Talk:Mobile ad hoc network

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Merge with "Mesh networking"?[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.

No. While MANETs are one example of mesh networking, there are many cases of mesh networking (sensor networks, "community" WLANs) where the nodes stay put. The unique characteristics of MANET routing protocols are a consequence of their mobility, and resulting frequent metric changes (including disconnection and new connections), not just a consequence of their ad-hocness. --Alvestrand 06:58, 12 February 2006 (UTC)

No. A classification of radio networks might look as follows: The superclass are 'ad-hoc networks' or 'packet radio networks', subclasses are 'sensor networks' (smal-scale devices, deployed in large numbers, focus on energy preservation and collection of environmental information), 'mesh networks' (STATIC ad-hoc networks, no node movement, focus is on routes with a stable throughput), 'mobile ad-hoc networks' (network is mobile, rapid link changes, routing protocols that work well in a mesh network will not work at all in a MANET); a fourth subclass may be 'vehicular ad-hoc networks', here the ressources of the car (GPS, battery, ...) are also available in contrast to a normal MANET that may run on cell phones or PDAs. Therefore energy conservation has not to be considered, position-based routing is possible, ...

No. These two things are quite different. --[[User::Drdevil44]] 16.30 16th March 2006.

Yes. The IBSS should be merged with the Mobile Ad-Hoc page. I came here from IBSS page, not mesh-networking page. Note that I too agree with above that Mesh Networking is not the same as ad-hoc. The first idea that comes to mind when you hear "ad-hoc network" is a wireless one. This is certainly the pre-dominant idea, if not the exclusive one.


The above discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.


"Mobile ad hoc social network"[edit]

This is opinion /essay / personal opinion. Therefore I am moving to Talk unless someone can provide a good justification for re-adding to the main article.

A Mobile ad hoc social network is longer and more technical term than “smart mob”. In his book Smart Mobs Howard Rheingold talks about social implications of technology and mobile ad hoc social networks.
A Mobile ad hoc social network is a new social form developed thanks to various combinations of computation, communication, and reputation and location awareness. The mobile aspect is represented by mobile phones and SMS. Ad hoc means that people by texting to particular individuals are creating social circles. This leads us to conclude that social network means that every individual in the smart mob is a “node” with social links to other individuals. Therefore nodes and links are making basics elements of communication networks, in this case mobile ad hoc social network.
Mobile ad hoc technology gives us opportunity for ad hoc meetings, mobile patient monitoring, and distribution command and control systems. Devices like mobile phones, PDA’s and laptops have become the big part of our daily life and they are taking significant part in our every day social interactions with people. We could say that mobile ad hoc social network is ultimate peer to peer system.

-- Writtenonsand 13:36, 14 November 2007 (UTC)

-- And here's the ref that was in the article
Mobile ad hoc social network (Overview):
  • Rheingold, Howard (2002). "MAS 214, Macquarie University, Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution". The Power of the Mobile Many: 288. 

Security[edit]

The security section has been added by single-issue new users. I do not have enough knowledge to determine whether the additions are self-promotion, but I suspect so. Wizzy 17:58, 14 May 2012 (UTC)


Batool Sarvi (talk) 14:19, 23 November 2012 (UTC)

Adding Persian language ...

MANETs Circa 2015?[edit]

Does this article purport to predict the future?

Also the 500BC reference is correctly sourced, but standing alone as a single sentence in an article about a computer networking without any clarification is a bit misleading. 2001:480:10:160:5653:EDFF:FE37:606A (talk) 22:49, 6 June 2014 (UTC)