Talk:Moeraki Boulders

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The article tries to explain their origin and fails... why are they round ? --88.164.17.243 (talk) 19:38, 25 May 2014 (UTC)


Is today's EPOD ripping us off, or what's the deal there? Melchoir 00:54, 6 July 2006 (UTC)


Not vague and redundant or anything. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 198.103.96.11 (talk) 19:07, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

"...nearly to almost perfectly spherical."

Wow that's clear as mud. Kinda like the difference between fast and really fast, or slow and kinda slow.

Wouldn't "...majority being nearly spherical." suffice? Especially when the next lines goes on to describe the ones which aren't spherical.

I have also seen these types of boulders along the Pacific coast of California, specifically, Crystal Cove at Newport Beach. The boulders are much older than those we saw in New Zealand, most of them being either flattened or reduced in diameter. The largest we saw in California were probably 8 feet in diameter, most being 3-4 feet in diameter. Amazingly, no one seems to notice these boulders. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.196.196.237 (talk) 15:29, 29 April 2008 (UTC)

These boulders also occur in a cliff face, which is inland from Amberley, New Zealand. Upstream and downstream from where Laidmore Rd hits the river. GPS co-ords -43.057426, 172.582018 and -43.057210, 172.591886. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Kiwistyler (talkcontribs) 07:10, 18 March 2012 (UTC)

How many boulders are there? Can someone include this in the article, preferrably the first paragraph? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.183.191.86 (talk) 02:59, 19 March 2013 (UTC)