Talk:Monosaccharide

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monosaccharide[edit]

What are the origins of this word?

Greek mono-, "one", and saccharide, "sugar" (literally "son of sugar" I guess...). —Keenan Pepper 08:49, 13 April 2006 (UTC)

Have added etymology note. Thanks for pointing out. Sign posts. Richard001 04:02, 19 August 2007 (UTC)


Reducing[edit]

Needs some info re them being reducing sugars and also something (at least a link) to/about Benedict's reagent --Bob - 21:36, 11 May 2008 (UTC)-- Agreed, I don't think it needs more than a line but it is needed Jasoninkid (talk) 15:44, 12 May 2011 (UTC)

What about deoxy sugars?[edit]

Shouldn't the definition of monosaccharide also include the deoxy sugars, such as deoxyribose? Also, can we assume that "carbohydrate" is the same thing as "saccharide"? (In biochemistry they seem to be considered synonymous, but some non-bio chemists apparently consider formaldehyde and glycol aldehyde as "carbohydrates", while no one presumably would include them in the "saccharides". Also in food contexts "carbohydrate" means specifically digestible starches and sugars, excluding e.g. cellulse with is included in "fiber".). All the best, --Jorge Stolfi (talk) 00:00, 22 November 2009 (UTC)

sweet/unsweet[edit]

I noticed that the lead said some monosaccharides are sweet that implies that some exist salty bitter sour or umame is this really the case? or is the lead misleading?--209.181.16.93 (talk) 19:49, 25 March 2010 (UTC)

I think the implication is that some monosaccharides are sweet and some have no taste. So I don't think the statement is misleading. Perhaps it can be worded better to avoid confusion though. -- Ed (Edgar181) 23:39, 25 March 2010 (UTC)
Thanks for the clarification Ed--209.181.16.93 (talk) 20:20, 26 March 2010 (UTC)

why does the phosphate group attach to C1 carbon of glucose while amino group to C2 carbon?(help)Ranjitr303 (talk) 06:22, 26 July 2010 (UTC)

Well written article[edit]

I'm a layman and I can understand much of this article. That means it's well written. Thanks —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.233.69.52 (talk) 22:48, 24 October 2010 (UTC)

CH20 Redirect[edit]

Just wondering if perhaps the search "CH20" should redirect to Formaldehyde instead of this page, as Formaldehyde is CH20. Thanks 173.66.228.231 (talk) 01:57, 22 November 2010 (UTC)

CH2O is the empirical formula for monosaccharides so it makes since to redirect it here. That said there are other compounds that it is also the empirical formula or in the case of formaldehyde molecule formula. A disambiguate may be in-order instead of a redirect. Jasoninkid (talk) 15:40, 12 May 2011 (UTC)

I don't see the point?[edit]

For something so fundamental and reoccurring, it's bothering me that all I'm seeing is various facts about classifying monosaccharides and not their behaviors with other molecules. For that reason, this is a horribly written article. X-Fi6 (talk) 02:45, 25 September 2013 (UTC)