Talk:Mosel (wine region)

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I'm pretty sure that the photo claiming to be the Ruwer, isn't[edit]

I've visited the Mosel many times, and have passed by the Ruwer on the bus several times, and, as the books say, it's more of a stream than a river. In August 2008 I actually visited several of the top vineyards on the Ruwer to take photos (you can see a picture of the Ruwer at http://www.germanwinesdirect.org/pictures/ruwer5.html , and all the parts of this river that I saw were about 2 metres wide or less, so, as I say, I'm pretty sure this isn't the Ruwer. A previous heading of the photo claimed it to be the Ruwer flowing into the Mosel, but the Mosel is a fairly large river, maybe 100 meters across or more. Not only that, but the maps (see The World Atlas Of Wine) show it as passing underneath a road at the point where it joins the Mosel. I lack the editing skills to remove the picture, but I do think it should be removed. Riverwood (talk) 18:24, 8 September 2008 (UTC)

Actually, checking closer in the information provided in Commons, the Image:Riveristalsperre.jpg is labelled Verbandsgemeinde Ruwer (some sort of district around Ruwer) and Riveristalsperre, perhaps easier to understand written Riveris-Tal-Sperre (Riveris-Valley-Blockade). There exists an article de:Riveristalsperre explaining that this is a dam on the river Riveris which is a tributary of Ruwer, so that explains why there's so much water in the image. Apparently it is used to provide Trier with drinking water rather than for wine production. So you're absolutely right - the location in the image has nothing to do with winemaking on the Ruwer. Therefore I changed it; I found another image of the Ruwer valley which looks more right. Tomas e (talk) 20:32, 8 September 2008 (UTC)
Thanks. This one I recognise! I also had a look on Wikimedia Commons and found several images of the Ruwer, including an excellent one of it flowing into the Mosel. You might like to use that one. Riverwood (talk) 17:19, 9 September 2008 (UTC)

Steepest vineyard[edit]

This 76° sloped vineyard (Calmont, in Ediger-Eller) can't be right. 76° implies that 1 m horizontal matches 4 m vertical displacement (tan 76° = 4.01). The German article de:Calmont says 65°, that's already quite steep (1 m horiz. = 2.1 m vert., tan 65° = 2.14). de:Ediger-Eller says 65% (1 m horiz. = 0.65 m vert.). Markussep Talk 13:02, 26 November 2007 (UTC)

Hmm, does the German article have a source? 76 is what the Wine Bible says at least twice. It's certainly a reliable source but I would take a German source as probably a little more reliable. AgneCheese/Wine 13:15, 26 November 2007 (UTC)

This site shows more detail: 56° = 148% average slope, and 65° = 215% maximum slope. I've seen the pictures, I believe the 65° now. It's not a scientific site, but it looks reliable. This site says no one really knows, could be something between 55 and 70°. Markussep Talk 13:46, 26 November 2007 (UTC)
And its called Bremmer Calmont; perhaps Ediger-Eller is closer, but vineyard-name-wise it's in Bremm. Tomas e (talk) 21:55, 27 November 2007 (UTC)


Having seen a photo of a grape-picker harvesting this vineyard I can well beleive the 76 degrees. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 149.254.192.195 (talk) 19:56, 21 January 2008 (UTC)

Wishlist Photo[edit]

I'd love to have a good photo a green hock bottle or really any Mosel wines. I'll probably make my own when I get my camera fixed but if anyone has some pics of their own I'll greatly appreciate it. AgneCheese/Wine 13:15, 26 November 2007 (UTC)

History section[edit]

The history section is a tad long and out of balanced with the rest of the article. It seems like there is enough fodder for a History of Mosel wine article (like the History of Rioja wine or History of Sherry) and turn this section into a summary. It will have to be a bit lower on more to-do list but it might be a worthwhile direction to take. AgneCheese/Wine 23:46, 17 February 2008 (UTC)

Surge in Popularity[edit]

Does anyone know of Mosel wine's surge in popularity around 1985? I used to buy it fairly cheaply. I told some friends about it, and they loved it, but about 6 months later, the price shot way up. The wine store said it was getting popular. I doubt my telling friends about it was a noticeable factor, unless there were thousands of other Americans doing the same thing at the same time. Bostoner (talk) 05:11, 12 April 2011 (UTC)