Talk:Mouthfeel

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This article is completely insane. I think the word the author was looking for is, "texture." Without citations that any English speaker uses this term, I am inclined to believe that what we are looking at is a literal translation of yet another German compound word in the vein of Schadenfreude. Except that we have a word with the same meaning, and that word is, "texture."

I think it's a recognised specialist term to do with texture in food and drink. There doesn't seem to be a consensus on whether it's "mouthfeel" or "mouth feel" - the second gets more Google results, but some are misleading because they're for things like "why do breath mints make my mouth feel cool?" This page: http://www.foodproductdesign.com/archive/1993/0893QA.html might be a place to start. Jodievdw 00:02, 7 July 2007 (UTC)
The link is well dead and their archive beginns with the 1.1.1994. Does anybody still have the 'Starter'? DrJunge —Preceding comment was added at 12:28, 27 December 2007 (UTC)
Just to add in my own $0.02, "mouthfeel" is a word commonly used throughout both research and industry involving the chemical senses, not just a poor literal translation. Smirkster 14:17, 11 October 2007 (UTC)

That sounds an awful lot like like Newspeak. 76.180.120.161 12:56, 29 August 2007 (UTC)

DietCoke doubleplusungood mouthfeel. :D 75.111.32.40 18:17, 16 September 2007 (UTC)
This word has an ungood earfeel. It's simply an ugly expression. It's nauseating. However, it seems to have been around since 1999 or earlier, when the folks who maintain the Oxford English Dictionary recognized it as an Americanism.: http://articles.sfgate.com/1999-01-03/news/28594206_1. 24.27.31.170 (talk) 04:38, 16 July 2011 (UTC) Eric

Whowhatwherewhenhowwhy[edit]

As a professional wine taster myself I must say I have never heard "mouthfeel" before this article. I have only ever used "Texture" and only ever heard it. Is this a new term or something? As an English word it certanly sounds odd. Plus it is not in any of my dictionaries, But then again they are all very old... like, from 2007 :O 210.185.8.206 (talk) 04:59, 18 December 2009 (UTC)

That's rather surprising. While this article is on my "hit list" to eventually clean up and expand, I certainly won't have any shortage of wine-related reliable sources that talk about mouthfeel. It is featured in the Oxford Companion (2006), Jancis Robinson's Wine Course (2003), Katherine MacNeil's Wine Bible (2001), Andre Domine's Wine (2008) and Sotheby's Wine Encyclopedia (2005) among several other books. While I haven't gone through the WSET path yet, as a wine educator who got her training through the Society of Wine Educators and the Court of Master Sommeliers, I can say the term "mouthfeel" is definitely not foreign in discussing wine tasting and critical evaluations of wine. In some extent it maybe interchangeable with the term "texture" but usually includes more focus on overall balance. But again, this article does need some work. AgneCheese/Wine 05:37, 18 December 2009 (UTC)

Sounds to me like a pretentious use of a phrase to make people think you know more than they do. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 184.77.232.137 (talk) 06:10, 15 December 2010 (UTC)

Regardless of your perception of the term, it is a well-established word in the fields of wine tasting and beer tasting, as well as other culinary areas of discourse.76.4.0.8 (talk) 15:25, 25 June 2011 (UTC)
Though it is a term used by *some* wine tasters (though not all, based on the above comment from a wine taster) and people in culinary settings (I hear it a lot on cooking shows like Top Chef, for instance), it definitely seems like a Buzzword, rather than a term that actually defines or elucidates a concept or idea. Even if it is somewhat useful, it seems at *best* like a term used by some insiders. Perhaps a useful example of a similar case is the word 'crumb', which to some bakers means the bread that resides within the crust -- while to the rest of us, a crumb is a bit of bread that has detached from the rest of the loaf. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bread#the_crumb In either case, I do not believe this term/buzzword warrants its own page on Wikipedia. Should we consider it for deletion? Jreedy21 (talk) 01:32, 14 June 2012 (UTC)jreedy21