Talk:Mountain peaks of the United States

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Shorten article[edit]

It seems this article uses the same data for each table, could this article be shortened by making one table with new columns for each different rank; prominent peaks, isolated peaks, and eminent peaks? --IMandIR 22:48, 27 September 2007 (UTC)

Each of the four tables contains the top ranking peaks by its selection criteria. Each of the four tables contains a different selection of peaks. --Buaidh 02:47, 29 September 2007 (UTC)
This article has been shortened to three tables and 168 kilobytes. I don't think it would be a good idea to split it up. What do you think? --Buaidh (talk) 21:47, 29 February 2008 (UTC)
I have shorten this article to 88 kilobytes in length.
I have also created three new articles:
  1. Highest mountain peaks of the United States
  2. Most prominent mountain peaks of the United States
  3. Most isolated mountain peaks of the United States
--Buaidh (talk) 21:49, 11 March 2008 (UTC)

Proposed changes[edit]

The elevation of Mount Neacola is overstated. The USGS 1:63,360 map indicates the summit elevation is between 9300 and 9400 feet. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.67.106.181 (talk) 18:42, 25 August 2009 (UTC)

The above was posted by Steve Gruhn sgruhn@clarus-ak.com —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.67.106.181 (talk) 19:10, 25 August 2009 (UTC)

The most isolated peaks list omits several likely candidates in Alaska - Attu Mountain on Attu Island, the highpoint of Hall Island, etc. It appears that someone has not done a thorough job of research before posting the list. Steve Gruhn.

Wheeler Peak[edit]

I corrected the hight of Wheeler Peak. It should not even be in the top 50.

This article has not included Kings Peak is Utah which stands at 13,528. This is easily verified at www.summitpost.org/kings-peak/150376. Further Kings Peak has its own Wiki page and bibliography. This would increase the accuracy of this article.

Thank you — Preceding unsigned comment added by Victor2112 (talkcontribs) 12:20, 27 February 2013 (UTC)