Talk:Nags Head, North Carolina

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Merger[edit]

I suggest merging Nags Head, North Carolina and Nags Head into one article. To me, it seems fairly straightforward - the two articles are about the same topic, and therefore they should be merged. I strongly suggest using the "Nags Head, North Carolina" name as the "destination" article, since it is a more complete name. Thoughts? SchuminWeb (Talk) 05:51, 26 April 2007 (UTC)

I agree. -Will Beback · · 06:04, 26 April 2007 (UTC)
I agree as well - the info is rather sparse, and will benefit from merging. Terren Peterson · Talk) · 20:24, 12 May 2007 (UTC)
I agree 66.245.192.131 18:21, 4 June 2007 (UTC)
I agree Vbofficial 02:42, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

I believe it would best be merged with the Outer Banks article. The information in the Nags Head article would be an appropriate addition, perhaps in a section on History or Geographical Features in the Outer Banks article. Nags Head is a more general geographic location than Nags Head, North Carolina --RHJ 20:14, 27 June 2007 (UTC)

UPDATE: Nags Head now redirects to Nags Head, North Carolina. --Andrew from NC (talk) 03:53, 5 July 2008 (UTC)

Removed content - unsourced tales.[edit]

Preserving this for posterity:

Tales of land pirates who used mules, nags, with lanterns tied to their necks to lure ships ashore in stormy weather may be the possible origin of the town's name. Or it may have been carried across the sea by English explorers who were reminded of a similar location of the English coast, a high point on the Isles of Scilly, the last sight of old England that the earlier explorers were to see on their voyage to the New World.

Long unsourced, if real it should surely be possible to source it to a local paper or history or even the town's formal website under wp:SELFPUB. But it is a good story and I hate to see it lost.- Sinneed 21:09, 4 May 2010 (UTC)

This was re-added. I dropped it again, and flagged the smaller bit that remained.- Sinneed 21:19, 12 May 2010 (UTC)