Talk:National Gendarmerie

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Untitled[edit]

This page needs a different picture as it shows the channel islands as part of the National Gendarmerie authority when they are not. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.195.254.9 (talk) 17:10, 15 March 2009 (UTC)


What are those fruit shaped things on their hats and uniforms?!?![edit]

Officer Crabtree from Allo Allo has one on his hat and uniform, and it has leaves on the top! Or is it supposed to be an explosive? (Curvebill 04:20, 24 February 2007 (UTC))

It's called a grenade, it's usually a symbol for infantry. The italian carabinieri have it as well, so do the coldstream guards in England. Not sure where it comes from though... Saebhiar
Close, but no cigar. It is called a "grenade" or sometimes just "bomb" although it is not the symbol for infantry, but rather for "Grenadiers" which is an elite type of heavy infantry. Infantry as a body is usually symbolized by crossed swords or rifles depending on country

V. Joe 02:20, 26 February 2007 (UTC)

Looks like we're both right. Infantries in France, Spain, Italy and most South American countries use the grenade as their symbol. Just because Commonwealth and US armies don't use it doesn't mean I'm wrong. :-) Besides, I did my military service in the French Gendarmerie so uh well... As a matter of interest if you look at the flames on the grenade they are made to look as antlers as Gendarmerie was mainly a rural police force back then. Saebhiar Adishatz 09:32, 26 February 2007 (UTC)
Sort of. U.S. troops (Marines, Soldiers or Sailors) don't use the grenade as a symbol at all, for either heavy infantry or light infantry, nor for other branches that handle explosives (i.e. Combat Engineers or Navy Seaborne Engineers) V. Joe 15:20, 26 February 2007 (UTC)
AND, to add fuel to the fire, in the USA, the infantry used to wear a bugle as its symbol.--68.80.207.22 00:38, 9 March 2007 (UTC)
AND AND the Grenade IS used by the US Army's Ordnance Corps--71.242.127.31 15:58, 28 August 2007 (UTC)

Legions of Gendarmerie renamed Regions[edit]

Since the territorial reorganisation of the Gendarmerie (1st July 2005), the 'legions' no longer exist and have been renamed 'regions'. (user : jlcavey from fr.wikipedia.com 81.67.45.88 15:36, 15 June 2007 (UTC))

Legal Authority section[edit]

"In 2002, in accordance with commitments entered into by Jacques Chirac at the time of her countryside for the presidential election of 2002, the forces of gendarmerie were attached to the ministry for the interior for their missions of interior safety. The gendarmes continued however to raise of the military statute. The brigades were reorganized in communities of brigades to the broader sphere of activity. The Law of orientation and programming for interior safety also took part in a new distribution of the forces of gendarmerie and police force in France."

This section appears to have been machine-translated; I've tried re-writing the paragraph but there are a few places where I just had to guess that it meant, so it's a bit vague and may not be accurate. Phonemonkey 13:11, 24 September 2007 (UTC)

faces[edit]

why are their faces blacked-out or pixelated?209.129.168.31 22:48, 3 October 2007 (UTC)

because they're soldiers, simply.. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 195.98.228.10 (talk) 13:01, 3 June 2009 (UTC)

Not sure about this answer. France has very strict privacy laws in respect to publish photographs. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 213.201.188.102 (talk) 12:15, 6 July 2009 (UTC)

History during World Wars[edit]

Article contains no reference to their history during WW1 & WW2, as well as service under Vichy regime —Preceding unsigned comment added by 81.149.2.208 (talk) 13:36, 14 July 2010 (UTC)