Talk:Morris Canal

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Untitled[edit]

At its greatest extent (usually meant as its length!) is inaccurate. The Morris Canal and its 2 feeder Canals totalled 110 miles. Its longest stretch without a lock or Inclined Plane was 17 miles. RonRice@writeme.com 18:39, 25 May 2006 (UTC) Ron Rice, CSNJ map archivist

Use after demise by canoeists ...[edit]

Drago writes that the State of New Jersey cut the banks draining the canal, destroyed the Little Falls aqueduct, in the years 1924-1926. Yet, Eric Sloane writes that "Long after the Morris Canal closed, New York canoe clubs used the route to paddle to Lake Hopatcong. Dozens of canoes might reach the end of the line at one time, filled with canoeists bronzed by the sun of fifty miles along the canal." Sloan, Eric (1955). p. 57. ISBN 0-345-24293-9-295 Check |isbn= value (help).  Unknown parameter |Title= ignored (|title= suggested) (help); Missing or empty |title= (help) Unfortunately Sloane does not give a reference for this information, which seems to be a little contradictory to what Drago writes. The Newark Subway opened in 1935, so that might be a latest date for these people canoeing.

Bonnachoven (talk) 18:59, 17 January 2014 (UTC)