Talk:Disappearance of Natalee Holloway

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Amigoe section, BLP sourcing[edit]

Despite a very lengthy period of being tagged for inadequate sourcing the section still does not meet the burden for sourcing contentious information about living people, ie multiple reliable sources. Wikipedia:Biographies of living persons "In cases where the appropriateness of material regarding a living person is questioned, the rule of thumb should be "do no harm." The FA status neither here nor there. As it is contentious throughout and only has one source, there is not sufficient sourcing. So the section needs to be removed now.Overagainst (talk) 20:51, 30 May 2014 (UTC)

Thanks for misrepresenting the situation so thoroughly. It makes it easier to be blunt in response. There's nothing wrong with the section. Your tag for inadequate sourcing has been addressed and removed. That you constantly edit-war it back into existence doesn't make it more valid.
It has been discussed with you to absurd lengths: [1][2]. The section was heavily edited to address the few issues where it was at least conceivable that you had a legitimate point. The article survived yet another FAR while the section you object to was intact and tagged with that false tag that you persistently edit war into existence. Your edits have gone past tendentious to disruptive.—Kww(talk) 19:52, 13 July 2014 (UTC)
Quote from article: "However, they found that Jug Twitty had already been to the area, spreading "a lot of uproar and panic in the direct vicinity", and nothing could be accomplished." As the subject of that accusation is a living person it ought to be made clear (by use within the sentence of 'according to Renfro' or 'Renfro said') that the aforementioned is not in Wikipedia's voice. If Renfro's account is reproduced, it will be relevant to mention that, according to Vanity Fair, Renfro became involved in an acrimonious dispute with Natalee's parents that included claims by Renfro that she had been assaulted. We can't give a contentious account about named living people without mentioning that the neutrality of the account being quoted is a matter of dispute. ("She's a witch")-Overagainst (talk) 17:40, 18 October 2014 (UTC)

MWWS in the lede[edit]

The lede now very prominently referring to the case having been cited as proving Missing White Women Syndrome. Actually it was the media that didn't cover the NH case that much at all that said there was MWWS, and they were targeting their rivals. It may be of interest that "The actual phrase (Missing white woman syndrome) comes from Sheri Parks, an associate professor at the University of Maryland, who used the term in a 2006 interview with CNN to describe this observed media trend.[1][3]"

The WWS seems to have come to prominence through CNN running criticism of FOX ect who had trounced them in the ratings by running the Natalee Holloway story. Anderson Cooper spoke about this. If you read the source, Cooper explicitly says (see the ref that these are his are his employer's competitors. "COOPER: every night, our cable competitors devote hours and hours to this story, even though, sadly, nothing new is happening. We decided to start tracking their coverage, because to be honest, it's getting downright ridiculous. Here's what the other guys were reporting just last night." They were playing hardball with GRETA VAN SUSTEREN. Who was getting huge ratings for her coverage of Natalee's disappearance. So an academic got given a platform by CNN to accuse their rivals of discreditable behaviour to get the big ratings. Anyway, I don't think that thing added to the lede belongs there.Overagainst (talk) 14:54, 1 November 2014 (UTC)

