Talk:Multivariate t-distribution

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Statistics (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon

This article is within the scope of the WikiProject Statistics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of statistics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page or join the discussion.

Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the importance scale.
 

what is p[edit]

What is p? Is it the dimension of \Sigma? Albmont 20:07, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

Added a comment to effect that p is the dimension Shaww 09:54, 19 April 2007 (UTC)

normalization[edit]

The bivariate student distribution density function with zero correlation is presented as

f(t_i) = \frac{1}{2\pi} (1+(t_1^2 + t_2^2)/n)^{-(n+2)/2}.

But this does not normalize nicely to 1.

\int_{-\infty}^{\infty} \int_{-\infty}^{\infty}  f(t_1,t_2)\,dt_1\,dt_2  ≠1

for any n. Only for high n it seems to go to 1.

Where is the (my) mistake?

jasper (talk) 17:06, 21 January 2008 (UTC)

A rough numerical integration with Matlab seem₫s to give an ok normalization to one:
>> p = inline('(1+(x^2+y^2)/n)^( -(n+2)/2 )/(2*pi)')
>> s=0; n=2; for x=-20:0.1:20, for y=-20:0.1:20, s=s+p(n,x,y);end,end,s
the result 99.5946 is approximately 100x0.1x0.1=1. fnielsen (talk) 10:12, 22 January 2008 (UTC)

Sorry, my mistake, fnielsen is right. My infinity was not big enough. Should I delete this entry in the discussion tab? jasper (talk) 16:51, 22 January 2008 (UTC)

I don't think you should delete; errors are good when we learn from them. Now, do the homework: prove analytically that the integral is one: replace t1 = r \cos \theta , t2 = r \sin \theta \, and see what happens :-) Albmont (talk) 13:50, 1 February 2008 (UTC)

This article refers to elliptical distribution theory. I'd like to see a separate article about elliptical distributions. Duoduoduo (talk) 20:01, 11 March 2010 (UTC)