Talk:Monarchy of Canada

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The Crown in Right of Canada in French[edit]

Excuse me. What is The Crown in Right of Canada in French? Komitsuki (talk) 16:26, 6 February 2014 (UTC)

per Monarchy in Quebec "the Crown within Quebec's jurisdiction is referred to as the Crown in Right of Quebec (French: couronne du chef du Québec), Her Majesty in Right of Quebec (French: Sa Majesté du chef du Québec), or the Queen in Right of Quebec (French: la reine du chef du Québec)." Qexigator (talk) 17:42, 6 February 2014 (UTC)
+ per Monarchy of Canada[1]: "... Her Majesty The Queen in Right of Canada (French: Sa Majesté la Reine du chef du Canada),..." Qexigator (talk) 17:50, 6 February 2014 (UTC)
Thank you. Komitsuki (talk) 02:32, 7 February 2014 (UTC)
But I suppose there's no literal translation of The Crown in Right of Canada into French in practice. Komitsuki (talk) 02:44, 7 February 2014 (UTC)
The literal translation of The Crown in right of Canada is La Couronne du chef du Canada. The French word chef is the modern form Old French chief: "leader, ruler, head". The English word right, in the sense here, comes from Old Norse, meaning "to rule, to lead straight, to put right". So They are literally the same, they both mean "the ruling Crown of Canada". — Preceding unsigned comment added by Notwillywanka (talkcontribs) 03:31, 7 February 2014 (UTC)
...and chief English: Etymology From Middle English, from Old French chief (“leader”), from Late Latin capum (“head”) (from which also captain, chieftain), from Latin caput (“head”) (English cap (“head covering”)), from Proto-Indo-European *kauput- (English head). ...Old French: 1.Alternative form of chief.[2] See also here[3] and here[4]. The latter mentions 'Indian chief'[5], as in 'Chief George'[6], 'Aboriginal peoples in Canada'[7], and see Section Thirty-five of the Constitution Act, 1982 and 'Aboriginal title,Canada'[8] --Qexigator (talk) 09:18, 7 February 2014 (UTC)
Is there a source for this The English word right, in the sense here, comes from Old Norse, meaning "to rule, to lead straight, to put right" comment? It's because I believe it would be worth putting this source in the article. Komitsuki (talk) 14:09, 7 February 2014 (UTC)
Just look up the etymology of the word, and don't stop with the first entry, you already did that with "chief"/"chef".