Talk:Modern Greek Enlightenment

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Origins[edit]

Encyclopedia Britannica, history of Greece, The intellectual revival, 2008, O.Ed.

A significant number of schoolteachers studied, with the financial backing of their merchant benefactors, in the universities of western Europe, particularly those of Italy and the German states. There they came under the influence of the ideas of the European Enlightenment and encountered the intoxicating nationalist doctrines emanating from the French Revolution. Above all, they became aware of the reverence in which the language and culture of ancient Greece were held throughout Europe. This realization kindled in them a consciousness of their own past, a recognition of being the heirs to this same civilization and of speaking a language that had changed remarkably little in the two and a half millennia since the time of Pericles. During the 50 years or so before 1821 a veritable flood of books on the language, literature, and history of the ancient Greek world was published (albeit for the most part outside the Greek domains) for a Greek readership.

Unless you are planning to accuse Britannica of Greek POV pushing I think the text in Origins is fine.Xenovatis (talk) 12:34, 3 April 2008 (UTC)