Talk:Munda languages

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The 16 or so Munda languages are all spoken in India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh. Most scholars classify them as a language family within the Austroasiatic stock. Santhali is the Munda language with the greatest number of speakers (a few million); Mundari, Ho, Sora, Kharia, and Korku have significantly fewer speakers. Some scholars include Nahali, spoken by a few thousand people in southwestern Madhya Pradesh, among the Munda languages. Khasi, spoken in Assam, Meghalaya, and a number of other Indian states, is a member of the Mon-Khmer language family. See Austroasiatic languages

(Actually, none of them are spoken in Pakistan.)


From a dup, possibly useful:

"The Munda languages are spoken in West Bengal, Bihar, Orissa and Madhya Pradesh, India. Together with the Mon-Khmer languages, they form the Austro-Asiatic phylum. The main branches are:

Juang, Bhumij, Korva and Ho,

  • Sora and Gutob
  • Kurku

Altogether speakers number several millions but they are without a linguistic state, in contrast to, for example, Hindi, Dravidian and Tibeto-Burmese speakers in Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Mizoram respectively. The Munda languages are thought to be the most ancient linguistic stratum of India, ante-dating even Dravidian. Their relationship to the Mon-Khmer languages is remote."

Stan 06:10, 8 Jun 2004 (UTC)

Added reference to we-exclusive from http://bibleocean.com/OmniDefinition/Inclusive_we J S Ayer 01:36, 10 September 2005 (UTC)

Sprachbund[edit]

Do we have a Sprachbund with IE and Dravid.? ~ Dpr 05:12, 22 Jun 2005 (UTC) Munda language has quite a few similarity with the Japanese (Nihogo )vocablary

Classification[edit]

The Classification section says that "Munda consists of five uncontroversial branches. However, their interrelationship is debated.". Despite that the uncontroversial branches should be the default classification (e.g. in the infoboxes), these five branches cannot be unambiguously identified in that section or anywhere else in the article. Does anyone know which these are? --JorisvS (talk) 11:58, 30 November 2014 (UTC)