Talk:National Patriots' Day

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I've tried to clean this article up a bit, and make it more understandable for non-Canadians, but I may have got a fact or two wrong. Please edit if I have. Kevintoronto 17:06, 28 Feb 2005 (UTC)

Some precisions?... A new text, asking for feedbacks and suggestions. Please correct typos and spelling before I publish it...[edit]

Pointing out the particular efforts of enlightened democrats, from Daniel Tracy to John Neilson, from Armury Girod to Louis-Joseph Papineau, on Sunday 24th of november Prime Minister Bernard Landry declared "This holiday will underline the 1837-1838 Patriots fight for the recognition of our people, for its political freedom and its access to a democratic system of government"

Assemblies of the Patriots: democracy vs monarchy, the recognition of a historical corner stone for a democratic Canadian Nation

These assemblies were in fact answers to the ten resolutions of Sir John Russell, voted in London on March 6, 1837, resolutions which opposed the three "patriotic" principal demands: no to the budget control by elected officials, no to the election of ministers, no to a responsible government. These resolutions were the first response after 20 years of complaints from Quebec's population, and it's shingling. The news of the diktat crosses the Atlantic like a hurricane and the assemblies known as anti-coercive assemblies will engage like a tidal wave.

Thousands of people will then gather at Saint-Ours (Richelieu) as of on Sunday May 7, to denounce the Russell Resolutions, and particularly to call for the boycotting of English products and to encourage the people into resistance. Next Monday, on May 15, 1837, not less than three assemblies are held in Quebec, Saint-Marc (Verchères), and especially at Saint-Laurent (Montreal) where Louis-Joseph Papineau announces that “the new circumstance are that the British Parliament makes its stance against us since its persecuting government rejects all and each requested reform. […] From now on, all English colonies have all the reasons to advance the urge hour of their separation, and it's necessary that sooner or later we're ready to take what the iron fist of power wants to tear off us”.

Hence, the Patriot's day celebrates the large assemblies of the spring of 1837, a democratic and peaceful expression of popular origin, and is held throughout all current Quebec, not only - as the battles - in the sole Montreal area. This festive day conforms to principles of opening, putting forth universal values, while inviting to participate personally and collectively in their safeguarding. It's held third Monday of May, in replacement of Queen Victoria Day.

--HawkFest (talk) 17:11, 18 May 2009 (UTC)

Pointing out the particular efforts of democrats from Daniel Tracy to John Neilson, from Armury Girod to Louis-Joseph Papineau, on Sunday, November 24th, Premier Bernard Landry declared that "This holiday will underline the 1837-1838 Patriots' fight for the recognition of our people, for their political freedom and their access to a democratic system of government —Preceding unsigned comment added by 137.122.14.20 (talk) 19:36, 18 May 2009 (UTC)

There were definitely more than three public meetings. The tone of the text is not encyclopedic and seems to me inappropriate to the article's subject, which is the National Patriots' Day, not the ideology/goals of the Lower Canada patriots. More importantly, the text does not cite sources which makes it unverifiable. It is however true that the day aims to be a celebration of "a democratic and peaceful expression of popular origin". I read it somewhere too, we just need to find who/where/when and quote accurately. :-) -- Mathieugp (talk) 23:11, 18 May 2009 (UTC)

Name of the article.[edit]

Wouldn't the French name be more appropriate? As far as I know, Anglos are free to call it Victoria Day otherwise. Unless someone can reference official government documents calling it National Patriotes Day in English, this title just sounds wrong.--Boffob 15:19, 14 May 2007 (UTC)

It would have to be "patriots" without the "e". elpincha 15:58, 14 May 2007 (UTC)
I don't think so. These are not any "patriots", they are the "Patriotes" (with a capital P) of the 1837-1838 rebellion. Just like the Montreal Canadiens are not the Montreal "canadians". It's a proper team/troop name of some sort. Anyway, I have yet to find a decent link on the matter (the only non-wiki page I could find was bonjourquebec.com, which translated it to both Patriots' National Day and Patriotes' Day on the same page).--Boffob 19:36, 14 May 2007 (UTC)
If it's a proper name then by all means use the "e", but is that the more common usage when in English? IIRC it's not... but I could be wrong. elpincha 04:22, 15 May 2007 (UTC)
Indeed, it's normal to use the French form for this holiday. Using the direct English translation is done to make a point. It compormises the neutrality of the article. --soulscanner (talk) 07:34, 31 July 2008 (UTC)
What???? How is naming the article to something which renders the exact same meaning as the foreign language name "compromises the neutrality of the article"???? -- Mathieugp (talk) 13:28, 31 July 2008 (UTC)

As mentioned below, the most official English name of the holiday, as given by the Government of Quebec on its ministry of labour website, is National Patriots' Day.[1]. Will someone please correct the article title? Maybe as a holiday gift to Wikipedia? Thanks for understanding.Toddsschneider (talk) 17:51, 9 May 2009 (UTC)

Done. -- Mathieugp (talk) 19:13, 9 May 2009 (UTC)

Google Search[edit]

Clearly the the normal usage is Victoria in English; "Journée nationale des Patriotes" in official Quebec government speech:

  • 402,000 hits "Victoria Day" -wiki [2]
  • 4,870 hits "Journée nationale des Patriotes" -Wiki [3]
  • 856 hits "National Patriotes Day" -Wiki[4]

--soulscanner (talk) 08:53, 31 July 2008 (UTC)

What are you doing?[edit]

Soulscanner, you are completely out of line here. You have just politicized and POVed beyond death a perfectly neutral article.

1. Adding stuff like "sovereignist Parti Quebecois government of Bernard Landry passed a law" is precisely the kind of non-neutral language one must avoid.

2. The name of the Day in English is most officially stated here:

http://www.cnt.gouv.qc.ca/en/leaves-and-absences/statutory-holidays/index.html

3. "is the English translation of the Quebec French Journée nationale des Patriotes[1]. The name used by the Quebec government for the Canadian statutory holiday of Victoria Day[2],"

????? No it isn't. The Quebec government would call Victoria Day Victoria Day (if it were ever needed). However in Quebec, the same day has its own holiday. Would you say that Moving Day is how Canada Day is called in Quebec????

4. This is from the Website of Human Resources and Social Development Canada:

"With respect to statutory general holidays, Order 1322-2002 designated as “Journée nationale des Patriotes” (National Patriotes’ Day) the holiday that falls on the Monday preceding May 25 (known as Victoria Day in the other Canadian jurisdictions)." [5]

Please, come to your senses and revert your changes yourself. The POV tag is to signal a POV, not to start adding one! -- Mathieugp (talk) 13:26, 31 July 2008 (UTC)

Mathieu, nearly all of it is weasel wording and should be reverted on sight. I did. The holiday is federal, which means the day is a holiday in all provinces. There is no obligation for it to have the same name in all provinces, although a reference should be made (which it is) of the name in other provinces.--Ramdrake (talk) 12:25, 1 August 2008 (UTC)

Testcases[edit]

Samples with Template:Infobox holiday/date

24 May year: 2010 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
23 May year: 2011 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
21 May year: 2012 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
20 May year: 2013 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
19 May year: 2014 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
25 May year: 2015 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
23 May year: 2016 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
22 May year: 2017 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
21 May year: 2018 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
20 May year: 2019 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =
25 May year: 2020 date rule: Monday on or before 25th of May week_ordinal = weekday = month =

See source for details.