Talk:Montgomery Scott

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Rename article to Scotty?[edit]

  • 'Scotty' currently redirects to this page, and the term is surely more popular than "Montgomery Scott" when refering to the character. As per Wikipedia policy, I believe the article should be renamed. --Xiaphias 07:25, 2 May 2007 (UTC)
  • It would have to be Scotty (Star Trek): there are many people nicknamed "Scotty". Anthony Appleyard (talk) 10:59, 6 February 2008 (UTC)

Scottish cliché?[edit]

From the article:

Scotty also became a kind of general cliché for any chief engineer in the movie genre of science fiction parodies. It has also become something of a cliché for starship engineers to be Scottish — even Star Trek: The Next Generation briefly had a Scottish engineer aboard the Enterprise-D.

Isn't this just a specific example of a general case, that of the Scottish engineer as an overall stereotype, not just one restricted to science fiction? As it is, it reads as though the stereotype of the Scottish engineer springs from the character; it was certainly alive and well in the late Victorian period (Kipling's McAndrew, say), and probably earlier. Thoughts? Shimgray 02:08, 22 July 2005 (UTC)

You're correct; the stereotype doesn't originate with Star Trek. Certainly when one thinks of great engineers, James Watt comes to mind and he's quite a few centuries earlier than Scotty. :-)
Atlant 10:59, 22 July 2005 (UTC)
I'd argue Watt was a great engineer who happened to be Scottish, rather than an example of the stereotypical Scottish engineer, but I agree it's certainly an old cliché. Watt's one of the people who made it possible, arguably - it was heavily driven by Scots coal mining, and the need for steam engineers to work there, which gave the infrastructure to produce many more of them... Shimgray 12:09, 22 July 2005 (UTC)

==Since Relics== I wonder if Scotty got to meet Spock again? Perhaps not, since Spock is on a personal unification mission on Romulus. Spock may react to Scotty's still being alive as "Fascinating". Spock & Scotty surviver brothers in-arms. Mightberight/wrong 13:09, 31 October 2005

The above writer needs to read the Shatnerverse novels and some of the post TNG novels.

Addendum: To anyone who wonders how the Enterprise could have 3 captains at once. Roddenberry's original idea was that rank was an office to be held and less of military position. This was true of the Apollo missions where every astronaut was a "commander" of some aspect of the moon mission, but deferred to the real mission leader.

Can we change the bit about his having "a thick Scottish accent". I'm from Scotland and... we don't speak like that. Not at all. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 194.81.254.171 (talk) 23:03, 14 July 2009 (UTC)

We need a Scotty worthy of being called Scotty[edit]

This guy is suppose to play Scotty in the next movie?

http://www.imdb.com/gallery/ss/0363771/Ss/0363771/C282.jpg?path=pgallery&path_key=McAvoy,%20James

http://www.imdb.com/gallery/ss/0472160/Ss/0472160/P_1883.jpg?path=pgallery&path_key=McAvoy,%20James

This can't be true. --24.123.188.12 18:14, 22 May 2007 (UTC)

Are You Kidding? That Guy wouldn't Even make a good Redshirt!!Captain Eric 17:39, 30 June 2007 (UTC)

That's what it says. Does anyone have any newer information? --JRTyner 07:38, 14 October 2007 (UTC)

Request for a disambiguation page[edit]

  • There are two other notable people called Scotty; the Jamaican reggae toaster and one of Elvis Presley's original backing musicians. Could some admin create a disambiguation page please? Thanks in advance.  SmokeyTheCat  •TALK• 15:54, 27 June 2007 (UTC)
  • I made Scotty into a disambig page. Anthony Appleyard (talk) 11:06, 6 February 2008 (UTC)

Fictional atheists?[edit]

What is the basis of classifying Scotty as an atheist? If it's the line "Scotty doesn't believe in gods" from "Who Mourns for Adonais?", that line could well be interpreted as "Scotty only believes in one God". In monotheistic circles, there is often a sharp distinction between "lower-case 'g' gods" and "Capital 'g' God". On one occasion in the original series (which episode escapes me), he says "thank heaven" when Kirk's life is saved to be admonished by Spock who tells him no deity was involved. If there are other canonical references to Scotty's belief or lack thereof, please post them. Rockhopper10r 14:25, 26 October 2007 (UTC)

  • To us, there might be a difference between god and God but to the inhabitants of the 23rd century, it may just mean "any gods" whatsoever. Also, consider that McCoy is always making exclamations to heaven, God or "The Lord". He may or may not seriously believe. In Star Trek The Motion Picture, he asks "But what else is there than the Universe?" when they learn that V'Ger wants to transcend. In Wrath of Khan, he says "According to myth, Earth was created in six days". Key word is "myth" meaning that he considers the book of Genesis as just a story.Mr. ATOZ (talk) 20:19, 19 November 2007 (UTC)
Two points to consider:
  • The original series was written in the 1960s, not the 23rd Century, so linguistic cconventions would surely not be so different from our own.
  • A goodly number of modern Christians and Jews consider the first eleven chapters of the Book of Genesis--though not the entire book--to be myth.

