles as Earth's circumference instead of 20,400 Arabic miles of which here this article says Arabic mile is 1 minute of latitude thus 360x 60 min 21,600 min to equal 21,600 miles which is 1200 miles longer circumference than the other source. Now it would make more sense that a degree would be 60 Arabic miles not 56.6 Arabic miles. But is sense enough proof? Earth's degree of latitude is very close to 69 English miles which could be the unit spaces between 70 points, thus logic.

It would seem to me that if mile means 1000 (mil) then they started with the largest unit of Earth circumference as 24 hours each 1000 miles thus 24,000 miles. Unforunately, these 1000 miles of one hour (60 minutes of time) are 15 degrees of longitude (900 minutes of arc), and thus divides these 900 minutes of arc to be 1.1111 mile per minute of arc, or the more exact 0.9 minute of arc for every mile. Until, Earth was proven more than 24,000 miles. So if the English mile was an atrempt to claim exact 1000s of miles for Earth, this is why it varies from the 5000-foot Roman mile which you would think evolved from 5 miles each mile as 1000 feet. or was there some unit that could be 1000 of 5 Roman feet? Special:Contributions/75.86.172.174|75.86.172.174]] (talk) 22:00, 28 August 2014 (UTC)

It is a simplier habbit of Swedish miles[edit]

The following: "In Norway and Sweden, a mil is a unit of length equal to 10 kilometres and commonly used in everyday language. However in more formal situations, such as on road signs and when there is risk of confusion with English miles, kilometres are used instead." should be replaced by this: "In Norway and Sweden, a mil is a unit of length equal to 10 kilometres and commonly used in everyday language. However in all formal situations, such as on road signs and law, kilometres are used. For instance road signs are read in km (like 348 km) and the last digit rounded up and always expressed in common talk always in miles (like 35 miles!)."

K is temperature and not distance[edit]

When Eurosport by Giro d'Itala says, "Oh they have 10K left" it is very very cold, and the bikes will crack and the bikers die, quick. It is really very bad language of an international Tv-channel and they should really take some internal talks about it.

Length of Roman mile[edit]

The article on Pace (unit) gives the length of a pace (two steps) as 58.1 inches. This article on the mile says a Roman mile is 1000 paces (ie 2000 steps) so therefore a Roman mile was 0.91698 of an Imperial mile. But the Imperial units article says that there are two paces for every step rather than the two steps for every pace that this article gives, so they are inconsistent. 2.101.12.80 (talk) 15:08, 29 June 2014 (UTC) Not inconsistent. one is WRONG. Or do we have 4 pints in a quart and 2 quarts in a gallon because people don't know quart and quarter means 4? Maybe these Romans were amputees working at IHOP. I would like to know why there is such sensitive issue at correcting other's mistakes, ie if you dont like K for kilometer because it is a temp for Kelvin then change it in the article to km. Many people are confused with a single m for meter when the m could be mile (mi); why not me. Or how about caps versus small 1km = 1000m not 1000M. (?) Face it no standard system cause cross-confusion that results in wasted money on Mars landers crashing, while forced standards are for many another slavery. Does it matter Columbus thought he was in China! 75.86.172.174 (talk) 22:14, 28 August 2014 (UTC)

Incorrect and untrustworthy reference in preamble[edit]

The preamble, third paragraph, makes the claim:

the international mile continues to be used in some countries such as [...] the United Kingdom[3]

The footnote [3] refers to an opinion piece from the UK Metric Association detailing cherrypicked objections to continued use of MPH has a unit of speed. The opinion piece does not back up the assertion that the UK uses the International Mile, (nor does is any claim made that the mile used in the UK is defined in terms of metric units). I suggest the link is removed altogether, to be substituted with a link to some suitable legal decision detailing the UK's definition of a mile. --Rfsmit (talk) 20:52, 29 July 2014 (UTC)