It absolutely belongs. This case is one of the most routinely referenced disappearances when MWWS is discussed. In no way is this a situation of one media outlet attempting to gain ratings by trashing another.
  • "...the cable-news media received scrutiny for devoting so much time to the disappearance of one pretty, white young woman from an affluent suburb when similar attention was rarely, if ever, paid to the lost, mistreated children of the urban underclass."
    Ginia Bellafante (2011-05-08). "The Mystery That Won't Go Away". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-04-18. 
  • "Many critics have questioned why the story of the disappearance deserves blanket coverage. Some have deplored the emphasis on white women who go missing, while missing women of other ethnic groups are ignored. One critic, Matthew Felling of the Center for Media and Public Affairs, told The Associated Press that the Holloway coverage amounted to "emotional pornography."
    Bill Carter (2005-08-24). "Bob Costas Says No to Hour on Aruba". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-04-18. 
  • "ALL suspected murders are appalling tragedies for the families of the victims, but only a few become media circuses. To qualify, it helps if the victim is young, white, female and beautiful. That is the case with Natalee Holloway, an 18-year-old who vanished on May 30th on the last night of a high-school trip to the Caribbean island of Aruba."
    "Murder and the media mob: A tragedy in Aruba brings an invasion". The Economist 376 (8434): 31. 2005-07-07. 
  • "This excessive attention to particular stories is glaringly evident in the saturated coverage of missing white women, like Laci Peterson, Chadra Levy, Natalee Holloway, Stacy Peterson, and other white women who have tragically disappeared."
  • "...MWWS percolated to the public consciousness during the intense media coverage of Natalee Holloway..."
    Charles Gallagher and Cameron D. Lippard (2014-06-24). "Race and Racism in the United States: An Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic". Greenwood. p. 800. ISBN 978-1440803451.  |chapter= ignored (help)
  • Full article about the concept
    Robinson, Eugene (2005-06-10). "(White) Women We Love". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2014-11-01. 
  • "Critics' outcry about media bias grew louder in 2005 during the media blitz about Natalee Holloway, a pretty blond teen who had disappeared in Aruba."
    "Missing White Girl Syndrome". Jornalism Center on Children & Families. Retrieved 2014-11-01. 
  • As example of MWWS: "After all, disappearances like those involving Natalee Holloway, Lauren Spierer and Holly Bobo get splashed across the headlines and are the focus of morning talk and true crime shows"
    Robin L. Barton (2011-08-22). "The "Missing White Woman Syndrome"". Retrieved 2014-11-01. 
  • Full article
    Anne-Marie O'Connor. "Not only Natalee is missing". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2014-11-01. 
"Natalee Holloway, who disappeared in Aruba in 2005, fits into that description. Her case sparked heavy debate over the Missing White Woman Syndrome.”
  • Kristen McDaniel (2010-05-05). "If you're missing, it's better to be white". Retrieved 2014-11-01. 
  • "The phenomenon, known as "Missing White Woman Syndrome," is particularly noticeable at the television network news level. Think about it. Who hasn't heard names such as Natalee Holloway, Caylee Anthony, Robyn Gardner, Elizabeth Smart or Jaycee Duggard?"
    Ava Thompson Greenwell (2012-01-20). "What's Missing From Television Coverage of Missing Persons?". Retrieved 2014-11-01. 
  • "The discrepance has come to be referred to as the missing white woman syndrom. Essence magazine and other media outlets have noted how mainstream news programs such as CNN devote hours, days, and even weeks of coverage to cases that feature a missing white girl or woman. The examples are seemingly endless: Laci Peterson, Natalee Holloway..."
    Stephanie Brzuzy and Amy Lind (2007-12-30). "Crime and Criminalization". Battleground: Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Greenwood. p. 106. ISBN 978-0313340376. 
  • "Some cynics have labeled the coverage Missing White Woman Syndrome, nothing that many individuals who are poor, minority, gay, or unattractive go missing all the time, with barely a peep from the media. Clearly, there's a double standard...We have to look at ourselves and ask, Why are we so interested in the Natalee Holloway case, as opposed to a disappearance in South Central Los Angeles..."
    Jane Velez-Mitchell (2008-06-10). "Secrets Can Be Murder: The Killer Next Door". Touchstone. p. 302. ISBN 978-0743299374.  |chapter= ignored (help)
  • "The case of Natalee Holloway is indicative of MWGS [missing white girl syndrome] in that international media attention became focused on the plight of a single, Causcasian, pretty youth."
    Christopher J Ferguson (2013-03-29). "How Does the News Media Portray Crime?". Adolescents, Crime, and the Media: A Critical Analysis. Springer. ISBN 978-1461467403. 
  • "The sad trajectory of the case mirrors that of the increasingly bitter relations between Holloway's parents and the people of Aruba, arcing downward from the moment two years ago when islanders took the tragedy to heart and joined in the hunt by the thousands to today, when locals mutter about American media distortions and missing white woman syndrome."
  • "Although leads have faltered and investigators no longer seem to be focusing on the three named suspects, the case of the "missing white woman" promises to live on for years, at least in the legal TV and unsolved-mystery broadcasts."
    Carol J. Williams (2007-06-04). "In Holloway case, Aruba also suffers". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2014-11-01. 

I could list dozens more. --auburnpilot talk 03:29, 2 November 2014 (UTC)

"which has been criticized in some circles as proving correct the missing white woman syndrome theory." That is to put the cart before the horse as the theory was mainly in response to the publicity about the case. Moreover, your examples relating NH to MWWS are very much of their time, because at the time that was being said the case was indeed a missing person case, and the lead investigator specifically said Aruba police did not think there had been foul play. The case appears in a very different light now. Overagainst (talk) 18:24, 8 November 2014 (UTC)

change article name[edit]

I vouch that we change page's name to Murder of Natalee Holloway. I mean, shes been legally considered dead for years, and those familiar with the case know the sociopath Joran van der Sloot knows things about Natalee only her killer would know — Preceding unsigned comment added by 172.56.27.105 (talk) 16:37, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

The problem is, there really is no reliable sourcing for this. For all we know, she could have died of a drug overdose and he hid the body. Clearly he knows something more than what he's saying, but there just isn't enough to justify that change, imo. Bali88 (talk) 17:03, 8 January 2015 (UTC)

second film[edit]

Dont see why we cant add more details on the sequel, Justice for Natalee Holloway. anyone agree with me? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 172.56.27.105 (talk) 16:44, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

Why would we do that?—Kww(talk) 17:31, 8 January 2015 (UTC)