I'm not convinced that Scotty would be considered an atheist, a Christian or anything in particular.Rockhopper10r (talk) 03:03, 20 November 2007 (UTC)

It's been nearly a month and so far no one has given an indisputable, canonical example of Scotty's atheism. If no one else comes forward, I'll remove this article from the category.Rockhopper10r (talk) 14:37, 22 November 2007 (UTC)

20th Century fact: Roddenberry was a Humanist like Azimov and not an atheist until later in life, and neither men fall into the category of atheists who fell out with God, as with Azimov's parents or most anti-christian atheists, like Madeline O Hare. Imagine that no one reading this "believes" in Enki because you were never (until now) exposed to 'him' you do not count as an infidel nor an atheist because you cant believe in a god you are never exposed to. Consider that the last 2000 years of history has been a very real conquest of one particular god over all random 'minor' gods. After all, do you even know what pagan arab gods were erased by the early Muslims? You remember the Roman gods, but not the deposed idol gods Mohammed erased. NOW finally consider this: Science right now is attempting to replace even the "last" god (Yahweh, or the "god of Abraham") with a belief in Science as religion as Hawking and his contemporaries are trying to do. If as Roddenberry hoped, even the "last" god is only a barely remembered bedtime story, then by our standards Scotty and the rest of the crew would be atheists, just as to the Spanish Inquisition, we (even the new Pope) are all heretics. And what would Jesus think? He wouldnt recognize modern Christianity at all because he was a Reform Jew. He'd be proud of us, but he'd still think of himself as Jewish. My point being, as technology evolves, so does Mankinds view of God and His place in the Human heart. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.43.18.19 (talk) 05:52, 31 December 2011 (UTC)

Unless you can provide a reference for a statement, it doesn't belong in the article. Making assumptions about what a character might have meant, or trying to decide what the context will be in 200 years doesn't cut it. Akuvar (talk) 15:36, 31 December 2011 (UTC)

Reference this: Roddenberry's life in general, his bios, authorized or not, and his own novelization of ST:TMP

Futurama Episode[edit]

It's a small point, but according to the commentary on that his episode his response was "Hell no", rather than "he-he-he" as this article says. They joke about how a simple "no" would have sufficed.92.22.16.152 (talk) 00:42, 7 August 2008 (UTC)

Pulling a Scotty[edit]

So, what does that phrase mean? Since it redirects to this page and all.... Jason A. Recliner (talk) 13:56, 17 November 2008 (UTC)

Here's some text I salvaged:

"Pulling a Scotty" is a work-related term and refers to asking for far more time than is necessary to complete a task and at the same time complaining that it may not be enough time. When the task has been completed at a leisurely pace and ahead of the proposed schedule returning to ones supervisor stating that with a superhuman effort the task was completed ahead of time.

Here's with a news link talking about it. [1] Hope that clears things up. just64helpin (talk) 21:18, 4 February 2009 (UTC)

"I'm giving her all she's got, Captain!"[edit]

I am almost 100% sure that this is one of Scotty's catchphrases. I am not even a Trekkie and I know THIS one. I mean, the theatre I was watching the new movie in went crazy when he said it. Shouldn't this phrase be noted on his page? --Oxico (talk) 00:51, 29 May 2009 (UTC)

I had thought it was a general sort of term that Scotty threw over the intercom from time to time. Alastairward (talk) 10:48, 29 May 2009 (UTC)
I think it is more of a catchphrase. I mean, even in a Burger King Star Trek advertisement, someone says it. And in the original movies, he says it a lot. --Oxico (talk) 23:55, 29 May 2009 (UTC)
Cite for that? In general he was there to say something along those lines, but I don't think that phrase was a catchphrase in itself. Happy to be corrected though. Alastairward (talk) 20:52, 30 May 2009 (UTC)
I have a cite for the movie quote, from IMDB. Here it be. What makes it a catchphrase? And should it be noted on the page? --Oxico (talk) 01:27, 31 May 2009 (UTC)
I understand it's a direct quote from the film, but where else does it occur and what has been it's cultural impact. Check out Resistance is futile and McCoy's two phrases. If you can find sources saying something similar for Scotty, I'm all for including it. Alastairward (talk) 22:30, 31 May 2009 (UTC)
It's affected me atleast, I use it when working with heating equipment.--MahaPanta (talk) 14:28, 15 July 2009 (UTC)

Admiral Archer[edit]

I think the writers of the last movie intended the name to be a reference to Jonathan Archer, but not Archer himself; Enterprise takes place 100 years before that. While in the Star Trek universe it would not be impossible for Archer to still be alive, I don't think the lifespan of a dog would be so greatly increased. Adam Bishop (talk) 05:12, 16 September 2009 (UTC)

Please see the cited source ([2]). --EEMIV (talk) 10:14, 16 September 2009 (UTC)
Ah! Completely missed that. Surely the dog was not Porthos, though. I guess he just liked beagles and had more than one. Adam Bishop (talk) 12:25, 16 September 2009 (UTC)

Franchise[edit]

"Franchise"? Really? Are we talking about a fast food chain or a TV show with movies modeled after it? If the latter, I suggest removing the term "franchise". 71.115.5.119 (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 04:46, 9 January 2010 (UTC).

Star Trek is a media franchise, just like Star Wars for example. Alastairward (talk) 22:51, 9 January 2010 (UTC)

Aberdeen Accent[edit]

Doohan may have claimed to have based Scotty's accent on an Aberdeen accent, but anyone who has actually heard an Aberdeen accent (which is very different to what most English speakers would recognize as Scots) will know that it shares no virtually no similarities with it. 91.106.226.28 (talk) 08:56, 16 March 2010 (UTC)

James Doohan had a thick Canadian accent. He did serve as a fighter pilot in WWII in England. He was well aware of Scots accents. In more than one television interview, and in life in general, when pressured about the accent, he always said that if he used a real Scots accent, no one (in America used to Ohio accents on tv) would understand him. As an American (Texan with full on drawl) who has been all over England, and a little into Ireland and Wales and got close to Scotland, let me assure you that he was right. I'm sure there must be a Doohan interview on youtube somewhere. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.43.18.19 (talk) 05:38, 31 December 2011 (UTC)