Talk:Milwaukie, Oregon

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The current collaborations of the month are Jake's Famous Crawfish & Hillcrest Youth Correctional Facility.

I removed the following, which doesn't make much sense:

Milwaukie but it failed to realize the growth that many nearby cities attained and that Lot Whitcomb anticipated, until fears of the hazard of powder houses built along the railroad, along with general disatisfaction with the condition of streets energized the people of the town to incorporate, on February 4, 1903.

In ?? a gas station business owner on McLoughlin Blvd brought in an authentic World War II B17G bomber to help attract customers; today this serves as a landmark.

[[User:Poccil|Peter O. (Talk)]] 04:29, Oct 11, 2004 (UTC)

Living History Day[edit]

The virtual schoolhouse web site is "funded by the National School-To-Work Office, a joint initiative of the US Departments of Education and Labor." The Milwaukie High School Living History Day is a project on the site. This constitutes national recognition. ABLsaurusRex 22:22, 4 August 2007 (UTC) And, of course, there is the minor matter of the mention of the event by the President of the United States during the ground breaking for the WWII Memorial [1] ABLsaurusRex 22:39, 4 August 2007 (UTC)

Origins of the name Milwaukie[edit]

  • I grew up in Milwaukie, and a name on the feed mill that once (still? haven't been in 15 years - don't recall) stood at what is now 21st Ave and Lake Rd against the railroad tracks was labeled "Milkawea Feed Mill". I was always told that the town was named Milwaukie after the Native American name Milkawea. Unfortunately, I can find no Google reference to that name or the variant "Milkwea". Regardless, I dispute the name origin as a variant of "Milwaukee" in Wisconsin. Anyone have more info or can cite a credible reference to the Wisconsin origin? Mmoyer 21:00, 15 May 2006 (UTC)
Well, there's the Harvey Starkweather interview in the Library of Congress http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/wpa/30010924.html , done by a WPA worker in 1939. Harvey, born in 1868, spent all but three years of his life in Milwaukie and Portland. He didn't dispute the Wisconsin origin, although he alleged (with some justice) that the "-ie" spelling was just as good as the "-ee". (In fact, Milwaukeeans in Wisconsin hadn't settled on a single spelling when Milwaukie was incorporated.)--Orange Mike 18:43, 17 May 2006 (UTC)
The USGS GNIS placenames database says "Milwaukee" is a variant spelling of "Milwaukie", Oregon: http://geonames.usgs.gov/apex/f?p=gnispq:3:::NO::P3_FID:1166682 ..for what it's worth. I don't know if it is named after the Wisconsin city/river or not. Pfly 03:16, 17 November 2006 (UTC) ..oh and check out the variant names for Milwaukee, Wisconsin: http://geonames.usgs.gov/apex/f?p=gnispq:3:::NO::P3_FID:1577901 ..that's the longest list of variant names I've seen! Pfly 03:19, 17 November 2006 (UTC)
The City of Milwaukie cites the Wisconsin city as the source of the name [2], although they seem to be unaware that the city of Milwaukee was once spelled its name with an "ie." This material from the Milwaukee (WI) Historical Society also supports the source of the Oregon city's name (and includes rough scans of the then-"Milwaukie Sentinel").[3] I'm going to remove the "probably" from the article - certainly the city itself is a reliable source. SixFourThree (talk) 17:54, 22 February 2008 (UTC)SixFourThree
The source I used said "probably" so if you want to be definite, it would be best to add the additional citations you've listed. Katr67 (talk) 03:20, 23 February 2008 (UTC)

Notable folks[edit]

The below section was removed from the article and a quick check reveals that it isn't following our own rules (as seen in the edit note). I'm sure all these folks really did live in Milwaukie at some point, but we do need some sources. Katr67 (talk) 19:22, 11 September 2009 (UTC)

I've restored the list, but tagged it with a "cite needed" for each and every item. --Orange Mike | Talk 18:02, 17 September 2009 (UTC) in Milwaukee, WI

I added Monroe Sweetland and William U'Ren, two political leaders who represented the City in the state legislature and resided in the city. Stauffers (talk) 23:23, 7 October 2013 (UTC)stauffers

Notable residents[edit]

New City Website[edit]

I updated the City's website to its new address of www.milwaukieoregon.gov Stauffers (talk) 22:36, 7 October 2013 (UTC)stauffers

Year Founded v Settled v Platted[edit]

I updated the year of the City's founding to 1847, the year the City officially acknowledges it was initially settled by families such as the Lewellings. According to the City's sources, which incldues "A History of Milwaukie" by Charles O. Oluf's dating from the 1930s and various articles from the Milwaukie Review newspaper, the town was settled by the Lewellings (of Iowa) in 1847. The memorial stone sitting in front of City Hall notes the arrival of the Lewellings (or Luellings) in 1847. Lot Whitcomb, famed town founder, formally laid the town plat in 1849. Various local groups - including at different times the City itself - have used 1848 and 1847 as the "founding" date. Currently, the City logo features 1847 as the founding year. Its fair to say the community was originally settled - by European Americans - in 1847 and formal organization of the town began in 1849 when Whitcomb laid out his grand vision of the future City. Stauffers (talk) 15:35, 10 October 2013 (UTC)