Talk:Mughal Empire

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Explaining edits on the Mughal Empire[edit]

Regarding the history of the Mughal Empire i have made sure to present the different phases of the empire and the complexties associated with those phases, the Taj Mahal is an important monument created by the mughal empire and deserves attention so is the Urdu language. There are names of various royals who claimed to be monarchs or whose names were later omitted from the Mughal records and are not recognized as emperors even by historians such as H.G Keeene. Furthermore i have added respective pictures of the daily lives of the people who lived in the mughal empire in the gallery section of the article.--468SM (talk) 20:19, 30 December 2014 (UTC)

None of that has anything to do with your unsourced changes to the second paragraph to the lead where you cut out well sourced information and added in POV and unencyclopedic language with poor English eg "The Mughal Empire became known for it's (sic) brutality towards the peasants under its rule." "Social groups in northern and western India, such as the Marathas, the Rajputs, and the Sikhs, were persecuted, and often violence estewed (Sic) from this." DeCausa (talk) 20:28, 30 December 2014 (UTC)

Horde[edit]

Urdu, Orda, Horde (camp in Mongolian and Turkic) 468SM (talk) 20:15, 19 December 2014 (UTC)

name of Mughal[edit]

please someone tell me if the primary medieval sources & chronicles has noted the 'Mughal sultans addressing themselves and their empire formally as 'Mughal'. is it realy they officially named themselves as Mughals? or its just the general consensus or rule of thumbs from modern historians to say that this empire as 'Mughal'?

for as far as i know the real 'Mughal' is derived from 'Mongol' and the first sultan Babur was distancing himself from 'Mongol' identity. they even leave behind the identity and instead fully embrace the authority of Sultanate, according to Sultanate Emirate authority. unlike Timur who is clearly still embracing the mongol custom and authority Ahendra (talk) 22:45, 12 February 2015 (UTC)

According to the book "The Empire of the Great Mughals: History, Art and Culture" (page 15), the Mughals called themselves The House of Timur. However, even during the first half of the 19th century, when the Mughal Empire still existed, the empire was already called "Mogul" by (at least some) English speakers. See for instance the book "Debate at the East-India House" (page 130) published in 1845. --Evecurid (talk) 03:18, 15 February 2015 (UTC)
Thank you for giving comprehensive answer regarding this matter. im just thinking probably the official naming regarding this empire should be highlighted somewhere =Ahendra (talk) 18:21, 3 March 2015 (UTC)

Should there be an inclusion of Mongolian language and references to this article? even Mughal in classical Mongolian script? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 60.242.81.170 (talk) 02:25, 24 March 2015 (UTC)

Mughals were Persianate Turko-Mongol people based in India. The inclusion of some form of Mongolian language (not necessarily the classical Mongolian script though) may be fine, although I am not quite sure. --Evecurid (talk) 02:35, 24 March 2015 (UTC)

The size of Mughal Empire vs Maurya Empire[edit]

From the map of the Mughal Empire (File:Mughal_Historical_Map.png) and the map of the Maurya Empire (File:Maurya_Empire,_c.250_BCE_2.png) in the infobox, it seems that the Mughal Empire was larger than the Maurya Empire at their maximum extent, since their northern borders as shown in the maps are very similar, and the Mughal Empire also reached further south than the Maurya Empire in their southern borders. But how come the Maurya Empire article states the Maurya Empire was "the largest ever in the Indian subcontinent", and the area listed in its infobox is also significant larger than the area listed in this article? I believe there is something wrong either in at least one of the maps, or in at least one of the areas listed for the empires. --Evecurid (talk) 18:07, 21 February 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 27 February 2015[edit]

The sentence "End of Mughal Dynsasty" at the end of the list of Mughal emperors does not make any grammatical sense. Please change it to "This is the end of the Mughal Dynasty" or something similar. Chaomaster5522 (talk) 08:05, 27 February 2015 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done Pishcal 18:07, 27 February 2015 (UTC)

Flag inaccuracy[edit]

Flag of the Mughal Empire.svg

Discussion at Talk:Flag of the Mughal Empire#Fictional flags redux over the flag. -Ugog Nizdast (talk) 19:11, 27 February 2015 (UTC)

WikiProject Assessment for B class[edit]

(Criteria per WP:BCLASS)

The main issue for this to fail B class is the article structure, particularly the lead section. The entire article needs to be rearranged more uniformly into consistent paras, subsections and main sections. The lead should better summarise the rest of the article, currently it's just too long and inline citations are usually not necessary. Once that is addressed, we can check it against the rest of the criteria. -Ugog Nizdast (talk) 07:47, 28 February 2015 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done.Ghatus (talk) 10:29, 24 March 2015 (UTC)

Indo-Persianate[edit]

Per Rarevogel's latest attempt to remove references and referenced information, without the use of discussion or consensus, stated this in the his edit summary, "Persian culture is not what defined the empire".

  • "Culture and Circulation: Literature in Motion in Early Modern India", by Thomas De Bruijn and Allison Busch, page 104, "And yet underlying this cosmopolitanism was a sense of hierarchy that held Persianate culture as the most preeminent in the eyes of the majority of the Mughal elite. The superiority attached to the Persianate episteme is an aspect that must not be overlooked..."
  • "The Oxford History of Islam", ed. John Esposito, page 422,"Unlike the Delhi Sultanate or the Mughal empire, which shaped the Turko-Persianate tradition of the Indian subcontinent...."
  • "Universal Empire: A Comparative Approach to Imperial Culture and Representation in Eurasian History", ed. Peter Fibiger Bang, Dariusz Kolodziejczyk, page 208, "Shah Jahan recreated the multi-pillared halls of Persepolis in his audience halls, where Nauruz, the Persian New Year, was merged with Julus, his accession day, and celebrated as one of the great Mughal court festivals. Hardly anywhere else in the Persianate world was it celebrated with such splendour." ~~ Adoption of Persian culture.
  • "Turko-Persia in Historical Perspective", ed. Robert L. Canfield, page 20, "The Mughals - Persianized Turks who had invaded from Central Asia and claimed descent from both Timur and Genghis - strengthened the Persianate culture of Muslim India. They cultivated the arts (literary works, book production, artistic illustration, architecture) in the Persianate style, enticing to their courts Persian artists and architects from Bukhara, Tabriz, Shiraz, and other cities of the Iranian plateau; the Taj Mahal, commissioned by the Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan, was indebted to the Persian style."
  • "Turko-Persia in Historical Perspective", ed. Robert L. Canfield, page 87, "The suffocation felt as a result of excessive religious observances led many writers and poets to seek shelter and more freedom outside Iran...At the same time, many Iranian poets fled to the Mughal courts of Babur, Akbar, and Humayun, where a new style of Persian poetry, the so-called sabk-i Hindi, was developed."
  • "Literary Cultures in History: Reconstructions from South Asia", ed. Sheldon I. Pollock, page 158, "Yet later, under the Mughals, India was to witness it most productive--perhaps even incomparable--efflorescence of Persian literary culture. Indeed, Mughal literary culture has been celebrated primarily, if not exclusively, for it extraordinary excellence in Persian poetry and prose."
  • "Literacy in the Persianate World: Writing and the Social Order", ed. Brian Spooner, William L. Hanaway, page 330, "Under the influence and patronage of the imperial Mughals, Persian language and Indo-Persian culture rose further in prominence and extent across northern and central India.[...] Indeed many Persians were specifically recruited by Mughal imperial envoys bearing lucrative offers of patronage."

I believe these sources tell a different story. --Kansas Bear (talk) 19:52, 21 March 2015 (UTC)