Talk:Munda languages

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject India (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject India, which aims to improve Wikipedia's coverage of India-related topics. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
Note icon
This article was last assessed in April 2012.
WikiProject Languages (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Languages, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of standardized, informative and easy-to-use resources about languages on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

The 16 or so Munda languages are all spoken in India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh. Most scholars classify them as a language family within the Austroasiatic stock. Santhali is the Munda language with the greatest number of speakers (a few million); Mundari, Ho, Sora, Kharia, and Korku have significantly fewer speakers. Some scholars include Nahali, spoken by a few thousand people in southwestern Madhya Pradesh, among the Munda languages. Khasi, spoken in Assam, Meghalaya, and a number of other Indian states, is a member of the Mon-Khmer language family. See Austroasiatic languages

(Actually, none of them are spoken in Pakistan.)


From a dup, possibly useful:

"The Munda languages are spoken in West Bengal, Bihar, Orissa and Madhya Pradesh, India. Together with the Mon-Khmer languages, they form the Austro-Asiatic phylum. The main branches are:

Juang, Bhumij, Korva and Ho,

  • Sora and Gutob
  • Kurku

Altogether speakers number several millions but they are without a linguistic state, in contrast to, for example, Hindi, Dravidian and Tibeto-Burmese speakers in Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Mizoram respectively. The Munda languages are thought to be the most ancient linguistic stratum of India, ante-dating even Dravidian. Their relationship to the Mon-Khmer languages is remote."

Stan 06:10, 8 Jun 2004 (UTC)

Added reference to we-exclusive from http://bibleocean.com/OmniDefinition/Inclusive_we J S Ayer 01:36, 10 September 2005 (UTC)

Sprachbund[edit]

Do we have a Sprachbund with IE and Dravid.? ~ Dpr 05:12, 22 Jun 2005 (UTC) Munda language has quite a few similarity with the Japanese (Nihogo )vocablary