Talk:Mount Blackburn

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Global warming comment[edit]

The following unsigned comment was added to the page itself, so I'll put it here on the talk page. -- Spireguy 20:58, 4 February 2007 (UTC)

Although global warming has been imperically proven to be true in theory and reality, the last sentence of your definition seems inadequate. Global warming has not and will most likely not be an impetus behind change in route of a given approach or climb. That is simply too broad a defintion. For instance, if you are referring to global warming causing the melting of a neccessary snow bridge, ice vein or fluting, then it would be more appropriate to consider saying that the route simple had melted out. Short of a geologic episode (like an earthquake) that can we quantified by scientific measure and has been recorded as such, it is inappropriate to attribute and mountaineering route change to the effects of global warming without more in depth reasoning and explanation. -- (Unsigned)
Point well taken. I responded by deleting the assertion about the current state of the East Face route entirely, since I can't find a reference to it in my sources. If anyone wants to put in a better-sourced description of that route and what condition it is in, feel free. -- Spireguy 20:58, 4 February 2007 (UTC)

I also did some cleanup and additions to the rest of the article. I did leave in some language that may still be a little POV without better support, e.g. "heady exploit," but IMO it's OK. -- Spireguy 20:58, 4 February 2007 (UTC)

We have a problem . . .[edit]

I have just discovered that the original version of this article from 21:24, 27 November 2004 by L Durnan [1] was copied verbatim from a page on Gerry Roach's website: Alaska’s Summits 13,000 feet and above, see notes 10 & 11 at the bottom. So we have to delete those parts of the article, or rewrite them completely and reference a source properly. This text is in paragraphs 4 & 5 of the current article, and included the "global warming" comment referred to above.

Unless someone wants to rewrite those paragraphs, I'm going to delete them completely. Then I'll write some new, much briefer replacement text about the two summits.

I guess the bold Wikipedia warning, "Do not copy text from other websites without permission. It will be deleted" may actually be true, eventually. Sometimes it just takes 2 1/2 years for someone to actually delete it. --Seattle Skier 03:34, 11 March 2007 (UTC)

That's too bad. However you don't have to completely delete the information. Instead use it as a source (I would say Roach's site is pretty decent as a verifiable source, although not ideal perhaps) and rewrite the most important parts of the info. Of course more sources are better, and you don't want to just paraphrase. But I can certainly add some from other sources once you put in a basic replacement. Or I can do the replacement to start off. -- Spireguy 02:38, 12 March 2007 (UTC)
I'd be happy if you do it, as I'm working on other areas right now. I'll look at this article again in a few days (or sooner). Thanks. --Seattle Skier 01:33, 13 March 2007 (UTC)